S. Calif. Wildfire Burns Church, Castle

Full story: Chicago Tribune

A wildfire driven by powerful Santa Ana wind threatened a university and forced the evacuation of hundreds of homes in the Malibu Hills on Sunday, authorities said.
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1 - 20 of 24 Comments Last updated Oct 25, 2007
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swimcgood

Oak Park, IL

#1 Oct 22, 2007
good artical
swimcgood

Oak Park, IL

#2 Oct 22, 2007
hi
curious

Walnut, IL

#3 Oct 23, 2007
I feel for these people, but I do have to wonder; since a fair percentage of the evacuees are middle to upper income and white, how much more quickly will this area receive attention and rebuilding than New Orleans?
Bud

AOL

#5 Oct 23, 2007
Californians are "self -relient" not like the people of New Orleans who sat around waiting for a "hand-out" from the federal government. Most if not all have insurance against disasters like this. Feel sorry for them ! They didn't have 3 days of warning like in huricanes....
Kate

Skokie, IL

#6 Oct 23, 2007
I am from Santa Clarita, CA. We used to live in the Canyon Country area, then North Valencia. Fires and the Santa Ana's are a fact of life. That being said, many, MANY property owners simply WILL NOT follow the LA Co Fire Dept. brush set-backs around their homes. They insist upon over-planting their properties. Or, they put in non-native, inappropriate vegetation. They will stack cords of wood near their homes. We used to live near the top of a ridge line in Valencia; before that, we lived half-way down the hill in a canyon. We were ALWAYS ready to leave.

Unfortunately, most of the house fires start when someone has done everything right but embers from as far away as two miles are drawn up into the overhanging eaves of the homes. It could happen anywhere, anytime there is a fire in the vicinity. So, judge not - lest ye be judged!
American Chick

San Francisco, CA

#7 Oct 23, 2007
curious wrote:
I feel for these people, but I do have to wonder; since a fair percentage of the evacuees are middle to upper income and white, how much more quickly will this area receive attention and rebuilding than New Orleans?
One, yes the got out - they didn't stay behind, and two, yes the area will be rebuilt by the people who lost their homes
hubie

United States

#8 Oct 23, 2007
Born and raised in Illinois. I love green grass, flowers and trees. Give me rain in summer and snow in winter. Some of my relatives moved to California from Il. and Wi. When it is the dry season, the countryside is brown and dangerously flamable. Smokers are forbidden to throw their cigarette butts out of auto windows. I heard of a lawn mower starting an out of contol wildfire. That homeowner got in serious trouble. Like I said, I'll stay here in the land of 4 seasons and plenty of water!
All said, God bless them!
Kate

Skokie, IL

#11 Oct 23, 2007
Samuel Whitcomb wrote:
The inferno is God's way of telling the homosexual sinners living there to STOP. Next will come heavy rains and MUD SLIDES - a good example of what the heathens will siffer after DEATH!
FIRE and then MUD to quench their thirst !!!!
Couldn't happen to a better bunch of HEATHENS !!!
God loves you!
Typical self-righteous, holier-than-thou right-wing nut job.
Samuel Whitcomb wrote:
The inferno is God's way of telling the homosexual sinners living there to STOP. Next will come heavy rains and MUD LSIDES...
Next will come the rains... BECAUSE it's FALL going into WINTER!! MUD SLIDES happen because the vegetation is lost, and the roots can no longer hold the soil... that can happen anywhere, at any time in the correct circumstances.
Samuel Whitcomb wrote:
- a good example of what the heathens will siffer after DEATH!
FIRE and then MUD to quench their thirst !!!!
Couldn't happen to a better bunch of HEATHENS !!!
God loves you!
Your brain is showing signs of the same thing... burning with evilness and hate. As the smugness and self-righteousness as obviously set-in, you're surely already experiencing delusions of grandeur. Maybe you need to re-read the Book of Romans in the Bible, specifically verse 12, lines 15 through 21:

"Rejoice with those who rejoice, and weep with those who weep. Be of the same mind toward one another; do not be haughty in the mind, but associate with the lowly. Do not be wise in your own estimation. Never pay back evil for evil to anyone. Respect what is right in the sight of all men. If possible, so far as it depends on you, be at peace with all men. Never take your own revenge, beloved, but leave room for the wrath of God, for it is written, "Vengeance is Mine, I will repay," says the Lord. "But if your enemy is hungry, feed him, and if he is thirsty, give him a drink; for in so doing you will heap burning coals upon his head." Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good.(Romans 12:15-21)"

