Tom Brady is Overrated

Full story: Dr. U

Tom Brady of the New England Patriots is the most overrated quarterback in the NFL.
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TMD

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#10132
Jan 4, 2013
 

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Bewitched wrote:
So, will the AFC Championship be played in Denver should that scenario play out?
A Brady/Manning match up just for you and I. lol
Yeah, just like old times. If it happens they will be playing at Mile High. Oughta be one for the ages.

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Oh, almost forgot ... Browns are working up a deal right now with Chip Kelly of Oregon for the Head Coach position. They must have made him an offer he couldn't refuse.
Great pickup. I think he'll bring some fresh, new ideas to the table. I'm looking forward to seeing the Kelly era in Cleveland. I think this could be the renaissance of Colt McCoy.

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#10133
Jan 4, 2013
 

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TMD wrote:
<quoted text>
Yeah, just like old times. If it happens they will be playing at Mile High. Oughta be one for the ages.
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<quoted text>
Great pickup. I think he'll bring some fresh, new ideas to the table. I'm looking forward to seeing the Kelly era in Cleveland. I think this could be the renaissance of Colt McCoy.
Are you thinking it's going to be an air show, like I am? Pats' D is going to have to show up big time, should this one come about.

I hope Kelly is the right one! It's been ridiculous going through new coaches, and QB controversies so often. There was high hopes when Holmgren came to town, but he didn't do much except take the money and run. New owner Jimmy Haslam is very well liked around here, and it looks like Joe Banner has pulled one over on his former Eagles' owner with the Kelly signing.(not official yet) I like Trent Richardson quite a bit. I gave my son in law an autographed Upper Deck rookie card of the RB for Christmas. Not sure what's going to happen with Weeden or McCoy. Wouldn't surprise me one bit if they use up a draft pick on another QB! lol

TMD

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#10134
Jan 4, 2013
 

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flbadcatowner wrote:
<quoted text>Parcells left after a championship season with the Giants. He certainly was not pushed out.
No, but he was in New England after trying to sneak out to join the Jets. He's a real piece of work.

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Jim Johnson simply did not see eye to eye with an owner.
If he hadn't left he would have been fired. Jones had grown tired of fighting with him over who should get credit for the success of the team. There just wasn't room in the Dallas boardroom for two alpha males.

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and for every Pete Carroll, there are many Bill Arnspargers and Ray Handleys. Even a great coach could be a wrong fit for a certain team.
Yep. That's why you need to hire a good/great GM to figure out before hand if a perspective HC fits the organization.

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Landry just suffered from a lack of horses to do the job and not coaching methods.
Landry was a cutting edge defensive coach in his day, but he progressively fell farther and farther behind newer offensive methods despite having great talent on the last 3 teams he coached, including Danny White, Tony Dorsett, Michael Irving, Mike Renfro, Tim Newsome, and Herschel Walker. It was a sad thing to watch.

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And how can a coaches methods suddenly become obsolete in just one season after the same methods won a Super Bowl the year before?
Easily. What got you to the SB last year didn't even get you to the playoffs this year.

The Giants have been on the playoff bubble the past 4 years, in which they have won their division once and missed the playoffs THREE times. That would put any coach on the hot seat.
Amazed

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Jan 4, 2013
 

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To see a conversation last 4 6 years. And yes, in the begging Brady was overrated, but he has come a long way. Now, he is one of the all time greats. If NewEngland reaches the superbowl,i wish them the best.

TMD

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#10136
Jan 4, 2013
 

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Bewitched wrote:
<quoted text>
Are you thinking it's going to be an air show, like I am? Pats' D is going to have to show up big time, should this one come about.
You got it! Manning and Brady are going to light it up, severely testing both defenses. These games can't start soon enough...
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I hope Kelly is the right one! It's been ridiculous going through new coaches, and QB controversies so often. There was high hopes when Holmgren came to town, but he didn't do much except take the money and run. New owner Jimmy Haslam is very well liked around here, and it looks like Joe Banner has pulled one over on his former Eagles' owner with the Kelly signing.(not official yet)
I was crossing my fingers for you when I heard Kelly was in the running for the Cleveland job. I was afraid he would take the Philly position. Both clubs have enough talent to take off running, however, I really like the new Browns' owner, too. Haslam seems like a no-nonsense kind of guy without taking himself too seriously. Cleveland may finally get a shot at another championship after almost 50 years without one.

