Decades later, the fight for stability still rages in Oaxaca

There are 9 comments on the Nov 24, 2006, Houston Chronicle story titled Decades later, the fight for stability still rages in Oaxaca. In it, Houston Chronicle reports that:

Southern Mexico's underdogs are rebelling once more and Juan Sosa is right in the thick of it, again.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Houston Chronicle.

Martin Stein

New York, NY

#1 Nov 26, 2006
At least some attempt by the mainstream press to present the situation in Oaxaca with some depth, balance and perspective, behind the reporting of the day's events like the scores of baseball games.
Hombre

Indianapolis, IN

#2 Nov 26, 2006
Martin Stein wrote:
......behind the reporting of the day's events like the scores of baseball games.
Yeah...sad isn't it?

..apparently, the lesson of 9/11 hasn't really sunk in yet....i.e. that there is an entire world outside of Americas' borders that is set on BOIL; yet seemingly the greatest concern right now, is whether or not one will be one of the lucky ones to get a Playstation 3 at Best Buy.
live legally n Mexico 2

Monterrey, Mexico

#3 Nov 26, 2006
Balanced my ass. The Sosa family leads a bunch of thugs. There are serious problems here but what is going on is not political in nature, it is criminal
Patrick

Oaxaca, Mexico

#4 Nov 26, 2006
I don't think the article was as bad as most but I'm afraid I see the problems as being groups fighting over which pigs will be at the trough and the poor people are caught in the middle.

More importantly, Oaxaca has to decide whether political power will be determined by violence or democracy.
Hombre

Indianapolis, IN

#5 Nov 27, 2006
live legally n Mexico 2 wrote:
Balanced my ass. The Sosa family leads a bunch of thugs. There are serious problems here but what is going on is not political in nature, it is criminal
Amen to that one.
...but take it easy on Marty, the reporting that one can see up here in the states is MINISCULE, and the problems in Mexico are complicated ones. Fact is, the US in general is just flat ignorant about what is going on down there...most have never even heard of Oaxaca, let alone understand it.
I saw just last night....6 MONTHS into the Oaxaca debacle, the very FIRST coverage on television...the Fox news channel showed a 5 second clip of the APPO-ites throwing molotov cocktails, and firing 5 dollar firework rockets via PVC tubing as launchers, amidst the sporadic sounds of gunshots. Yeah...it's criminal, and as Patrick says, it remains to be seen whether change will come through democratic and peaceful means, or whether it will be violent....at any rate, the APPO-ites are destroying tourism, and the hopes of the common man. Perhaps it is time for the Oaxacans to get behind the Federal police and the vigilantes...I mean.....HOW MUCH and HOW LONG are the people of Oaxaca going to allow thugs to ruin their lives? This is really no different than Lebanon or any other area where the general populace are hurt by a group of terrorists who bully them around...at least though, there are a few who are actively resisting APPO. I saw a bumper sticker the other up here the other day. It read 'Land of the free, BECAUSE OF the brave'. APPO is nothing more than organized crime at this point, fighting against duly elected public officials. They can no longer masquerade behind the teachers strike. They are guilty of rebellion against Mexicos' sovereignty, of civil disobedience, inciting riot, inummerable counts of property damage, and perhaps murder and conspiracy to Bradley Wills' murder, for the sake and expediency of media coverage....not to mention the massive loss of income to the entire state through the cessation of tourism, that is draining the lifeblood of HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS of people. They have demonstrated their will to continue to hold the city hostage. It is time for the city to either speak back, or join them. Apathy and negligence do not win freedom.
Martin Stein

New York, NY

#6 Nov 27, 2006
live legally n Mexico 2 wrote:
Balanced my ass. The Sosa family leads a bunch of thugs. There are serious problems here but what is going on is not political in nature, it is criminal
The two Sosa's in the news are not related, as a recent newspaper article noted. This mess in Oaxaca might have been avoided if Ruiz and the PRI had not acted like fascist thugs sending riot police to break up a peaceful striking teachers demonstration in May. Ruiz opened up a Pandora's box by doing this, and he should resign.
Martin Stein

