Area gun sales, fears rising

Area gun sales, fears rising

There are 7568 comments on the North Port Sun story from Nov 14, 2012, titled Area gun sales, fears rising. In it, North Port Sun reports that:

Gun stores in Charlotte County have experienced increased sales since Election Day as local gun owners brace for an anticipated restriction of gun laws following the re-election of President Barack Obama.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at North Port Sun.

Yeah

Honolulu, HI

#5259 Feb 15, 2013
Socialism is for Sissies wrote:
<quoted text>I'll saty right here and continue to remind our government what their real funtion is.
Folks like you are clueless as to what that is. I ask politicians all the time "What is the function of government?" All I get is a legnthy disertation that has nothing to do with the answer that takes 10 seconds or less to answer.
Now, before you jump in with "Well, what IS the function of government?", why don't you answer for us and we'll tell you if you're correct.
lol! I notice you people like to take that authoritative position over others to dole out who is/is not right.
Yeah

Honolulu, HI

#5260 Feb 15, 2013
Where Is My America wrote:
<quoted text>A hugh problem was the US Government became the buyer of choice in the secondary mortgage market thus eliminating the need for the seller of the first mortgage to do it's due diligence.
Back in the day when private investors or banks and building and loans were the primary buyers of secondary mortgages it was common practice for 20 percent to be put down on a house with the buyer having little to no debt as well as an income deemed sufficient to make monthly payments .
It was thought that a loan at no more then 80 percent debt to equity would allow the bank to recover at foreclosure.
Had the Government stayed out of social engineering through the mortgages of homes it is safe to say the housing crisis would never have happened to the degree it did.
I agree. That was a part of the problem. But at the same time, those institutions that sold the instruments to Freddie/Fannie also had a legal obligation to certify the loans they were selling. Not only did they fail to do so, they simply lied to churn the loans.

The ltv rules were ignored in favor of profits. Well, now they've returned to that, getting away from their irresponsible criteria. Again, this is not the fault of the buyers but the sellers of these instruments.

When you look at GLB, the role WAS to reduce government's role. The problem was, it created the same issues that forced the creation of Glass-Stegall in the first place.

The housing crisis would have been avoided if banks and other lending institutions simply continued what they were doing prior to GLB.

“Facts”

Since: May 08

Mexico

#5261 Feb 15, 2013
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>lol! I notice you people like to take that authoritative position over others to dole out who is/is not right.
Yes when you have black/morons like you it is so much fun to play with them..........Better than any petting zoo....
Yeah

Honolulu, HI

#5262 Feb 15, 2013
Here Is One wrote:
<quoted text>
Code purple 215 suspect.........I would be willing to bet the punk had jacked more than one car........
Black thugs beware........In Florida alone last year a million more white people bought guns and will be shooting your sorry black but if you mess with them......
You're such an idiot son. And you just love to show it.
Yeah

Honolulu, HI

#5263 Feb 15, 2013
Here Is One wrote:
<quoted text>
No I sold all of my investment property in the USA between 2000 and 2005.........
Yeah... well... whatever son.... I'm sure you sold the Brooklyn Bridge too.

“Facts”

Since: May 08

Mexico

#5265 Feb 15, 2013
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>You're such an idiot son. And you just love to show it.
Proving a black/moron like you wrong???

tell us again how the burden of proof lies with the defense.......

“Facts”

Since: May 08

Mexico

#5266 Feb 15, 2013
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>Yeah... well... whatever son.... I'm sure you sold the Brooklyn Bridge too.
No.........All my investment property was in Nor Cal and Denver.....

“Si vis pacem, para bellum !!”

Since: Dec 07

Southeast Virginia

#5267 Feb 15, 2013
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>If that's the case, why bothering to hire a professional? It's the realtor's job to represent the selller's interest and to protect their client. If the mortgage broker and the realtor tell the client they can afford more, whose to argue with their experience? After all the buyer's realtor is SUPPOSED to work for the buyer. They get paid by the buyer for their PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, which includes knowing the industry. The same for the mortgage brokers.
If you truly believe these "industry professionals" are blameless, then please go ahead and find the same types of loans that were offered like you're showing. I'd like to see the same types of loans today that were being offered in the past.
Your right. The buyer's realtor (if they have one) is SUPPOSED to work for the buyer. From my experience (and I know several), they are mostly working for their own wallets. Which means, they will help you with all the paperwork and make sure that all the i's are dotted and t's are crossed, they may even talk the buyer into a paying for a homeowner's warranty or paying alittle more towards the closing costs, but they are also going to try to get as much of a commission as they can. I'm not saying they are blameless. But that doesn't negate the fact that the BUYER is ultimately responsible to what they sign their name to. Kind of like a woman claiming "so-and-so got me pregnant". Yep he should have used a condom, but bitch...it is YOUR BODY.