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I like Trent Richardson quite a bit. I gave my son in law an autographed Upper Deck rookie card of the RB for Christmas. Not sure what's going to happen with Weeden or McCoy. Wouldn't surprise me one bit if they use up a draft pick on another QB! lol
Richardson is the real deal. I wish the Colts could get a back like him.

If Cleveland drafts another QB when they already have McCoy, Weeden, and Lewis, I'm going to scream!

“I call it as I see it.”

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#10137
Jan 5, 2013
 

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TMD wrote:
<quoted text>
No, but he was in New England after trying to sneak out to join the Jets. He's a real piece of work.
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<quoted text>
If he hadn't left he would have been fired. Jones had grown tired of fighting with him over who should get credit for the success of the team. There just wasn't room in the Dallas boardroom for two alpha males.
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<quoted text>
Yep. That's why you need to hire a good/great GM to figure out before hand if a perspective HC fits the organization.
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<quoted text>
Landry was a cutting edge defensive coach in his day, but he progressively fell farther and farther behind newer offensive methods despite having great talent on the last 3 teams he coached, including Danny White, Tony Dorsett, Michael Irving, Mike Renfro, Tim Newsome, and Herschel Walker. It was a sad thing to watch.
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<quoted text>
Easily. What got you to the SB last year didn't even get you to the playoffs this year.
The Giants have been on the playoff bubble the past 4 years, in which they have won their division once and missed the playoffs THREE times. That would put any coach on the hot seat.
Johnson and Parcells certainly didn't depart because they couldn't get the job done. I will agree that Parcells is not the greatest when it comes to loyalty and the way he kept the Giants in limbo before quitting as a coach after his second Super Bowl win and disrupting the whole organization in the process made it harder for his sucessor. When Parcells wanted to come back to the Giants years later, the Giants said "no thanks." Parcell's dawdling over whether to quit or not also ruined their chances of elevating their then defensive coordinator Bill Belichick to the head coaching position as Belichick had by that time left to become head coach the Browns (where he was fired because the team wasn't winning through no fault of his own).

The Cowboys certainly needed an overhaul of personnel in Landry's final season as head coach. That was the GM's fault and not Landry's. The year after Landry was fired, the Cowboys went 1-15 under J.J. which shows that the Cowboys had gotten old under Landry and could no longer perform the magic of previous seasons under him, much like with Allie Sherman in 1964 with the Giants. A disastrous trade and a flopped first round draft choice didn't help Sherman either and trading away many draft picks for nearly washed up veterans hampered Sherman is his quest to rebuild the team in his later years as coach for which he was conveniently made a scapegoat.

Just for the record, the Giants are reputed to have on of the more complicated offenses in football and are no slouches at innovation. It takes a very alert Qb to run such an offense and I have seen some games where Eli seemed to be in a fog and making poorly advised throws. I was at one time blaming Kevin Gilbride, their offensive coordinator, but now I am having second thoughts. Most of the charges of predictable play-calling are likely from less knowledgeable sources who have to say something rather than have something to say. Coughlin got the job done one season earlier and you give up on him one season later after injuries and inconsistent play by Manning bogged the Giants down. It makes no sense.

“I call it as I see it.”

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#10138
Jan 5, 2013
 

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TMD wrote:
<quoted text>
I just think Coughlin and his team have run out of fresh ideas. It's time for a change.
The Giants are not lacking in creativity according to this article:

s
Kevin Gilbride's 'option' offense in passing game fuels NY Giants
On offense, Giants are keeping their options open
Comments (8)
By Ralph Vacchiano / NEW YORK DAILY NEWS
Published: Saturday, January 28, 2012, 4:49 PM
Updated: Saturday, January 28, 2012, 5:42 PM

Offensive coordinator Kevin Gilbride (l.) is the architect of the most prolific offensive system in Giants history.

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The hands clap and the huddle breaks and the receivers jog out to their positions. Kevin Gilbride has already relayed the play to Eli Manning, but the receivers still have no idea where they’re going to go.

That’s part of the beauty of the Gilbride offense. Everything the receivers do is based on what happens next. Is there man-to-man coverage or a zone? Which way are the safeties shading? Are the corners pressing on the line or leaving a cushion?

