College sports need more women coaches -- Social Issues

Full story: The Morning Call

CHARLES L. KENNEDY ''In only two conferences, the Big Ten and the Mid-American Conference , women held over 50 percent of the head coaching positions for women's sports.'' In 2008 it is guaranteed by U.S. law ...
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1 - 20 of 24 Comments Last updated Jul 18, 2008
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Joe Anybody

Allentown, PA

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#1
May 30, 2008
 
Maybe if more females were qualified or applied they would get the job.
The Truth

Bethlehem, PA

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#2
May 30, 2008
 
It's shocking that there aren't more Summits and VanDerveers coaching women's teams on the intercollegiate level. In my most recent study,''The Glass Ceiling Report Card II,'' of the 1,082 women's athletic teams at 115 colleges in the major Division I conferences, only 47.9 percent of the head coaches are female. Additionally, only 53.5 percent of the 2,372 assistant coaches for these teams are women.

Ummm....does your report show how many women applied for those jobs? Does it show the difference of experience of those women who lost the job to a man?

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I find it almost incomprehensible that 36 years after the passage of Title IX, the landmark legislation that prohibits discrimination against women by all schools receiving federal funds, that there aren't more female coaches in college sports. I can't believe that there aren't more women who are both interested in coaching and qualified to coach women's teams. I mentioned this to a colleague, and a fellow sports fan, and his comment was startling.''Qualified women probably aren't interested and interested women aren't qualified.'' I suspect this was the same argument that was used prior to Title IX to deny women seats in law school and medical school.

Could it be that you simply can't accept the reality of things?

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After watching the championship game between the Lady Volunteers and the Cardinal, I am sure there are many thousands of young girls, whose role model is Candace Parker or Candice Musser. I am equally sure there are many women basketball players who aspire to be a head coach like Pat Summit or Tara VanDerveer.

What makes you so sure of these two comments? Did you talk to every one of them?
Berks_Iraq_Vet

Fort Huachuca, AZ

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#3
May 30, 2008
 
A political science professor. Enough said.....
realist

Harrisburg, PA

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#4
May 30, 2008
 
Title IX is ruining college sports. its taking sports away from everybody.
Dave

Allentown, PA

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#5
May 30, 2008
 
Joe Anybody wrote:
Maybe if more females were qualified or applied they would get the job.
completely agree! They need to actually APPLY for the jobs... and even then, they better be the most qualified for the job if they DO get it!
Concerned American

United States

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#6
May 30, 2008
 
realist wrote:
Title IX is ruining college sports. its taking sports away from everybody.
I agree, ask any parent who supported their son's participation in a sport for 10+ years with the hopes of attaining some scholarships in college. A perfect example is men's gymnastics, a very difficult sport with year round training. If you're a girl, you get a full ride to any college of your choice by agreeing to participate in a sport that they do not know the first thing about. Not a penny in scholarships available for the average male gymnast who worked so hard for so many years. This is simply wrong, title IX needs to be revisited and make necessary changes.

“Have some balls: REGISTER”

Since: Jul 07

Bethlehem

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#7
May 31, 2008
 
Concerned American wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree, ask any parent who supported their son's participation in a sport for 10+ years with the hopes of attaining some scholarships in college. A perfect example is men's gymnastics, a very difficult sport with year round training. If you're a girl, you get a full ride to any college of your choice by agreeing to participate in a sport that they do not know the first thing about. Not a penny in scholarships available for the average male gymnast who worked so hard for so many years. This is simply wrong, title IX needs to be revisited and make necessary changes.
There are only 86 schools that have women's gymnastics teams of any sort--hardly "any college of your choice" and less than half of those have scholarships. The costs and the interests schools have in carrying mens gymnastics are prohibitive--with or without title 9.

Title 9 has been around for a long time--it hasn't ruined anything.
Concerned American

United States

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#8
May 31, 2008
 
I am saying a girl who hasn't played any sport in her past life can attain a scholarship by participating in a women's sport in college, my statement did not refer to women's gymnastics in general.
I know for a fact that before title 9 came to be all male gymnasts who graduated from high school and competed at a national level received free scholarships from more than 150 colleges. After title 9, only a select few, like the top 20 in the nation received them and the colleges began dropping the program year after year. Now only a handful of colleges offer men's gymnastics. This was not the only sport that was affected, many other men's sports also lost their scholarships. Wrestling, golf etc. My concern is money going to a person who never played a sport versus an individual who worked hard and received nill. I could care less if it's a male or female, if you've earned something, it shouldn't be taken away and given to someone who hasn't. That is my gripe of title 9.
Athlete

Alexandria, VA

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#9
Jun 1, 2008
 
Before one starts creating a quota or saying that women's teams should be coached by women, they should look and see why more men are coaching womens teams. The main drive behind men moving from coaching mens programs to womens programs is 9 out of 10 times the womens coaching position pays more then the mens equivalent coaching position in olympic sports. So basic economics for coaches, coach the team that pays more. How it is that equivalent coaching positions pay such a differential is contaray to the concept of Title IX. So in the end Title IX is the driving force in men coaching women's teams since Title IX does not look at individual sports but athletic programs in entirety. So to balance football women's program coaches are paid more then the equivanent men's sport. Got to love the way Title IX has been corrupted and abused.
Athlete

Alexandria, VA

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#10
Jun 1, 2008
 
In response to Scooplove did you know that women's gymnastics has 12 full scholarships to offer at the division I level while men's gymnastics has on 6.3 scholarships... how is that not biased?

