Mexican forces converge on Oaxaca city

Federal riot police and soldiers toting shields and automatic weapons massed around this beleaguered colonial city Saturday in a bid to end a five-month standoff between striking teachers and supporters of ... Full Story
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YCNAN

Puebla, Mexico

#1 Oct 30, 2006
JUST A QUESTION. DO YOU THINK THIS IS THE WAY PRESIDENTS SHOULD SOLVE POLITICAL PROBLEMS WHEN THEY TALK ABOUT DEMOCRACY?
Patrick

Etla, Mexico

#2 Oct 30, 2006
Just a question. Do you think burning buses, forcing poor people out of work, forcing poor children out of school, beating people, killing people, and blockading roads is the proper way to pursue your political agenda while you talk about democracy?

Having the word popular in your name doesn't make you popular. The people of Oaxaca want and have a right to have their life back.
YCNAN

Mexico, Mexico

#3 Oct 31, 2006
I AM A MEXICAN STUDENT; I AM FROM OAXACA. I FEEL REALLY BAD ABOUT WHAT IS HAPPENING TO MY PEOPLE OVER HERE. FROM MY POINT OF VIEW WE REACHED A POINT WHERE POLITIC INTERESTS ARE THE CONCERN OF GOVERNORS BUT HUMAN RIGHTS. TAKING INTO ACCOUNT THAT NEXT DECEMBER 1ST 2006 MR. CALDERON WOULD BE DECLARED PRESIDENT OF MEXICO, AS ONE OF THE LEADERS OF THE APPO (FLAVIO SOSA) SAID,THE MAIN REASON WHY MEXICAN GOVERNMENT DOES NOT WANT ULISES RUIZ TO LEAVE THE GORVERNMENT IN OAXACA STATE IS THAT THE MEMBERS OF PARLIAMENT OF THE INSTITUTIONAL REVOLUTIONARY PARTY (PRI)OF OAXACA WILL NOT BE PRESENT AND RECOGNIZE THE DECLARATION OF MR. CALDERON AS THE PRESIDENT OF MEXICO IF ULISES RUIZ IS NOT SUPPORTED AS THE GOVERNOR OF OAXACA. THEN, THE POLITICAL INTERESTS WITH BIAS BEHIND THIS "ATTEMPT TO RECOVER PEACE IN OAXACA" IS OF COMMON SENSE.
oaxnan@hotmail.com
Eduardo

Austin, TX

#4 Oct 31, 2006
Como? que? de que hablas amigo? you're post made no sense. The guy is a crook and hires porros to scare everyone around, then that is no democracy and he should go. Period. Sometimes unfortunately the only way to get your point across is to protest and force others to take action. But what this has to do with Calderon, I don't know. Maybe you can explain it better since you are actually down in Oaxaca.
Patrick

Etla, Mexico

#5 Oct 31, 2006
"The guy is a crook and hires porros to scare everyone around, then that is no democracy and he should go. Period."

I'm sorry. Who are you talking about? The govenor, Ulises, or the head of the teachers' union, Rueda, or the spokesman for APPO, Sosa? They all fit the bill.

If you ask the average person here which of those persons is honest they laugh. If you ask whether or not Ulises is worse than his predecessor, Murat, or worse than his successor they laugh again.

It is no great surprise in Mexico or in the U.S. to learn that a politician or a union official is a crook.
LEE

AOL

#6 Nov 2, 2006
It is almost trdition that teachers pitch peaceful cmp each year in what was once a baautiful, colonial zocolo, with cafes, restaurants and a celebratory air. This year Ruiz sent police to brekup the camp. He had also sent buldozers and corporate enchmen to tear up and change one of the worlds most beautiful zocolos and LLano park for no reason other than cronyism. Single handedly he changed a wonderful center city into a semi modern ugliness. When police attached the teacers others joine. Sue, there are all kinds of groups in;cluding leftists and those wit there own interests but tgo ban demonstrations, change the face of a city with no rovocation. ruiz must step down. The good people of Oaxaca who are losing money because of business closing and who are tired of this strike must relize that the outsting of Ruiz is in their interet too. Every rebellion reuires sacrifice to reach its goa. Viva Oaxaca!!!
Patrick

Oaxaca, Mexico

#7 Nov 2, 2006
The teachers' strike is a tradition and one that is generally hated. They trash the zocalo, block the streets and highways, destroy property, and are generally very bad examples for their students.

