Atheism requires as much faith as rel...

Atheism requires as much faith as religion?

There are 258478 comments on the Webbunny tumblelog story from Jul 18, 2009, titled Atheism requires as much faith as religion?. In it, Webbunny tumblelog reports that:

Atheism requires as much faith as religion? bearvspuma : The only problem with this rationalization is that ita s assuming all athiests are so because theya re intelligent in the ways of science and reasoning and all people that believe in a form of god are unintelligent.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Webbunny tumblelog.

“When you treat people as they ”

Since: Nov 10

treat you they get offended.

#231560 Jul 1, 2014
Hidingfromyou wrote:
<quoted text>
ah-hahaha! What a jerkface!
I got my first stalker by telling the Chinese guy I went on one date "wa ai ni" (or "wo ai ni" or whatever)- I love you. He took it quite seriously, despite that I very likely mangled the pronunciation. Thereafter I had stalker boy showing up at my doorstep waaaaaaaay after the last train - worse, we haven't seen each other in 8 wonderful years and I still get "I love you" emails.
That led to Hiding's rule: never tell the person "I love you" in their native language until you mean it!
You sure you didn’t say w&#466; sh&#257;n &#257;o n&#464; h&#283;nji&#468;le

“When you treat people as they ”

Since: Nov 10

treat you they get offended.

#231561 Jul 1, 2014
Lets try again from notepad

"W&#466; ài n&#464; h&#283;nji&#468;le "

“When you treat people as they ”

Since: Nov 10

treat you they get offended.

#231562 Jul 1, 2014
Nope still the same extended character set – sorry, I can’t see a way round this so in English

I love you long time

“A sentient umbrella speaks”

Since: Mar 11

Some stable somewhere

#231563 Jul 1, 2014
KiMare wrote:
<quoted text>
<quoted text>
You are right, I am confused about which word you claim is a translation, because 'two-spirit' is not.
Here is the literal translation; "Other scholars use specific native terms, such as winkte (from Lakota) or nadle (from Navajo), or else use a literal translation, such as "man-woman," of a native word."
Which brings us to your other claim:
<quoted text>
"a man who adopts the dress and social roles traditionally assigned to women.
[1800–10; < North American French; French bardache boy prostitute."
A man who dresses like a prostitute and is passed around is not an abused transgendered person?
Your PC twirl is making you stupid.
Smile.
First, good point. We should just refer to them as "Winkte" and "Nadle," and whatever terms the native groups actually used. That would translate more cultural meaning to us and allow us to better understand cultures that have more than 2 genders.

Second, you're making the same mistake you're accusing me of. Berdache is a French word that has been imposed upon the natives. Yes, the French did not understand the Winkte or Nadle, which I've been calling "two spirit" to generalize to all Native groups, and so could only imagine them via their French culture: as prostitutes.

So you are claiming that we can only understand the third (and sometimes fourth) genders of Native American cultures through French eyes...

No, sorry. You're incorrect. They weren't prostitutes and they weren't treated badly. I gave you a better link already, we'll see if you read it.

Here's another:

http://books.google.co.jp/books...

“A sentient umbrella speaks”

Since: Mar 11

Some stable somewhere

#231564 Jul 1, 2014
Thinking wrote:
We'd also have the issue of emotional maturity to deal with.
It would seem likely that access to significant life extension would not begin as a universal right, it would probably be rationed by money and we could end up with some unpleasant hierarchical system to favour the near immortals to the exclusion of pretty much anyone else.
Followers of the abrahamic religions already accept a low tech version of this - so it's a really bad way of life.
Iain M Banks wrote stories about really extreme sports, such as lava surfing. If the participant died, they'd get a new body and retrieve the last backup of their personality and experiences. He also wrote about sentient spaceships that would backup their personalities to the cloud before going into combat. Sometimes the original hadn't actually died and the two resultant beings would be slightly different because of the experiential gap to their last backup.
<quoted text>
That's neat. I like thinking about such possibilities.

I tried to read one of his books, but it was miserable and without point. If you like him, I probably just choose an off book of his. I mean, he's won all kinds of prizes and is well respected in sci-fi. But, wow, was that book awful!

“A sentient umbrella speaks”

Since: Mar 11

Some stable somewhere

#231565 Jul 1, 2014
ChristineM wrote:
Nope still the same extended character set – sorry, I can’t see a way round this so in English
I love you long time
Thanks! I tried to put kanji to topix once. Same response as you - doesn't work. They probably just can't recognize the fonts.

“When you treat people as they ”

Since: Nov 10

treat you they get offended.

#231566 Jul 1, 2014
Hidingfromyou wrote:
<quoted text>
Thanks! I tried to put kanji to topix once. Same response as you - doesn't work. They probably just can't recognize the fonts.
We live and learn.
Thinking

Poole, UK

#231567 Jul 1, 2014
Out of interest, which one?

Often with M Banks, I found it was the method of travel which was glorious, not the destination.