Then, when the ball is snapped and the defense goes in motion, everything could change...again.

“Yeah, it’s definitely tough,” says receiver Victor Cruz.“It’s one of the biggest things I had to adjust to, learning how to read coverages and adjust mid-route. We had a few read-routes in college, but nothing to this extent where it’s 15 yards down field and you have to make an adjustment. Sometimes they may line up one way, then when the ball comes they move to somewhere else. So you have to see all of that.”

It’s a demanding system. It can be confusing. It can be frustrating, too, especially to a young player. It’s also explosive,“quarterback-friendl y,” potent, and the most prolific offensive system the Giants franchise has ever seen.

“That’s the beauty of it,” says backup quarterback David Carr.“When we’re rolling, it’s hard to stop.”

That’s what the 60-year-old Gilbride has created in his eighth season with the Giants and fifth since taking over as the offensive coordinator. He’s helped turn Eli Manning from an erratic, interception-prone quarterback into a near-5,000-yard passer. He’s built an offensive machine that has rallied from six fourth-quarter deficits this year. It can strike so quickly, the Giants never feel like they’re out of a game.

And he’s done that with a rebuilding offensive line, the 32nd-ranked rushing attack in the league, and a tight end (Jake Ballard) and star receiver (Victor Cruz) who had never had a single catch in the NFL before this year.

Manning gets all the credit, and much of it is deserved. But it’s not like he’s on the field drawing up plays in the dirt.

“Eli’s playing so well and that’s a tribute to Kevin,” says former Giants quarterbacks coach Chris Palmer, who is now the offensive coordinator with the Tennessee Titans.“The guy is an outstanding football coach and does a great job. What is perceived about him and what is real is not necessarily one and the same. Kevin should get a lot of credit for the success they’ve had this year.”

Ask anyone in the locker room, and Gilbride does get the credit. Tom Coughlin praises his ability as a teacher and his players praise his patience and the way he calls a game. It drives them crazy that he’s a target for angry fans, who sometimes call him “Killdrive” when games don’t go the Giants’ way.

He’s always had a reputation problem, though, dating back to his days running the run-and-shoot offense with the Houston Oilers (1990-94). Gilbride got a label he couldn’t shake when former Oilers defensive coordinator Buddy Ryan famously called his wide-open passing attack the “chuck-and-duck” and then even more famously when Rex’s dad tried to punch him on the sidelines in the middle of a game.

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/football/gi...

TMD

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Jan 5, 2013
 

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flbadcatowner wrote:
<quoted text>Manning has also been bailed out by great catches of not so well thrown balls and has also had his share of failures to convert when the game was on the line. A few of his comeback wins would have been unnecessary if he was on his game for four quarters and not just the closing minutes. If Brady has fewer comeback wins, it is because he rarely falls behind from inconsistent play in the first place as often as Manning does.
Did anybody say anything about comeback wins? NO.
Did anybody say Manning was a better QB than Brady? NO.

I said Manning is the best big game QB in the league. Period.

You may continue reposting and rehashing this point as much as you like. I'm finished discussing this with you.

TMD

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Jan 5, 2013
 

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flbadcatowner wrote:
<quoted text>Johnson and Parcells certainly didn't depart because they couldn't get the job done.
This is not your original premise.

You said it was illogical for a SB winning coach to be replaced. I responded by citing examples of just such events. Now you want to cherry pick which coaches on the list I provided to you that you feel were unfairly booted while ignoring the rest. It doesn't change the fact that SB winning coaches have been replaced. That is the nature of the NFL.

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I will agree that Parcells is not the greatest when it comes to loyalty and the way he kept the Giants in limbo before quitting as a coach after his second Super Bowl win and disrupting the whole organization in the process made it harder for his sucessor. When Parcells wanted to come back to the Giants years later, the Giants said "no thanks." Parcell's dawdling over whether to quit or not also ruined their chances of elevating their then defensive coordinator Bill Belichick to the head coaching position as Belichick had by that time left to become head coach the Browns (where he was fired because the team wasn't winning through no fault of his own).

I'm not sure why you included all this detail about Parcells and the Giants. As previously stated, I was referring to his departure from New England. Belichick has never been fired after winning a SB as an HC so I'm not sure why you even mentioned him. He's not part of this discussion.