“Have some balls: REGISTER”

Since: Jul 07

Bethlehem

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#11
Jun 1, 2008
 
Concerned American wrote:
I am saying a girl who hasn't played any sport in her past life can attain a scholarship by participating in a women's sport in college, my statement did not refer to women's gymnastics in general.
I know for a fact that before title 9 came to be all male gymnasts who graduated from high school and competed at a national level received free scholarships from more than 150 colleges. After title 9, only a select few, like the top 20 in the nation received them and the colleges began dropping the program year after year. Now only a handful of colleges offer men's gymnastics. This was not the only sport that was affected, many other men's sports also lost their scholarships. Wrestling, golf etc. My concern is money going to a person who never played a sport versus an individual who worked hard and received nill. I could care less if it's a male or female, if you've earned something, it shouldn't be taken away and given to someone who hasn't. That is my gripe of title 9.
What? There aren't women getting athletic scholarships who never played a sport in their life. Not even at the D3 level. It isn't happening. Name one. Please. I can understand (but not agree with) the argument that Title IX is detrimental but you are making a completely false accusation. Show me one. Point me to a college team website (and they all have them) where there's a woman whose bio states "never played the sport in high school." There's a reasonable argument to be made against title 9. Trying to act like women who never played a sport in their life are getting athletic scholarships isn't one of them.
There shouldn't be that many men's gymnastics scholarships because there aren't that many male gymnists.
Title IX opened the door for a lot more scholarships, not less. You just don't seem to like who is getting the scholarships.

“Have some balls: REGISTER”

Since: Jul 07

Bethlehem

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#12
Jun 1, 2008
 
Athlete wrote:
Before one starts creating a quota or saying that women's teams should be coached by women, they should look and see why more men are coaching womens teams. The main drive behind men moving from coaching mens programs to womens programs is 9 out of 10 times the womens coaching position pays more then the mens equivalent coaching position in olympic sports. So basic economics for coaches, coach the team that pays more. How it is that equivalent coaching positions pay such a differential is contaray to the concept of Title IX. So in the end Title IX is the driving force in men coaching women's teams since Title IX does not look at individual sports but athletic programs in entirety. So to balance football women's program coaches are paid more then the equivanent men's sport. Got to love the way Title IX has been corrupted and abused.
Interesting. Where can I read this study?
Concerned American

United States

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#13
Jun 1, 2008
 
You obviously have never been to a men's gymnastics national junior olympic championship competition to see just how many men participate in the sport. There are hundreds competiting that actually qualify, not to mention those that did not qualify. Ever read the sports section from a Parkette competition? This individual small gym alone draws around 200 male competitors for a regular season meet. After graduation, some are becoming cheerleaders just to receive scholarships. The rest try to fill spots in the few colleges that still have programs from graduating seniors without any $$$ because they love the sport, others are forced to just quit.
As for girls getting money that didn't play any sports, there are colleges that started women's rowing teams because of the additional funds they had to work with from title 9. Girls never participated in this sport in their past, received these funds.

“Have some balls: REGISTER”

Since: Jul 07

Bethlehem

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#14
Jun 1, 2008
 
Look...

Your son picked the wrong sport if you are looking for scholarship cash. I respect how hard any athlete works and ten seconds on the rings tells me all I want to know about how incredibly challenging gymnastics is.

Still, I have a very difficult time believing there would be much more scholarship money available if Title IX wasn't around.

Title IX is about providing an equitable number of scholarships between male and female athletes. The much problemo is football--there's just no female equivelant sport in terms of numbers. Colleges weren't going to drop football without alumni going ape. They cut gymnastics and wrestling--and not too many people cared.

