Police veteran to say goodbye

Full story: The Reporter 26
After 23 years with the Fairfield Police Department, Lt. Tony Shipp is set to retire next month. Full Story
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Max

Santa Rosa, CA

#1 Apr 28, 2008
How come we never hear of anybody with a government job retiring after age 55?
Jay

United States

#2 Apr 28, 2008
Max, I was a police officer for almost 20 years when injuries sidelined me.... However I personally know many officers working into their 60's. Would you want the officer responding to your house where a burglar is breaking in to be eligible for medicare?
john wise

Buffalo, TX

#3 Apr 28, 2008
hey max. when you have been shot at, spit on,called the most vile names known to man you are not through. you work ungodly hours, most hollidays and usually know someone personally who gives his life in the line of duty because some punks mommy spanked him once when he was three. after 30 years of of unselfish service, don't you think lt. shipp deerves to spend some time with his family ? i do. i'm a 28 yr. veteran of the fairfield police dept. and feel that he has done enough.

Since: Mar 08

Berkeley, CA

#4 Apr 28, 2008
Max wrote:
How come we never hear of anybody with a government job retiring after age 55?
That is a very good question, Max.
Charlie-Arkansas

Springdale, AR

#5 Apr 28, 2008
Max,
What age do you advise a police officer should retire? Please share your wisdom with the rest of us. If your advise is as shoddy as the advise you gave to your client, "Forclosures take money from neighbors," please keep it to your self. The following is a quoate from you, "I have a client that made over $500,000 in 2006. In 2007 he made less than $20,000. The problem is , he, like many others never took money off the table and left it all the in real estate pot. Today he has a day job wishing he had kept some of that money for times like this. Most people that speculate don't understand that putting some money aside into a very secure investment is wise. Good times never last forever. My client is learning this now."

I bet your client wishes he were a police office with a retirement. He wouldn't have to listen to the like of you.



Since: Mar 08

Berkeley, CA

#6 Apr 28, 2008
Charlie-Arkansas wrote:
Max,
What age do you advise a police officer should retire? Please share your wisdom with the rest of us. If your advise is as shoddy as the advise you gave to your client, "Forclosures take money from neighbors," please keep it to your self. The following is a quoate from you, "I have a client that made over $500,000 in 2006. In 2007 he made less than $20,000. The problem is , he, like many others never took money off the table and left it all the in real estate pot. Today he has a day job wishing he had kept some of that money for times like this. Most people that speculate don't understand that putting some money aside into a very secure investment is wise. Good times never last forever. My client is learning this now."
I bet your client wishes he were a police office with a retirement. He wouldn't have to listen to the like of you.
There should definitely be a minimum age for police officers. Most people who are under 25 years old simply do not have the maturity to be police officers. The maximum age is much less relevant.
Max

Santa Rosa, CA

#7 Apr 28, 2008
Jay wrote:
Max, I was a police officer for almost 20 years when injuries sidelined me.... However I personally know many officers working into their 60's. Would you want the officer responding to your house where a burglar is breaking in to be eligible for medicare?
That's fine with me as long as they're physically fit. I'd rather have a 65 year old fit police officer respond to a burglary than a 40 year old obese police officer who can't climb a fence to fence to grab the perp.

Personally, at 52 years old, I am confident that between my fit health and my buddies Smith and Wesson, we could handle it until VPD arrived.
Max

Santa Rosa, CA

#8 Apr 28, 2008
john wise wrote:
hey max. when you have been shot at, spit on,called the most vile names known to man you are not through. you work ungodly hours, most hollidays and usually know someone personally who gives his life in the line of duty because some punks mommy spanked him once when he was three. after 30 years of of unselfish service, don't you think lt. shipp deerves to spend some time with his family ? i do. i'm a 28 yr. veteran of the fairfield police dept. and feel that he has done enough.
Well. I have experience some of those things. I may have experience some of the verbal abuse you mention as well but I don't speak Arabic, Tagalog or Spanish so I don't know for sure.

I imagine being a POlice officer is much like being a soldier; it's a young man's profession.

Interestingly you mention LT Shipp. I never mentioned his name. My observation is about all government employees who always seem to retire at about age 55.
Max

Santa Rosa, CA

#9 Apr 28, 2008
Charlie-Arkansas wrote:
Max,
What age do you advise a police officer should retire? Please share your wisdom with the rest of us. If your advise is as shoddy as the advise you gave to your client, "Forclosures take money from neighbors," please keep it to your self. The following is a quoate from you, "I have a client that made over $500,000 in 2006. In 2007 he made less than $20,000. The problem is , he, like many others never took money off the table and left it all the in real estate pot. Today he has a day job wishing he had kept some of that money for times like this. Most people that speculate don't understand that putting some money aside into a very secure investment is wise. Good times never last forever. My client is learning this now."
I bet your client wishes he were a police office with a retirement. He wouldn't have to listen to the like of you.
My client's profession is unrelated to his business with me. His fortunes are of his own doing and are a result of no advise from me.

Interesting how you assume that know everything.

You wanted my opinion so here it is. POlice officers should retired at age 65 and maintain physical fitness throughout their career. Semi annual physical fitness testing should be manditory with emphasis on the BMI, strength, flexibility, and endurance. This along with whatever professional testing is necessary should be required by all POlice officers.

If implemented you'd see greater job satisfaction and less work related injury saving taxpayers money. You'd also see less demand for new POlice officers at a time when agencies can not find qualified recruits.