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[QUOTE]The Cowboys certainly needed an overhaul of personnel in Landry's final season as head coach. That was the GM's fault and not Landry's. The year after Landry was fired, the Cowboys went 1-15 under J.J. which shows that the Cowboys had gotten old under Landry and could no longer perform the magic of previous seasons under him, much like with Allie Sherman in 1964 with the Giants. A disastrous trade and a flopped first round draft choice didn't help Sherman either and trading away many draft picks for nearly washed up veterans hampered Sherman is his quest to rebuild the team in his later years as coach for which he was conveniently made a scapegoat.
The last team Landry coached in '88 was plenty good enough to do better than 3-13. Landry's play calling was one of the primary reason that team did so poorly. He, and the OC were constantly fighting. He was no longer an effective manager. It was time for him to go.

JJ's '89 roster was a complete overhaul and rebuild to fit his coaching style and philosophy. One of the biggest reasons the '89 team did so poorly was because of a rookie QB named Aikman who couldn't grasp the sophisticated playbook. The next season Johnson had the playbook SIGNIFICANTLY simplified, and that's when Aikman became a force to be reckoned with.

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Just for the record, the Giants are reputed to have on of the more complicated offenses in football and are no slouches at innovation. It takes a very alert Qb to run such an offense and I have seen some games where Eli seemed to be in a fog and making poorly advised throws. I was at one time blaming Kevin Gilbride, their offensive coordinator, but now I am having second thoughts. Most of the charges of predictable play-calling are likely from less knowledgeable sources who have to say something rather than have something to say.
Every team in the league thinks they have "one of the most complex offenses in football". Whether Eli Manning runs the Giants' offense as well as it can be run is pure conjecture.

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Coughlin got the job done one season earlier and you give up on him one season later after injuries and inconsistent play by Manning bogged the Giants down. It makes no sense.
I don't know how many times you have to hear this, but Coughlin has been on the hot seat since '07, not last year. The fans and media were calling for his head back then. The level of discontent has started ramping up again. This is not something that just happened this season.

TMD

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Jan 5, 2013
 

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flbadcatowner wrote:
<quoted text>
The Giants are not lacking in creativity according to this article:

The hands clap and the huddle breaks and the receivers jog out to their positions. Kevin Gilbride has already relayed the play to Eli Manning, but the receivers still have no idea where they’re going to go.
That’s part of the beauty of the Gilbride offense. Everything the receivers do is based on what happens next. Is there man-to-man coverage or a zone? Which way are the safeties shading? Are the corners pressing on the line or leaving a cushion?
Then, when the ball is snapped and the defense goes in motion, everything could change...again.
“Yeah, it’s definitely tough,” says receiver Victor Cruz.“It’s one of the biggest things I had to adjust to, learning how to read coverages and adjust mid-route. We had a few read-routes in college, but nothing to this extent where it’s 15 yards down field and you have to make an adjustment. Sometimes they may line up one way, then when the ball comes they move to somewhere else. So you have to see all of that.”
It’s a demanding system. It can be confusing. It can be frustrating, too, especially to a young player. It’s also explosive,“quarterback-friendl y,” potent, and the most prolific offensive system the Giants franchise has ever seen.
“That’s the beauty of it,” says backup quarterback David Carr.“When we’re rolling, it’s hard to stop.”
That’s what the 60-year-old Gilbride has created in his eighth season with the Giants and fifth since taking over as the offensive coordinator. He’s helped turn Eli Manning from an erratic, interception-prone quarterback into a near-5,000-yard passer. He’s built an offensive machine that has rallied from six fourth-quarter deficits this year. It can strike so quickly, the Giants never feel like they’re out of a game.
And he’s done that with a rebuilding offensive line, the 32nd-ranked rushing attack in the league, and a tight end (Jake Ballard) and star receiver (Victor Cruz) who had never had a single catch in the NFL before this year.
Manning gets all the credit, and much of it is deserved. But it’s not like he’s on the field drawing up plays in the dirt.
“Eli’s playing so well and that’s a tribute to Kevin,” says former Giants quarterbacks coach Chris Palmer, who is now the offensive coordinator with the Tennessee Titans.“The guy is an outstanding football coach and does a great job. What is perceived about him and what is real is not necessarily one and the same. Kevin should get a lot of credit for the success they’ve had this year.”
Ask anyone in the locker room, and Gilbride does get the credit. Tom Coughlin praises his ability as a teacher and his players praise his patience and the way he calls a game. It drives them crazy that he’s a target for angry fans, who sometimes call him “Killdrive” when games don’t go the Giants’ way.
He’s always had a reputation problem, though, dating back to his days running the run-and-shoot offense with the Houston Oilers (1990-94). Gilbride got a label he couldn’t shake when former Oilers defensive coordinator Buddy Ryan famously called his wide-open passing attack the “chuck-and-duck” and then even more famously when Rex’s dad tried to punch him on the sidelines in the middle of a game.
Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/sports/football/gi...
I'm not sure how this article helps your argument.

