Police forced back as Mexico violence...

Police forced back as Mexico violence flares

There are 11 comments on the Reuters story from Nov 2, 2006, titled Police forced back as Mexico violence flares. In it, Reuters reports that:

By Noel RandewichOAXACA, Mexico - Thousands of protesters hurling Molotov cocktails forced riot police using tear gas and water cannons to retreat on Thursday as clashes spiraled out of control in Mexico's ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Reuters.

lesing1

Peachtree City, GA

#1 Nov 3, 2006
Will this happen in the USA if a candidate is elected that they don't like? I do not feel safe in this country anymore because there are so many mexicans in this country and they are not like the other immigrants who are loyal to this country. A little food for thought: With so many mexicans in this country, what would happen if the USA had a conflict or went to war with Mexico? Remember these people love and are loyal to Mexico, do not care for Americans, except for the money. Think about it, because it is a nightmare that I have on a regular basis. Scenes that we are seeing on the news from Mexico could be right here on our turf, if they do not like a candidate or policy here.
bongon247

United States

#2 Nov 3, 2006
This should happen in the USA. What do you do when your government steps on your rights? And you're worried about Mexicans who might like what our government chooses for us? What about the Americans who don't like it and are much more willing to fight to preserve/take back the freedoms that have been taken away from us? Americans such as myself. You should have these nightmares, because it is going to happen, I just hope in my lifetime so that I might take part in a second American revolution.

The only way evil will prevail is when good men do nothing. These people in Mexico, including a relative of mine, are fighting for true Democracy in Mexico, to overthrow the painted over corruption that passes for such and form a government that cares for all of its people, regardless of whether they are indian, mexican, elite, or not...

They are far more brave than the likes of those in the USA who huddle in their livingrooms, watching this on t.v. and shaking their heads.

Look around you, your government is doing these same things to you and you welcome it. You take for granted freedom granted to you not by your government but held in trust by its people, when those people hand that trust back to the government that freedom is an illusion. There are those who will fight to take it back, be aware as we are dangerous to you.
Hombre

United States

#3 Nov 3, 2006
...what about the rights of the vast majority of
the city of Oaxaca?...do they not have a right to
some normality in their lives?...we are simply looking at a minority who continues to violently
force their opinions on the majority, who wish this would all end. If the teachers don't like their pay scale, and they aren't being heard, perhaps
it is time for them to pick another vocation.
K Vronna

Mexico, Mexico

#4 Nov 3, 2006
What's truly behind the mess in Oaxaca will turn the stomach of many who are now applauding the protestors, once the story becomes known. Mexican leftists are out of touch with the real faces behind the social unrest now affecting our country. López Obrador should be a lesson for all who think that Mexico is undergoing a social revolution to better the conditions of the poor. Opportunism is what is happening; money/power is what drives this resurgence of a spurrious left.
Hombre

United States

#5 Nov 6, 2006
[QUOTE who="K Vronna" Mexican leftists are out of touch with the real faces behind the social unrest now affecting our country.[/QUOTE]

It's the same in the US.
I think that one of the greatest problems of the left is their
lack of long term memory. They simply fail to remember
what it was that happened whenever the left was in power,
and find it easier to fall into the 'blame game' presented to
them by the Left, than to begin to create anew and build
a better way...that is hard work...not handouts.

[QUOTE who="K Vronna"
Opportunism is what is happening; money/power is what drives this resurgence of a spurious left.[/QUOTE]

...I might add...through the vehicle of lies, distortions, and typical
leftist semantics.

...why is it that we are constantly being told that the protestors are peaceful,
and noble, when they have held a city of 275,000 captive for 5 months,
manipulated an entire states' economy to the loss of hundreds of millions
of dolllars ( that would be BILLIONS OF PESOS ), hijacking and burning private vehicles at will randomly, and hurtling GASOLINE BOMBS, and fireworks stuffed with glass and nails at Federal Troops who have come to bring peace to the city armed with water cannons and tear gas?