In other words, God has things covered. Let Him take care of the afterlife part of it... for your own sake!
Kate

Skokie, IL

#12 Oct 23, 2007
hubie wrote:
Born and raised in Illinois. I love green grass, flowers and trees. Give me rain in summer and snow in winter. Some of my relatives moved to California from Il. and Wi. When it is the dry season, the countryside is brown and dangerously flamable. Smokers are forbidden to throw their cigarette butts out of auto windows. I heard of a lawn mower starting an out of contol wildfire. That homeowner got in serious trouble. Like I said, I'll stay here in the land of 4 seasons and plenty of water!
All said, God bless them!
I love Illinois. I certainly DO NOT MISS the fire season, though the first time we experienced a "Prairie Burn" here, we all kinda FREAKED OUT!!
;)~
.
American Chick

San Francisco, CA

#13 Oct 23, 2007
Samuel Whitcomb wrote:
The inferno is God's way of telling the homosexual sinners living there to STOP.
Next will come heavy rains and MUD SLIDES - a good example of what the heathens will siffer after DEATH!
FIRE and then MUD to quench their thirst !!!!
Couldn't happen to a better bunch of HEATHENS !!!
God loves you!
God loves but you obviously hate
Funny Girl

Holly, MI

#14 Oct 23, 2007
Kate wrote:
<quoted text>
I love Illinois. I certainly DO NOT MISS the fire season, though the first time we experienced a "Prairie Burn" here, we all kinda FREAKED OUT!!
;)~
.
And tornadoes, lest we forget the F5 that leveled Plainfield so many years ago. We are all not without our threats, wherever we live.

I hate to get all 'environmental' on everyone, but once again... does this relate to global warming?(in regards to the abnormally bad winds out there - not the fire itself). There just seems to be one disaster after another, hurricanes, winds, and speaking of tornadoes... those that touched down in the mid-west last week. In October!? My roommate is new to the mid-west and she was freakin' out over that tornado!
Nathan Hale

Pompano Beach, FL

#16 Oct 24, 2007
Hope the fires stop soon but always let the fire burn within:

Fire Up

Pompano Beach, FL

#17 Oct 24, 2007
It's great the winds are slowing down. When you want to get fired back up;
ultimate bigot

Argyle, TX

#18 Oct 24, 2007
I feel badly for the people who lost their homes and hope most people are safe, but wonder how much of this they brought upon themselves. The photos of the area show buildings in the woods with no clear line around them. I can understand wanting to live in a beautiful area with scenery and serenity but there should be a limit to how much they can encroach on the trees. This is the second major set of fires in California this year and the damage to homes is always incredibly high. Yes most have insurance and those without will receive disaster relief, but who pays for it. It is hard to believe, in the state with some of the strictest laws, would not have zoning and building laws that would prohibit rebuilding many of these areas. Forest fires happen naturally and many experts say the best thing is to let them burn. Many species of tree actually need the fires to reproduce more effectively. Forest fires will happen but with all the homes so close to or in the woods they will become damaged or destroyed on a regular basis.

The answer may be to require much larger lots and much smaller homes so more can be done to keep the area around homes safer from spreading fires. I am sure the people who live there are sick of losing their homes but at least they got to enjoy them while they lasted, we did not but will still end up paying for the damage through increased taxes and higher insurance premiums on homes not in a fire prone area. This is no different than the people in other areas of the country who must have a mansion on the coast and when the hurricanes come they just rebuild and wait for the inevitable to happen. Sooner or later the insurance companies will want to stop insuring homes in fire areas like they do now in flood areas. With no insurance available no lenders will consider a mortgage on a home. Is that because they are smarter than those who want to live in high damage prone areas, I think so? The insurance companies who operate for profit will either discontinue coverage or set rates so high as to discourage most from rebuilding, but then the Fed will step in and make it even more of the responsibility of the rest of us who must suffer living in drab unremarkable surrounding.

The saddest part of this tragedy is that it is not over yet, when the rains come without the vegetation to limit erosion many of those homes that survived this will then be victim to mud slides. Sooner or later we must all learn to live within our means not in terms of money but in harmony with the earth.
Funny Girl

Holly, MI

#19 Oct 24, 2007
"I feel badly for the people who lost their homes and hope most people are safe, but wonder how much of this they brought upon themselves."

Huh?