It basically says Manning is doing a great job and that a lot of the burden of the offense's success lies with the receivers reading the defense and making the correct adjustments.

It also says the offense is not as sophisticated as Gilbride thinks it is. At least, not to other teams.

My opinion is that every other team in the NFL has an offense with reads similar to the Giants'. There is nothing innovative there.

“I call it as I see it.”

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#10142
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TMD wrote:
<quoted text>
Did anybody say anything about comeback wins? NO.
Did anybody say Manning was a better QB than Brady? NO.
I said Manning is the best big game QB in the league. Period.
You may continue reposting and rehashing this point as much as you like. I'm finished discussing this with you.
Perhaps his "big games" seem so much bigger in contrast with his not so big games. I would feel just as confident with Rodgers, Brees, Big Ben or Brady as I would with Manning. Because they play for the full 60 minutes rather than ratchet it up for the closing minutes, they are less likely to need to engineer a come from behind win in the first place.

“I call it as I see it.”

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TMD wrote:
<quoted text>
This is not your original premise.
You said it was illogical for a SB winning coach to be replaced. I responded by citing examples of just such events. Now you want to cherry pick which coaches on the list I provided to you that you feel were unfairly booted while ignoring the rest. It doesn't change the fact that SB winning coaches have been replaced. That is the nature of the NFL.
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<quoted text>
The last team Landry coached in '88 was plenty good enough to do better than 3-13. Landry's play calling was one of the primary reason that team did so poorly. He, and the OC were constantly fighting. He was no longer an effective manager. It was time for him to go.
JJ's '89 roster was a complete overhaul and rebuild to fit his coaching style and philosophy. One of the biggest reasons the '89 team did so poorly was because of a rookie QB named Aikman who couldn't grasp the sophisticated playbook. The next season Johnson had the playbook SIGNIFICANTLY simplified, and that's when Aikman became a force to be reckoned with.
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<quoted text>
Every team in the league thinks they have "one of the most complex offenses in football". Whether Eli Manning runs the Giants' offense as well as it can be run is pure conjecture.
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<quoted text>
I don't know how many times you have to hear this, but Coughlin has been on the hot seat since '07, not last year. The fans and media were calling for his head back then. The level of discontent has started ramping up again. This is not something that just happened this season.
I believe it was stupid for the owner to let his ego get in the way of JJs success and not just let JJ take the credit. Nobody can fire an owner anyway. Show me a team that changes coaches often and I will show you a perennial loser. Coughlin has a winning record as a coach. He has also been the Giants best coach since Parcells. The problem is that fans listen to much to sportswriters who simply are looking for an excuse to stir the pot and won't listen to anything to the contrary spoken by people earning a living by coaching or being in the front office.

Let's give Coughlin his due where he was the first coach of an expansion team and had more success with Jacksonville in his 8 years with them than the great Tom Landry did in his first 8 seasons in Dallas. It took Landry 7 years to get over .500 for a season and only 2 for Coughlin who led Jacksonville to a 14-2 record in the Jaguar's 5th NFL season. Things came unhinged after that as salary cap constraints caused them to lose a good number of key players and Coughlin was made the scapegoat. He was 68-60 with a team he inherited as an expansion team for his 8 years in Jax and in the next 8 years, the team would win fewer games in spite of it being an established team and not an expansion team and has since sunk to a cumulative franchise all time mark of below .500.
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The Cowboys are going nowhere as long as Romo is the QB and Jones owns the team. Jimmy Johnson is the reason the Cowboys did so well after Jones fired him. He had built up such a team it took a few years for it to come apart. But it has.