Personal responsibility is a truly foreign ideal to you isn't it???

“Si vis pacem, para bellum !!”

Since: Dec 07

Southeast Virginia

#5268 Feb 15, 2013
Where Is My America wrote:
<quoted text>A hugh problem was the US Government became the buyer of choice in the secondary mortgage market thus eliminating the need for the seller of the first mortgage to do it's due diligence.
Back in the day when private investors or banks and building and loans were the primary buyers of secondary mortgages it was common practice for 20 percent to be put down on a house with the buyer having little to no debt as well as an income deemed sufficient to make monthly payments .
It was thought that a loan at no more then 80 percent debt to equity would allow the bank to recover at foreclosure.
Had the Government stayed out of social engineering through the mortgages of homes it is safe to say the housing crisis would never have happened to the degree it did.
No disagreement here.
Spocko

Oakland, CA

#5269 Feb 15, 2013
Fed Up wrote:
So they finally had to come out and admit it, now that the Coroner has released some info along with police.
An AR-15, or the so-called "Assault Weapon", was not used in the school shooting. The shooter even tried weeks earlier to buy a rifle but was turned down in the background check. So he had to kill his Mother to steal her rifle. There were initial reports, right after the shooting, that police found the AR-15 in his car, NOT IN THE SCHOOL. The rifle was not used. The shooter went into the school with 4 handguns, NOT an Assault Rifle as the media has charged. I remember in the initial hours of this shooting, the Police said they found the rifle in the car. But the Administration-controlled MSM had a pre-planned attack already waiting, to ban so-called assault weapons and jumped on that line of reporting, knowing it was a lie, which included people like Piers Morgan who said the shooter used an AR-15 that shoots hundreds of rounds per minute, as if it were a machine gun. Could it be that the Democrat Liberals and THEIR MEDIA were pushing for the new law, hoping they could do it, before the Coroner released the info? Absolutely.
VIDEO: http://video.today.msnbc.msn.com/today/502084...
Your vid clip is two months old yemoron!
According to the CT State Police report, hundreds of .223 shells were found inside the school! Lanza died of a gunshot wound to the head from a 10 mm hand gun, and the bullet was recovered in a classroom wall.
Spocko

Oakland, CA

#5270 Feb 15, 2013
Armed Veteran wrote:
<quoted text>
Your right. The buyer's realtor (if they have one) is SUPPOSED to work for the buyer. From my experience (and I know several), they are mostly working for their own wallets. Which means, they will help you with all the paperwork and make sure that all the i's are dotted and t's are crossed, they may even talk the buyer into a paying for a homeowner's warranty or paying alittle more towards the closing costs, but they are also going to try to get as much of a commission as they can. I'm not saying they are blameless. But that doesn't negate the fact that the BUYER is ultimately responsible to what they sign their name to. Kind of like a woman claiming "so-and-so got me pregnant". Yep he should have used a condom, but bitch...it is YOUR BODY.
Personal responsibility is a truly foreign ideal to you isn't it???
You live in very simple world where everything is black and white and absurdly simplistic! Comparing a real estate/mortgage transaction to -- "Kind of like a woman claiming "so-and-so got me pregnant" -- is beyond stupid, it is nothing short of retarded! There are very serious reasons why we seek professional help to navigate, negotiate and perform complex business transactions or medical procedures. Most mortgage brokers in the country will not touch a questionable client, it is only a few bad apples that put profits before "due diligence." To claim that the individual seeking professional help is to blame is remarkably illogical, something one would get from FAUX News ...
Spocko

Oakland, CA

#5271 Feb 15, 2013
Socialism is for Sissies wrote:
<quoted text>FinallY, youi agree that the government is NOT the answer but the PROBLEM!!!! Get their azzes out of our lives! Socialism sucks not matter which Party's turn it is to promote!
Huh?
xxxrayted

Cleveland, OH

#5272 Feb 15, 2013
Spocko wrote:
<quoted text>
You live in very simple world where everything is black and white and absurdly simplistic! Comparing a real estate/mortgage transaction to -- "Kind of like a woman claiming "so-and-so got me pregnant" -- is beyond stupid, it is nothing short of retarded! There are very serious reasons why we seek professional help to navigate, negotiate and perform complex business transactions or medical procedures. Most mortgage brokers in the country will not touch a questionable client, it is only a few bad apples that put profits before "due diligence." To claim that the individual seeking professional help is to blame is remarkably illogical, something one would get from FAUX News ...
It is their fault for the most part. I watched our news here and seen the places government closed up and threw the owner or employees in jail where they belong. Guess what? They weren't reputable places. Joe's Barber Shop and Loan isn't the place you trust when larger organizations turned you down.