One of ChristineM and my favourite books is Banks' Excession. I've previously argued it was pointless, didn't have an ending but somehow I just loved being inside it. ChristineM has a totally different opinion on the ending, btw.

M Banks also played nasty tricks, like writing 25% of a book phonetically purely to harass ChristineM.

I'm off to Zamiba and Botswana on Saturday and think I will reread M Banks while I'm on safari out there.
Hidingfromyou wrote:
<quoted text>
That's neat. I like thinking about such possibilities.
I tried to read one of his books, but it was miserable and without point. If you like him, I probably just choose an off book of his. I mean, he's won all kinds of prizes and is well respected in sci-fi. But, wow, was that book awful!

“A sentient umbrella speaks”

Since: Mar 11

Some stable somewhere

#231568 Jul 1, 2014
Thinking wrote:
Out of interest, which one?
Often with M Banks, I found it was the method of travel which was glorious, not the destination.
One of ChristineM and my favourite books is Banks' Excession. I've previously argued it was pointless, didn't have an ending but somehow I just loved being inside it. ChristineM has a totally different opinion on the ending, btw.
M Banks also played nasty tricks, like writing 25% of a book phonetically purely to harass ChristineM.
I'm off to Zamiba and Botswana on Saturday and think I will reread M Banks while I'm on safari out there.
<quoted text>
The Algerbraist.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Algebraist

blach! It is terrible.

Apparently it got awards, though, which just goes to tell you about awards people.

:X

Hey, what are you doing in Botswana and Zambia?!?

Cool stuff!

“It's Time. . .”

Since: Jun 13

New Holland

#231569 Jul 1, 2014
KiMare wrote:
<quoted text>
<quoted text>
You are right, I am confused about which word you claim is a translation, because 'two-spirit' is not.
You're just confused, period.
KiMare wrote:
Here is the literal translation; "Other scholars use specific native terms, such as winkte (from Lakota) or nadle (from Navajo), or else use a literal translation, such as "man-woman," of a native word."
Which brings us to your other claim:
<quoted text>
"a man who adopts the dress and social roles traditionally assigned to women.
[1800–10; < North American French; French bardache boy prostitute."
A man who dresses like a prostitute and is passed around is not an abused transgendered person?
Your PC twirl is making you stupid.
Smile.
You can't read a simple dictionary definition, so that makes her stupid?! Your fundie twirl, Bucket of Rocks.

“It's Time. . .”

Since: Jun 13

New Holland

#231570 Jul 1, 2014
ChristineM wrote:
<quoted text>
I really do like green tea. I know a restaurant where one of the chefs specialties is green tea soup with angel hair vermicelli and shredded duck spring rolls. It is wonderful.
Ahh you just reminded me, yup I’m hopeless at Chinese too – I learned some basics for a series of meetings I had, it turned out everyone spoke English so I never needed it. I am so glad too, because I found out later that the guy I was learning from was a bit of a comic, what I thought was “good to see you” turned out to be “I love you”
What do you call a Chinese cat?

Chairman Miaow

“It's Time. . .”

Since: Jun 13

New Holland

#231571 Jul 1, 2014
ChristineM wrote:
<quoted text>
We are having far more serious storms and floods over the last few years than since records began.
Actually this year has not been too bad in that respect (yet) but certainly the weather is far less predictable than it was.
I have relatives in Queensland and they have mentioned some of the storms you guys are getting recently.
It's a worry. At least the EU is doing something about it, unlike our clown of a prime minister.

Queensland has always been susceptible to cyclones, which is a part of being in such a tropical climate. It's fabulously warm up there while we shiver.

“When you treat people as they ”

Since: Nov 10

treat you they get offended.

#231572 Jul 1, 2014
Thinking wrote:
Out of interest, which one?
Often with M Banks, I found it was the method of travel which was glorious, not the destination.
One of ChristineM and my favourite books is Banks' Excession. I've previously argued it was pointless, didn't have an ending but somehow I just loved being inside it. ChristineM has a totally different opinion on the ending, btw.
M Banks also played nasty tricks, like writing 25% of a book phonetically purely to harass ChristineM.
I'm off to Zamiba and Botswana on Saturday and think I will reread M Banks while I'm on safari out there.
<quoted text>
The book I had serious problems with was Feersum Endjin – all the other “M” books are pretty damned good, Excession being way out there among the best books I have ever read.

It’s without the M that I find less entertaining, I did love “The Crow Road” and “Transitions”. Just read Stonemouth, well written, but predictable, I knew how it was going to end by the middle of chapter one and it left me unsatisfied.

Enjoy your trip. What is the book of choice?

“It's Time. . .”

Since: Jun 13

New Holland

#231573 Jul 1, 2014
Thinking wrote:
We'd also have the issue of emotional maturity to deal with.
It would seem likely that access to significant life extension would not begin as a universal right, it would probably be rationed by money and we could end up with some unpleasant hierarchical system to favour the near immortals to the exclusion of pretty much anyone else.
Followers of the abrahamic religions already accept a low tech version of this - so it's a really bad way of life.
Iain M Banks wrote stories about really extreme sports, such as lava surfing. If the participant died, they'd get a new body and retrieve the last backup of their personality and experiences. He also wrote about sentient spaceships that would backup their personalities to the cloud before going into combat. Sometimes the original hadn't actually died and the two resultant beings would be slightly different because of the experiential gap to their last backup.
<quoted text>
The only book of his I've read is Espedair Street.