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#10145
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TMD wrote:
<quoted text>

The last team Landry coached in '88 was plenty good enough to do better than 3-13. Landry's play calling was one of the primary reason that team did so poorly. He, and the OC were constantly fighting. He was no longer an effective manager. It was time for him to go.
JJ's '89 roster was a complete overhaul and rebuild to fit his coaching style and philosophy. One of the biggest reasons the '89 team did so poorly was because of a rookie QB named Aikman who couldn't grasp the sophisticated playbook. The next season Johnson had the playbook SIGNIFICANTLY simplified, and that's when Aikman became a force to be reckoned with.
Can't you see your own disconnect there where you said Landry's less sophisticated playbook was the cause of a bad season and then you partly blamed the Cowboys fall to 1-15 on JJ's too complicated playbook and then credited a simplified playbook for the Cowboys' improvement the next season? The problem was simple. The Cowboys got old in key positions under Landry and the team needed the overhaul that the new GM instituted. Had Landry gotten the horses he needed, I am sure he still could have won.

TMD

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flbadcatowner wrote:
<quoted text>I believe it was stupid for the owner to let his ego get in the way of JJs success and not just let JJ take the credit. Nobody can fire an owner anyway. Show me a team that changes coaches often and I will show you a perennial loser. Coughlin has a winning record as a coach. He has also been the Giants best coach since Parcells.
Coughlin may be the best coach the Giants have had since Parcells, but that doesn't make him the best available coach.

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The problem is that fans listen to much to sportswriters who simply are looking for an excuse to stir the pot and won't listen to anything to the contrary spoken by people earning a living by coaching or being in the front office.
Forgive me, but when is the last time a coach or his assistants admitted they were inadequate and asked to be fired or replaced?

If the fans and sportswriters don't hold a team's management accountable with regard to who they hire and how they run the team, who will?

When management/owners fall in love with a coach, they make bad decisions regarding that coach, and let them stick around far longer than they should. The Dallas Cowboys of the late '80s are a prime example of this. It took new ownership to finally clean house and hire fresh blood to resurrect a franchise that had been declining under Landry's tutelage for years.

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Let's give Coughlin his due where he was the first coach of an expansion team and had more success with Jacksonville in his 8 years with them than the great Tom Landry did in his first 8 seasons in Dallas. It took Landry 7 years to get over .500 for a season and only 2 for Coughlin who led Jacksonville to a 14-2 record in the Jaguar's 5th NFL season. Things came unhinged after that as salary cap constraints caused them to lose a good number of key players and Coughlin was made the scapegoat. He was 68-60 with a team he inherited as an expansion team for his 8 years in Jax and in the next 8 years, the team would win fewer games in spite of it being an established team and not an expansion team and has since sunk to a cumulative franchise all time mark of below .500.
At some point you have to stop making excuses for Coughlin and accept that the teams he coaches start tuning him out (as teams do with most coaches) after about 7 years. His song and dance has also worn thin with the GM and owners. Another no-playoff season in NY and he will be gone.

TMD

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flbadcatowner wrote:
<quoted text>Can't you see your own disconnect there where you said Landry's less sophisticated playbook was the cause of a bad season and then you partly blamed the Cowboys fall to 1-15 on JJ's too complicated playbook and then credited a simplified playbook for the Cowboys' improvement the next season? The problem was simple. The Cowboys got old in key positions under Landry and the team needed the overhaul that the new GM instituted. Had Landry gotten the horses he needed, I am sure he still could have won.
I didn't say Landry's playbook was the reason his late teams did poorly, I said it was his play-calling and methods. The OC couldn't stand him anymore because of it. There have been many veteran teams that posted better records than 3-13 with far less talent than Landry had to work with.

And, as I stated earler, the Cowboys biggest problem in JJ's first season was a rookie QB who couldn't grasp the playbook, not the plays, or play-calling. And the overhaul of the team was one of the conditions of JJ taking the job. He wanted players more tailored to his style of football, who had played in, and understood, a modern offense. It appears he knew what he was talking about.