Full retirement should not be available until age 65 either.

Anything else Charles?
Charlie-Arkansas

Springdale, AR

#11 Apr 28, 2008
Max,
I agree with you on the retirement age. A person should be able to work as long as they are able to perform the required duties and are of sound mind and body, however, P.E.R.S. sets the retiremnt age of fifty years old for public satety employees. You may opt to stay longer. If you are interested in peace officer requirements go to; www.post.ca.gov/ click on hiring.

As far as your client goes you bought that up, not I. I would never talk about one of my clients affairs. It's no one elses business. Thank you for clarifying, "His fortunes are of his own doing and are a result of no advise from me." Now, I know more than I did before."
Max

Santa Rosa, CA

#12 Apr 28, 2008
Charlie-Arkansas wrote:
Max,
I agree with you on the retirement age. A person should be able to work as long as they are able to perform the required duties and are of sound mind and body, however, P.E.R.S. sets the retiremnt age of fifty years old for public satety employees. You may opt to stay longer. If you are interested in peace officer requirements go to; www.post.ca.gov/ click on hiring.
As far as your client goes you bought that up, not I. I would never talk about one of my clients affairs. It's no one elses business. Thank you for clarifying, "His fortunes are of his own doing and are a result of no advise from me." Now, I know more than I did before."
The client is anonymous and doesn't live around here. There is no reason why Calpers can't change either.
Charlie-Arkansas

Springdale, AR

#13 Apr 28, 2008
Good one, Max. us ole country boys have to turn in it's 2 hours later here, gotta feed the chickens in the morning at sun up.
Vacavillian

San Francisco, CA

#14 Apr 28, 2008
Actually, it is in the departments best interest to allow retirement at 50. It is documented that the older a worker gets the more opportunity for injury and disability and thus a worker's comp claim. Better to be done with it and move on to newer workers. I am glad my husband can retire at 50 he started at 21 and will be fully vested at 90% of his salary by 50 years old. If he stays longer it won't mean any more money monthly. Don't hate because there is a perk to the job. I have two young kids and we put up with him gone 12 hours a day, sleeping during the day, works weekends, holidays, etc. if you want to retire at 50 go put your self through the grueling academy and then you can experience one perk of the job. They are talking of lowering the age of retirement to 45 looking forward to that if it happens.
Max

Santa Rosa, CA

#15 Apr 29, 2008
Vacavillian wrote:
Actually, it is in the departments best interest to allow retirement at 50. It is documented that the older a worker gets the more opportunity for injury and disability and thus a worker's comp claim. Better to be done with it and move on to newer workers. I am glad my husband can retire at 50 he started at 21 and will be fully vested at 90% of his salary by 50 years old. If he stays longer it won't mean any more money monthly. Don't hate because there is a perk to the job. I have two young kids and we put up with him gone 12 hours a day, sleeping during the day, works weekends, holidays, etc. if you want to retire at 50 go put your self through the grueling academy and then you can experience one perk of the job. They are talking of lowering the age of retirement to 45 looking forward to that if it happens.
Show me the stats of physically fit POlice officers on the job after age 50 and we can discuss this further. Right now my observation is that POlice officers for the most part get fatter as they age. Less fit, more prone to work related injury. The connection is obvious.
Charlie-Arkansas

Springdale, AR

#16 Apr 29, 2008
Come on Max, Do you retire them at 50 or 65? This latest statement conflicts with your earlier statement, "greater job satisfication and less work related injury saving taxpayers money." As far as implementation of out of shape officers goes it is already in place. It's called forced retirement. How many fat out of shape 65 year old officers do you see running around?

Since: Feb 08

Vacaville

#17 Apr 29, 2008
"I have two young kids and we put up with him gone 12 hours a day, sleeping during the day, works weekends, holidays, etc"

I am a little tired of hearing about the long hours and time spent away from family. There are plenty of other professions that take a parent out of the home for hours a day, weekends, blah blah. Yes, what the cops do is "dangerous" and they are putting their lives on the line, yadda yadda, but they were fully aware of this when they signed up. Being a cop does not make a person an automatic hero. It is what kind of cop they turn out to be.
Max

Santa Rosa, CA

#18 Apr 29, 2008
Charlie-Arkansas wrote:
Come on Max, Do you retire them at 50 or 65? This latest statement conflicts with your earlier statement, "greater job satisfication and less work related injury saving taxpayers money." As far as implementation of out of shape officers goes it is already in place. It's called forced retirement. How many fat out of shape 65 year old officers do you see running around?
I suppose it's self fulfilling in that respect. But if a POlice officer is forced retired, a lesser retirement package is appropriate.
Charlie-Arkansas

Springdale, AR

#19 Apr 29, 2008
In reality, that's not true. It becomes a disability retirement with the disability portion tax free. Then under most circumstances the person becomes eligiable for disability social security and after two years on social security the person can receive medi-care benifits. Tell me, how is this a lesser retirement package?
john wise

Buffalo, TX

#20 Apr 29, 2008
hey max. How fit are you? and be honest.

“Oblabla - You Lie”

Since: Jan 08

Richmond to Buddy

#21 Apr 29, 2008
Christine-Vacaville excellent comment (#17) and I agree totally. That could have well been a description of myself when working the Oil Refineries for 30 years. With the exception of I was working in a much more dangerous enviorment.

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