There are very few places in this country that are "safe" from natural disasters. East Coast and South gets pumbled by hurricanes, West Coast by fires and the Midwest by tornadoes... oh and then there is that pesky massive fault line running under St. Louis.

Hey, maybe we should all move to Montana?

This is another disaster. Again, we hear of unusually strong winds, unusually active season of hurricanes, unusual warmth in October spawning unusually strong fall tornadoes across the midwest. When does it stop being "unusual" and start being the "reality" we are all bringing down on ourselves?

Is global warming still a "theory"? When are we going to seriously have this discussion? When is the United States going to stop their reliance on oil? When are we going to realize this little environmental crisis might be real? When we lose our homes two, three, four times?

Of course, I'm worried sick about family and friends in California right now. But they didn't bring it on themselves, we all are bringing it ALL on ourselves. Right now. Think of that next time you drive your car two blocks to the grocery store. Think of that when you let the clerk double plastic bag the one thing you bought. Think of it when you turn your heat up because you have to keep the double foyer grand entrance hall to your giant house warm. Think of that when you leave half your lights on at night or in empty rooms, or when throw two things in the dryer, or when you run the dishwasher with three dishes in it. Think of that when you can't be bothered to recycle.

Good God man, we are bringing this on ourselves.
Goldreck

Chicago, IL

#20 Oct 24, 2007
Excellent, fair article, especially for AP. Much unlike ABC which first tried to look for someone to blame for what is pretty much an every three-years' occurrence. The ABC female reporter who interviewed Schwarzenneger was
a disgrace to the journalism profession, trying to afix blame amid all of the exemplary performances by fire fighters, police, National Guard, civilian volunteers, medical personnel and the fire victims themselves. Fortunately, the governor put the reporter in her place.
Kate

Skokie, IL

#21 Oct 24, 2007
Funny Girl wrote:
There are very few places in this country that are "safe" from natural disasters. East Coast and South gets pumbled by hurricanes, West Coast by fires and the Midwest by tornadoes... oh and then there is that pesky massive fault line running under St. Louis.
Hey, maybe we should all move to Montana?
Ummmmm well, the city of Butte, Montana does have the B.P.(ARCO)Anaconda open pit mine. Beginning in the 1980s, the Environmental Protection Agency designated the Upper Clark Fork river basin and many associated areas as Superfund sites - the nation's largest due to severe groundwater poisoning from heavy metals and Radioisotopes containing Uranium in the mine pit leaching into surrounding groundwaters... and Wyoming is no better, because Yellowstone is just one, big, active volcanic zone. So, no matter where you are in this country, there is some kind of natural disaster waiting to happen... to someone, somewhere, anytime...
Funny Girl

Holly, MI

#22 Oct 24, 2007
So true Kate... I love it.

I shake my head at the posts of people here and on other posts who say, "they deserve what they had coming"... I've spent a lot of time all over the West Coast (moving there as soon as my contract ends), and I can tell you they are far more aware of their carbon footprint then anywhere else in the United States.

The nerve of people talking about "encroaching on the trees," what about the Illinois prairies? Look at the suburban sprawl, will they "get what they deserve" when the next f5 rolls through town? Makes me sick. All those big paper houses will indeed be blown away.

Anyway, the fires are hardly limited to those in "rural" areas. And I promise you, those who are living in rural areas are having a far less impact on the land than anyone else in this country... I know because I've been to the most remote parts of California... the parts people say, "Huh? Where? Where is that?" The people who live "out there" care a hellofalotmore about our earth than most.
ultimate bigot

Argyle, TX

#23 Oct 25, 2007
Once again proof that most of you cannot read, think or have any logic. Most of you immediately go into emotional reasons rather than logic. If there were not residences right at the edge or in the woods, when the woods burn which they will do there would be far much less damage to the homes or the woods since houses catch fire easier than a healthy forest. If the people of california were really concerned about their carbon footprint half of them would move and the other half would stop reproducing. The real cause of global warming is 6 billion constantly on 98.6 degree space heaters.
curious

Walnut, IL

#24 Oct 25, 2007
--Here's something to think about:

If,(and this is a huge supposition) hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles become a reality, instead of a firetrap LA will become a tropical rainforest.

Think about it: 15 million+ vehicles in a BASIN surrounded by mountains all venting water vapor instead of carbon monoxide. How long do you think it would be before it rains every day there?

As soon as (IF!) they start mass-producing these vehicles, I'm selling flood insurance in LA!

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