New York, NY

#7 Nov 27, 2006
Patrick wrote:
I don't think the article was as bad as most but I'm afraid I see the problems as being groups fighting over which pigs will be at the trough and the poor people are caught in the middle.
More importantly, Oaxaca has to decide whether political power will be determined by violence or democracy.
That may be true, but in a democracy, the right of assembly is guaranteed, and riot police are not sent in to disperse a peaceful demonstration of striking teachers. Ruiz used old PRI tactics and his strategy blew up in his face. He should resign for the greater good before the situation gets even worse. That is the only way to defuse the current situation.
Hombre

Indianapolis, IN

#8 Nov 27, 2006
Martin Stein wrote:
<quoted text>
That may be true, but in a democracy, the right of assembly is guaranteed, and riot police are not sent in to disperse a peaceful demonstration of striking teachers. Ruiz used old PRI tactics and his strategy blew up in his face. He should resign for the greater good before the situation gets even worse. That is the only way to defuse the current situation.
I said the same things also, and though I believe that the situation is far more complex now, and what WAS a 'peaceful' group of demonstrators,
has now caused far more damage than Ruiz' intial reaction, Ruiz SHOULD resign for the greater good at this point, and leave the demonstrators with an option to either disband and go home peacefully, or continue in their pointless regression into meaningless violence driven by class envy. At that point, the Federal government would have far more flexibility in dealing with it, through a monitored democratic election process, or force, if necessary.
Martin Stein

New York, NY

#9 Nov 28, 2006
Hombre wrote:
<quoted text>
I said the same things also, and though I believe that the situation is far more complex now, and what WAS a 'peaceful' group of demonstrators,
has now caused far more damage than Ruiz' intial reaction, Ruiz SHOULD resign for the greater good at this point, and leave the demonstrators with an option to either disband and go home peacefully, or continue in their pointless regression into meaningless violence driven by class envy. At that point, the Federal government would have far more flexibility in dealing with it, through a monitored democratic election process, or force, if necessary.
I'm not sure that class envy is a proper description of all protesters. Bush and his neocons in America lable critics as unpatriotic, cowardly or immoral.If Ruiz were to resign, I agree that everyone would then be able to decifer who really wants to work towards a solution and those who seek violence for violence sake. Many anti-globalization protesters
give the movement a bad name through useless vandalism. Ruiz lit the fuse that ignited this crisis and his mismanagement of this entire crisis proved his ineptness. His used old PRI intimidation methods, like the massacre of 1968, and it blew up in his face. The loss of millions of dollars to the Oaxacan economy is tragic, and his resignation might at least allow tourists to return. It is the inaction of Fox as well as the governor's stubborness that has allowed this to spin out of control. Even if the situation were to calm down, the same inequities in Mexico and specifically in Oaxaca will remain.If these issues weren't real, Obrador would not have come so close to winning the election. Violence is not a solution, but obviously the continuing violence in Oaxaca may serve the goals and needs of certain segments of the protesters as well as those in the national government. This all make Obrador's movement look bad, and forces an alliance between the PRI and PAN, against the PRD. The ordinary people in the middle of all of this suffer. There may no longer be good will on either side.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Nayarit, Mexico Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Luna County Sheriff's Office welcomes new hires (Jan '14) Aug '14 same old story 15
News Dolphins: Another world in Puerto Vallarta/Rivi... (Nov '13) Nov '13 Sirius 2
News Mexico Hopes to Expand Tourism Market to Russia... (Sep '13) Sep '13 sirius 2
News 48 hours in Madrid (Feb '13) Feb '13 Sirius 4
News Global acts of kindness (Nov '09) Jan '13 Sirius 4
News Rally planned for San Jose man facing deportation (Nov '12) Dec '12 Concerned 85
News Alejandro Martinez Passes Away After Three Year... (Aug '12) Aug '12 Osaronmcdonal 1
More from around the web