I assume you haven't seen the zocalo lately. It does not represent "semi-modern ugliness". There are more places to sit and even places to recline during the heat of the afternoon if you want a nap. Llano Park is still under construction but the part that's done looks nice. Is it worth the money? I don't know if most public works projects are worth the money.
ycnan

Puebla, Mexico

#8 Nov 6, 2006
hey lee. i totally agree w/ u. it's a shame but sometimes there no other way. by the way as u can see there are some people's opinions like kind of out of thought we shouldnt take into account. anyways have a nice day.
Hombre

Indianapolis, IN

#9 Nov 9, 2006
Patrick wrote:
The teachers' strike is a tradition and one that is generally hated. They trash the zocalo, block the streets and highways, destroy property, and are generally very bad examples for their students.
Gee...I was assuming that they were really quite wonderful and peaceful by the propaganda they have been stirring up everywhere?!!?

he-he-he.
Hombre

Indianapolis, IN

#10 Nov 9, 2006
Patrick wrote:
I assume you haven't seen the zocalo lately. It does not represent "semi-modern ugliness". There are more places to sit and even places to recline during the heat of the afternoon if you want a nap. Llano Park is still under construction but the part that's done looks nice. Is it worth the money? I don't know if most public works projects are worth the money.
Hey...I was wondering...doe it have the humongous yellow plastic "M' McDonalds signage as a sort of combo kiddie gym/sculpture or will it be used as a neon fountain sort of focal point like the beloved Mayor wanted?
Hombre

Indianapolis, IN

#11 Nov 9, 2006
Well...whatever the McDonalds sculpture ends up functioning as, I am sure that the wisdom of the city fathers will make sure it compliments the Burger King on nearby Alcala.

Ha-ha-ha.

Hey, I can't wait for Oaxaca Disneyland, with the thrilling Zapotec rollercoaster careening down Monte Alban into lovely Arrozola, where riders will stretch for the injection-molded, plastic alebrije, enabling a FREE ride.
Patrick

Oaxaca, Mexico

#12 Nov 9, 2006
No, but I'm sure the Oaxaqueños would value your input on how they should live.
Hombre

Indianapolis, IN

#13 Nov 9, 2006
Sorry Patrick, but I'm just a little tired of all the anit-capitalist jargon and crapola, when the bottom line is that they want mo' money. When are they going to see through all of the garbage the left and Marcos is feeding them and realize that the way to prosperity is through capitalism? Think of it this way: if the teachers had more money, none of this would have ever happened. Their simply strangling themselves, and right now, it has become totally absurd. The only worthy element left is humor, because they are really making donkeys out of themselves, and I for one, have lost respect for their claim to intelligence and culture.
Patrick

Oaxaca, Mexico

#14 Nov 9, 2006
And I apologize for missing the humor. After six months the situation is getting tiring. The poor people here are really suffering.
Goyo

United States

#15 Nov 10, 2006
Really, the teachers are being duped since ages ago by their leftist - socialist entrenchment. Claiming to be sages they fall for placing their own chains around themselves through the carrot and stick method of the socialists. This is just the stick part now as they are not allowed even to think for themselves, but bullied to oppose any dialogue. The majority are becoming aware that there IS NO MONEY for their undeserved raise. Once again they expect remuneration for being on the "right" side of a political game instead of for producing a better products or a quality in education in a truely professional way. Socialism was and is always run by mafiosos which is economic terrorism at the least as was happening BEFORE the Gov. tried to break up the APPOcaliptic Zocolo circus. What kind of tradition is it when you expect a raise every year w/o producion but just digging a deeper hole and pulling in with you the very students who really need mature adults to teach them values?