For most people, a house is the largest purchase you will ever make in your life. If you don't know WTF you're doing, then the responsible thing is to hire people that do. You get your loan and real estate help from reputable places. You hire a lawyer or an accountant to help you figure out the facts such as when you get a loan for 2.95% on an arm, it's not going to go down. It's going to go up. And when it does, what does that mean to you as the person paying the mortgage?

The tear jerking stories I've seen on the news made me shake my head. The working people who got caught in all this had no idea what happens when their interest rate doubled. Some didn't even know they were on an adjustable mortgage loan. They never read any of the paperwork because they didn't understand it. They just signed their name to the dozens of forms and got their house. That's all they wanted to know about it at the time.
xxxrayted

Cleveland, OH

#5273 Feb 15, 2013
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>I agree. That was a part of the problem. But at the same time, those institutions that sold the instruments to Freddie/Fannie also had a legal obligation to certify the loans they were selling. Not only did they fail to do so, they simply lied to churn the loans.
The ltv rules were ignored in favor of profits. Well, now they've returned to that, getting away from their irresponsible criteria. Again, this is not the fault of the buyers but the sellers of these instruments.
When you look at GLB, the role WAS to reduce government's role. The problem was, it created the same issues that forced the creation of Glass-Stegall in the first place.
The housing crisis would have been avoided if banks and other lending institutions simply continued what they were doing prior to GLB.
It's government that pressured banks into giving bad loans. And why not? The banks made their money processing the loan. Then it went to Fanny, Freddy or a number of other wholesale places that shuffled those bad mortgages to Wall Street.

Banks sets their standards for primary loans because it's their money. For sub-prime loans and government assisted loans, government sets the standards.

The way we could have avoided the housing collapse was to let banks set their own standards. After all, you can't bundle bad securities unless you have those bad securities to begin with, and everybody knew those were all bad loans.
xxxrayted

Cleveland, OH

#5274 Feb 15, 2013
Where Is My America wrote:
<quoted text>A hugh problem was the US Government became the buyer of choice in the secondary mortgage market thus eliminating the need for the seller of the first mortgage to do it's due diligence.
Back in the day when private investors or banks and building and loans were the primary buyers of secondary mortgages it was common practice for 20 percent to be put down on a house with the buyer having little to no debt as well as an income deemed sufficient to make monthly payments .
It was thought that a loan at no more then 80 percent debt to equity would allow the bank to recover at foreclosure.
Had the Government stayed out of social engineering through the mortgages of homes it is safe to say the housing crisis would never have happened to the degree it did.
It probably wouldn't have happened at all.

If you save $16,000 to use as a down payment on a house, you guard that $16,000 with your life. You saved for years to accumulate that $16,000, and you're not about to risk losing it for anything.

You know that if you (for whatever reason) can't keep up with your mortgage payments, you can kiss that hard earned down payment goodbye. It's gone, and everything you worked for as well.

However, if you have no skin in the game, what do you care? You buy a house with no money down, and if you get foreclosed on, you lose nothing! You get a bad credit rating for a couple of years, that's all.

People treat their own money differently than they treat other people's money. You don't pamper a rental car the way you do your car--especially while you're making monthly payments on the thing.
xxxrayted

Cleveland, OH

#5275 Feb 15, 2013
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>Why don't you move to a country where there's no government? Like Somalia?
Then all your complaints and prayers will have been answered.
Well if you like a cradle to grave government, why don't you move to Cuba, China or North Korea? They have government everything over there. You don't have to worry about a thing. Government makes all your decisions for you.
Yeah