“When you treat people as they ”

Since: Nov 10

treat you they get offended.

#231574 Jul 1, 2014
Hidingfromyou wrote:
<quoted text>
The Algerbraist.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Algebraist
blach! It is terrible.
Apparently it got awards, though, which just goes to tell you about awards people.
:X
Hey, what are you doing in Botswana and Zambia?!?
Cool stuff!
To me that was the worst of the “M” books, really quite boring

“It's Time. . .”

Since: Jun 13

New Holland

#231575 Jul 1, 2014
Hidingfromyou wrote:
<quoted text>
Yeah, Christian culture. Here it was a mixture of the gov't desiring to modernize and adopt capitalism. And lots of parts of Japanese culture meshed - like patriarchy, men working outside the home, etc. The Western mode of capitalism was men work, women take care of the house - not so different than men as heads of households and everyone else under.
The gov't simply decided to formalize that through developing a family register system, patralineage, men working, etc. At the same time, women still largely run the household budgets - right up to now! They tried to implement Western patriarchy, but it ended up mixing with Japanese culture.
So the gov't had active programs to "stop" same sex sexual behavior. For example, everyone knew it went on in all boy or all girl schools - headmasters wrote about such issues. Prior to the gov't forcing change, people just thought of such activities as trivial time wasting - like if you were to stay home from work just to play asteroids all day or something. Anyways, after the change schools adopted policies of "if you have to leave teenagers alone, make sure there is an odd number of them. The odd one out will run to tell the schoolmaster about any sexual activity" hahaha.
And of course, publications of shudo (romantic books on "the way of loving boys" - by and for men) ceased and was culturally tied to the past. Modernizing, Japan had no time for the sexual proclivities of samurai and monks.
There are a few parts of Japan that still see same sex sexual behavior as trivial and normal - like "just a phase." So the history lingers on, despite changes to society.
Interesting stuff. So we would have been bringing our culture over there at the time of the American occupation of Japan.

And yet our culture has changed so much since the War and the 50s. The whole idea of the traditional family from that era, remains only on shows like Leave It to Beaver.

As for the gays, why should their “secret men’s business” be anyone else’s business?

“When you treat people as they ”

Since: Nov 10

treat you they get offended.

#231576 Jul 1, 2014
Rosa_Winkel wrote:
<quoted text>
It's a worry. At least the EU is doing something about it, unlike our clown of a prime minister.
Queensland has always been susceptible to cyclones, which is a part of being in such a tropical climate. It's fabulously warm up there while we shiver.
It’s like a monkey p|ssing in a river while smugly saying ‘every bit helps’. Europe is small fry compared to the pollution produced by the US, China and India.

“When you treat people as they ”

Since: Nov 10

treat you they get offended.

#231577 Jul 1, 2014
Rosa_Winkel wrote:
<quoted text>
The only book of his I've read is Espedair Street.
That was not a bad book.
Thinking

Poole, UK

#231578 Jul 1, 2014
That's difficult... it's going to be a Culture novel though. I love the Culture.

Consider Phlebas was my first, I might read that again. The Player of Games and Use of Weapons have such amazing and memorable endings that they're not going to be so impactful second time around.

Look to Windward had the largest emotional effect on me. I felt so sorry for the Mind, and I might read Excession again because it makes me laugh most of all.

So which one? I'm just going to load them all onto my phone, iPad, Kindle and choose when I get there. There won't be much in the electricity for about a week so hopefully at least the Kindle will keep working. I've got a small solar panel and there will be an inverter in the 4x4, but that's it.
ChristineM wrote:
<quoted text>
The book I had serious problems with was Feersum Endjin – all the other “M” books are pretty damned good, Excession being way out there among the best books I have ever read.
It’s without the M that I find less entertaining, I did love “The Crow Road” and “Transitions”. Just read Stonemouth, well written, but predictable, I knew how it was going to end by the middle of chapter one and it left me unsatisfied.
Enjoy your trip. What is the book of choice?
Thinking

Poole, UK

#231579 Jul 1, 2014
I never finished that one. I prefer his Culture books. I will give it another go, though.

Cool stuff, indeed. We're following a migration route in Botswana, mainly in the Okavango delta. Some of it by dugout canoe, some of it by 4x4. Our camp will move each day. Then we'll spend a couple of days at Victoria Falls in Zambia. I love Africa. I haven't been to either country before, which is always a bonus.
Hidingfromyou wrote:
<quoted text>
The Algerbraist.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Algebraist
blach! It is terrible.
Apparently it got awards, though, which just goes to tell you about awards people.
:X
Hey, what are you doing in Botswana and Zambia?!?
Cool stuff!

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