This has been coming for a long time since there has been for several years little police presence and this was a wrong decision by the powers in charge as to not harass the tourist traffic. It was nice while it lasted in a marginal way since , yes, the police are mostly corrupt. This only emphasizes the basic mafia system ingrained in a population nacent from caciquismo and other abuses and now for several yrs. huevones maestros braying for their handout and throwing a temper tantrum when the new Gov. disagrees with their antics. the Gov. even if not totally on the up and up, was THEIR (the people at large) choice, as concluded the investigation into voter fraud. Now He finally decides to put some muscle into the laws for public order and common peace and comerce but He did not have a large enough police force of honest professional elements on hand to do the job. This was the result of fiscal neglegence and poor training of the law enforcement sector. This MUST be delt with first before and progress will be made in the region. Does Oax. and Mx. have the will to do the job right like Guilliani did in NYC? An honest well trained and courtious police force and efficient processing and investigation will be needed to back up the public demonstration of support for their democratic process. Things mus start with the arrest and investigation of the majesterio and APPO leaders for flagrant vandalistic and mafia tactics and crimes against the private property of the Oaxacan people.
Hombre

Indianapolis, IN

#16 Nov 10, 2006
A nice synopsis of the situation Goyo, at least to me.

I believe that the communists, who are basically akin to the secular humanists, have as part of their manifesto, if not written expressly, then certainly implied, that children are the key to the future, and if one brainwashes them, then the entire culture will change. You are right.
Leftist activist teachers create leftist acxtist children, just as surely as Islamic radicals are producing little suicide bombers. How does one stop this?
How does one educate adults who have been indoctrinated since youth?
Force, unfortunately produces rebellion, although at this point, that may be all that can be done. The best key, IMO, is to realize that teaching positions have become tools for societal change, instead of educating people to freely think for themselves. The classroom is now a war zone for control of the future. That being said, perhaps it is time for the 'real ' people of Oaxaca to get involved with the educational system, and begin to think about 'ousting' THOSE leaders, as well as your suggestion about arresting and charging ALL those who have engaged in vandalism and the kidnapping of an entire city.
...you know...the roads are really not that great in Mexico...they could use a new Interstate system like ours. APPO would make a great slave labor resource to accomplish something positive 'for the people'.
AsianBoi

Burnaby, Canada

#17 Nov 10, 2006
I live in Vancouver, and recently I visited the city of Oaxaca, and believe me, it is a beautiful place. I am sadden by what has happen in the past 5 months, an hopefully they can resolve this matter quickly. I dont know the whole story, but government and policing has always been corrupted. I wish the best of luck to the Oaxacan people, getting their life and freedom back. I hope my homestay parents are okie!!
Carlos

United States

#18 Nov 28, 2006
Some friends of mine are selling their property in Oaxaco for 10 cents on the dollar...they just want out. A beautiful city has been ruined and no problems have been solved. What a real shame for the people of Oaxaca--they have to live and work(or at least once, they worked) in this city of despair. Tourism is ruined for a long, long time and all the shop owners, all the hotels, all the restaurants...what is to happen to all the dreams of those hard working people? Many will lose everything.
Disgusting!
Patrick

Fortín De Las Flores, Mexico

#19 Nov 29, 2006
Mexicans in the State of Oaxaca take pride in their ability to survive. Oaxaca has been a mess for six months but it has not been destroyed. The city is the people, not the politicians. The people are amazingly optomistic. The kids are back in school, we have police on the streets again, and the last barricade was removed this morning.

I don't know what the future holds but Oaxaca will survive.
Heather

Port Alberni, Canada

#20 Nov 30, 2006
This started long before the teacher's strike. The strike was just the blow that started the recent events off.

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