Honolulu, HI

#5276 Feb 15, 2013
Armed Veteran wrote:
<quoted text>
Your right. The buyer's realtor (if they have one) is SUPPOSED to work for the buyer. From my experience (and I know several), they are mostly working for their own wallets. Which means, they will help you with all the paperwork and make sure that all the i's are dotted and t's are crossed, they may even talk the buyer into a paying for a homeowner's warranty or paying alittle more towards the closing costs, but they are also going to try to get as much of a commission as they can. I'm not saying they are blameless. But that doesn't negate the fact that the BUYER is ultimately responsible to what they sign their name to. Kind of like a woman claiming "so-and-so got me pregnant". Yep he should have used a condom, but bitch...it is YOUR BODY.
Personal responsibility is a truly foreign ideal to you isn't it???
Sure they work for their own wallets. The problem at the time was the new programs allowed people to buy more than they could afford. Realtor's pitched this with the "logic" that their incomes would go up over time so they would get ahead in the long run.

And when this happened, it triggered a bidding war. Since limits went up, people wanted more. So they tried to buy more to "keep up with the Jones'".... right up until the bubble popped.

I've seen a realtor try to work both sides... sell a client's place while simultaneous trying to buy. The contract was written in such a way that the seller could beg out for any reason, but it was missed by the buyer's realtor. So the deal fell through.... and kept the buyer's deposit.

On top of that, the purchase was contingent on the sale of the original place...

And on top of this, there were problems on getting the loan the realtor and mortgage broker "knew" was easy to get. So they strung the person along until the very last moment.

Needless to say, the potential buyer wasn't happy.

When you're paying for professional service and you don't get it, I say there's a bigger problem.
Yeah

Honolulu, HI

#5277 Feb 15, 2013
Spocko wrote:
<quoted text>
You live in very simple world where everything is black and white and absurdly simplistic! Comparing a real estate/mortgage transaction to -- "Kind of like a woman claiming "so-and-so got me pregnant" -- is beyond stupid, it is nothing short of retarded! There are very serious reasons why we seek professional help to navigate, negotiate and perform complex business transactions or medical procedures. Most mortgage brokers in the country will not touch a questionable client, it is only a few bad apples that put profits before "due diligence." To claim that the individual seeking professional help is to blame is remarkably illogical, something one would get from FAUX News ...
Correct. That's why you're PAYING these people to put your interests first and foremost.
xxxrayted

Cleveland, OH

#5278 Feb 15, 2013
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>If that's the case, why bothering to hire a professional? It's the realtor's job to represent the selller's interest and to protect their client. If the mortgage broker and the realtor tell the client they can afford more, whose to argue with their experience? After all the buyer's realtor is SUPPOSED to work for the buyer. They get paid by the buyer for their PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, which includes knowing the industry. The same for the mortgage brokers.
If you truly believe these "industry professionals" are blameless, then please go ahead and find the same types of loans that were offered like you're showing. I'd like to see the same types of loans today that were being offered in the past.
You're not going to see that because the rules went in reverse. Today, it's almost impossible for many people to get a loan which they site as one of the reasons housing growth is so slow.

My newest tenant was a neighbor down the street looking high and low for someplace to move. They were living in his sisters house and she got foreclosed on. They claimed they couldn't find a descent rent anywhere. This was before I knew I was going to have a vacant apartment.

So I went online to Craig's list to find them an apartment in their price range. I use Craig's List to find most of my tenants. Low and behold, I couldn't find them one place either. I couldn't believe the change in rentals in just one year. When I advertised my apartments, I am usually competing with dozens of other landlords in the area. Not anymore. It's a landlords market now. Everybody is renting today because they can't get a home loan.
Yeah

Honolulu, HI

#5279 Feb 15, 2013
xxxrayted wrote:
<quoted text>
It's government that pressured banks into giving bad loans. And why not? The banks made their money processing the loan. Then it went to Fanny, Freddy or a number of other wholesale places that shuffled those bad mortgages to Wall Street.
Banks sets their standards for primary loans because it's their money. For sub-prime loans and government assisted loans, government sets the standards.
The way we could have avoided the housing collapse was to let banks set their own standards. After all, you can't bundle bad securities unless you have those bad securities to begin with, and everybody knew those were all bad loans.
lol! Again, it's your word son on something I've shown isn't true. You keep trying to blame people you hold responsible because you think it provides political brownie points.

You keep spewing your opinion as if they're facts... and that's as far as you go.

BTW, some banks DID set their loan standards. With the blessings of the SEC no less. Which is why the big banks got in trouble.

As for the securities, we know BoA and Countrywide knew the loans were bad. That's why they had to buy back the loans and pay a huge penalty.

You really should keep up with the times son.... and the facts!

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