Again, there is more scholarship money available to athletes (even at the D3 level which publically claims they don't offer scholarships) then there ever has been. That's a good thing. I'm willing to bet the same percentage of male gymnasts qualify for scholarships as do female field hockey players.
Concerned American

United States

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#15
Jun 1, 2008
 
Truth be told, when he started doing the sport in 1992, he fell in love with it. At the time, there was well over 150 colleges with programs and every graduating gymnast garnered full rides to great colleges. When he was a sophmore in high school, the real effects of title 9 began to take hold and the colleges started dropping the program every year after. When he graduated from high school, there were only 30 some left. Last time I heard, there were under 20 colleges with a scholarship program. Then to make it worse, colleges like Penn State, give their scholarships to gymnasts from other countries and aren't even American citizens. Check out their roster. What they do is break the scholarships and share a full one with 4. We all know how far that goes. With gymnastics being one of the first Olympic sports, and taking the consideration their year round training to keep their bodies at optimon performance, they are the strongest athletes in the world. Too bad they are given such little respect. The football team at my sons college stated they could never in a million years, do what the gym team does. Even though things worked out the way they did, my son has absolutely no regrets and states if he had to do all over again, he would still be a gymnast.
I have to respectfully disagree with your statement that not too many people cared. The wrestlers,(Northampton had a huge wrestling program) golf and tennis clubs etc. all took the same blow. Only so many guys can be on a football and basketball team. The others have to do something. They are studying the true effects of title 9, and for the sake of the boys that play any sport other than football and basketball, I hope they make fair changes. It's not just sour grapes from my point of view, I hope you understand my observations.

“Have some balls: REGISTER”

Since: Jul 07

Bethlehem

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#16
Jun 2, 2008
 
Yeah, saying nobody cared gave the wrong impression. The kids who played the sport cared, but it didn't cause alumni to get into an uproar. IE...The alumni would stop giving if Penn State dropped 15 scholarships...they wouldn't if they dropped wrestling (even though I am aware how popular the sport is.)

I won't argue for a second that gymnastics isn't incredibly challenging.
realist

Harrisburg, PA

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#17
Jun 2, 2008
 
Scooplove wrote:
Look...
Your son picked the wrong sport if you are looking for scholarship cash. I respect how hard any athlete works and ten seconds on the rings tells me all I want to know about how incredibly challenging gymnastics is.
Still, I have a very difficult time believing there would be much more scholarship money available if Title IX wasn't around.
Title IX is about providing an equitable number of scholarships between male and female athletes. The much problemo is football--there's just no female equivelant sport in terms of numbers. Colleges weren't going to drop football without alumni going ape. They cut gymnastics and wrestling--and not too many people cared.
Again, there is more scholarship money available to athletes (even at the D3 level which publically claims they don't offer scholarships) then there ever has been. That's a good thing. I'm willing to bet the same percentage of male gymnasts qualify for scholarships as do female field hockey players.
this is totally false. title ix also calls for an equal number of men and women's sports to be offered at any given college. colleges dont have an abudant amount of money, so instead of creating another woman sport (which there isnt an infinite amount), a male sport folds. take for instance the wrestling program at moravian. it once had a large number of wrestlers in the program, it now no longer exists because of title ix. even AFTER moravian added girls lacrosse and field hockey.
Concerned American

United States

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#18
Jun 2, 2008
 
realist wrote:
<quoted text>
this is totally false. title ix also calls for an equal number of men and women's sports to be offered at any given college. colleges dont have an abudant amount of money, so instead of creating another woman sport (which there isnt an infinite amount), a male sport folds. take for instance the wrestling program at moravian. it once had a large number of wrestlers in the program, it now no longer exists because of title ix. even AFTER moravian added girls lacrosse and field hockey.
Yes, you see the effects I have seen. Don't get me wrong, I'm glad for the girls having great opportunities, but way too many men's sports have suffered because of it. There really must be a better way of handling the fairness.

“Have some balls: REGISTER”

Since: Jul 07

Bethlehem

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#19
Jun 2, 2008
 
My understanding of Title IX is that the opportunities for women must be commensurate with that of the student body at large. Off the top of my head, American University has two more women's sports then men's. The heck of it is---not a single school has been sanctioned or disciplined because of Title IX.

Men's Gymnastics and wrestling could've been saved...cut the football scholarship limit to 60 players. For some reason that point of view is blasphemous. I'm a HUGE college football fan but I can see the merit in doing that.
Concerned American

United States

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#20
Jun 2, 2008
 
I do not believe they will ever cut the football scholarships. Reason is, this sport brings in the bulk of their money that funds college sports in general.
My understanding of title 9 is that women must be offered the same number of sports activities and the same number of scholarships as men. To meet these demands, mens scholarships, plus certain sports were eliminated to free up more money and programs for the women. Now, the colleges may offer certain sports for men, but without scholarships. And if the sport becomes too expensive to manage, the program is eliminated completely. Getting back to gymnastics, there is talk that private clubs will take over gymnastics teams at some colleges to protect the sport from becoming extinct, but the student will most likely have to pay for this opportunity, just like in high school. Or get sponsors to assist in the cost. Training in this sport is very expensive. Considering traveling expenses for competitions, uniforms, grips, coaching fees etc., we were paying over $1000.00 a month when competing at the national levels. Those costs were over 5 years ago, I imagine they have gone up. We could have easily paid for his college. Football is practically free for athletes in public schooling and they get the money.

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