This is TERRORIST/REVOLUTIONARY methodology, NOT peaceful dissent.
Hombre

United States

#6 Nov 6, 2006
K Vronna wrote:
Mexican leftists are out of touch with the real faces behind the social unrest now affecting our country.
It's the same in the US.
I think that one of the greatest problems of the left is their
lack of long term memory. They simply fail to remember
what it was that happened whenever the left was in power,
and find it easier to fall into the 'blame game' presented to
them by the Left, than to begin to create anew and build
a better way...that is hard work...not handouts.
K Vronna wrote:
Opportunism is what is happening; money/power is what drives this resurgence of a spurious left.
...I might add...through the vehicle of lies, distortions, and typical
leftist semantics.

...why is it that we are constantly being told that the protestors are peaceful,
and noble, when they have held a city of 275,000 captive for 5 months,
manipulated an entire states' economy to the loss of hundreds of millions
of dolllars ( that would be BILLIONS OF PESOS ), hijacking and burning private vehicles at will randomly, and hurtling GASOLINE BOMBS, and fireworks stuffed with glass and nails at Federal Troops who have come to bring peace to the city armed with water cannons and tear gas?

This is TERRORIST/REVOLUTIONARY methodology, NOT peaceful dissent.

López Obrador should be a lesson for all who think that Mexico is undergoing a social revolution to better the conditions of the poor. Opportunism is what is happening; money/power is what drives this resurgence of a spurrious left.
Nemo

Florence, AL

#7 Nov 6, 2006
not everybody sits around and does nothing when oppression, corruption and the loss of democracy is at hand, and when it's too late the big awe comes around...
Hombre

United States

#8 Nov 7, 2006
A recent quote from the San Francisco Chronicle:

In the meantime, many residents in Oaxaca say they are wary of the conflict.

"I agree with what the protesters say, that the government stinks and does nothing for the poor," said Gabriel Cruz, 47, a taxi driver, who says his wages have been cut by half since the protests began. "But enough is enough. This situation is now to the point where we're all losing."

The article:
http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi...
Jesus

Laredo, TX

#9 Nov 10, 2006
This is the way I think that we need in Mexico a different type of goverment,we need a goverment that instead of promoting jobs in the cities,promote jobs in the fields and help our people with resourses and machinery to cultivate our fruits and vegetables, this way our people will not crooss the Rio Grande nor the dessert of Arizona risking their lives and leaving their children without a dad or a mom.I am a passionatte for Mexico even is not the country I was born but it is my parents land and of course from the U.S I will fight for Mexico because it is a Great country.
Patrick

Mexico

#10 Nov 11, 2006
Jesus, I admire your concern and I've thought a lot about the same problems. I live in Oaxaca and most of our villages here are in the mountains and are quite remote. Their crops are raised in tiny plots if land set in steep hills. Mechanization isn't practical and in many cases not possible. Many of the villages here, and in other parts of Mexico, don't have the water needed for large-scale production.

I've considered the possibilit of starting some sort of industry in the villages and learned that it was tried some years ago. The difficulty of transporting the products to market doomed the industries. To be honest, corruption at both the local and state level didn't help any either but I suspect they would have failed regardless.

It's sad but I think the villages in Oaxaca face the same future as villages in Texas. The young will leave to work in the cities and the villages will have only the old holding on till they die.

That said, I think it's best if there are jobs in the cities of Mexico so people can still visit their "home".

I also have a great deal of respect for your parents. They sacrificed much, at least in party, for you.
Hombre

United States

#11 Nov 13, 2006
Patrick wrote:
I've considered the possibilit of starting some sort of industry in the villages and learned that it was tried some years ago. The difficulty of transporting the products to market doomed the industries. To be honest, corruption at both the local and state level didn't help any either but I suspect they would have failed regardless.
Uh...YEAH.
UPS pulled out years ago, because their trucks kept getting hijacked.
That leaves the overpriced DHL, or Estafeta. Neither of which is good for
anything more than a box or 2 at $150 a crack. Containers are a possibility,
but the reality is, it will take HUGE corporate investment as well as a government committed to commerce to make things work, until then, the only products that will come out of Mexico in volume are auto parts and the like from factories within the magic 25 mile border with the US. I have tales to tell about importing from Mexico to the US, and IT AIN"T EASY...and that is why people eventually give up trying.

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