TMD

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Bewitched wrote:
I don't think either of you are nuts. Can I change the subject since this is Wild Card Weekend coming up?... I just need a consensus from EVERYBODY as to who you all think is going to go on to play the Patriots!
Sam! I forgot that the formula that determines the schedule for playoff opponents in the divisional rounds is determined by high and low remaining seeds.

So, I'm still taking Indy over Baltimore. However the divisional game (which is another dream game for me) pits the old guard for the Colts (Manning) against the new face of the organization (Luck). I actually like the Colts' chances against the Broncos.

Manning has always had problems with Pagano's defenses (and 3-4 defenses, in general). Billed as the Battle of the Stallions, I think the game comes right down to the wire, with the Colts pulling it out.

We all know Cincy lost to the Texans (as I thought they would). So, the Texans have advanced to the divisional round where they will be promptly crushed by the Pats.

I think we end up with a rarity in the AFCC: A rookie QB and coach.

Indianapolis vs. New England

“I call it as I see it.”

Since: Jul 09

Retirement City

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#10149
Jan 6, 2013
 

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TMD wrote:
<quoted text>
I didn't say Landry's playbook was the reason his late teams did poorly, I said it was his play-calling and methods. The OC couldn't stand him anymore because of it. There have been many veteran teams that posted better records than 3-13 with far less talent than Landry had to work with.
And, as I stated earler, the Cowboys biggest problem in JJ's first season was a rookie QB who couldn't grasp the playbook, not the plays, or play-calling. And the overhaul of the team was one of the conditions of JJ taking the job. He wanted players more tailored to his style of football, who had played in, and understood, a modern offense. It appears he knew what he was talking about.
You are backtracking as the playbook srategy is the single biggest factor in an innovative offense. Your are not going to talk your way out of that one. and you just gave me a reason for not changing coaches unless he is just plain terrible like Ray Handley or Bill Arnsparger, or because they lost control of the players like Jim Fassel. because new coaching philosophies create the need for additional new players who will take time to jell as a unit (if they ever indeed do which is always a big if). Coughlin is a two time Super Bowl winner who was also surprisingly successful with a new expansion team and made the team by far and away the most successful expansion team in history for its first 8 seasons. The Giants need more new faces on defense as their defensive line is getting old, their line backing is only so-so and their defensive backfield is seriously with the exception of Kenny Hill when he is healthy and is the only consistent one of the bunch. With all the key injuries on both sides of the ball, it is remarkable that they didn't have a losing season. Coughlin deserves credit and not blame. As far as his relationship with the players is concerned, he is considered tough, but fair and he has mellowed into more of a player's coach in recent years after a star player confided to him that his too rigid style was alienating the players. Like Parcells, he is honest with his players and when he says something, the players can trust his word which leaves the players knowing exactly where they stand and what is expected of them.

Since: Apr 08

Akron, Ohio

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#10150
Jan 6, 2013
 

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TMD wrote:
<quoted text>
Sam! I forgot that the formula that determines the schedule for playoff opponents in the divisional rounds is determined by high and low remaining seeds.
So, I'm still taking Indy over Baltimore. However the divisional game (which is another dream game for me) pits the old guard for the Colts (Manning) against the new face of the organization (Luck). I actually like the Colts' chances against the Broncos.
Manning has always had problems with Pagano's defenses (and 3-4 defenses, in general). Billed as the Battle of the Stallions, I think the game comes right down to the wire, with the Colts pulling it out.
We all know Cincy lost to the Texans (as I thought they would). So, the Texans have advanced to the divisional round where they will be promptly crushed by the Pats.
I think we end up with a rarity in the AFCC: A rookie QB and coach.
Indianapolis vs. New England
LOL @ "Battle of the Stallions." Yep, it could be Indy filling in that spot, but I don't trust the Ratbirds. This is suppose to be Ray Lewis' last chance to go on to a SB. This will be an emotional game, possibly the best match up this weekend. IMO I'd rather have Indy, because the Pats trounced them 59-24 earlier this season.

There's a good printable bracket called the Draft Calculator (for office pools) that explains how this Wild Card Weekend gets sorted out.

Chip Kelly is visiting Philly, and I think Arizona was also mentioned. Everyone seems to think he's gathering "leverage" to use. This leaves me scratching my head after all the media releases this week.

Since: Apr 08

Akron, Ohio

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#10151
Jan 6, 2013
 

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*not saying Lewis hasn't won the SB before

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