Army Research Grant to Explore Commun...

Army Research Grant to Explore Communication Through Brain Waves

There are 8572 comments on the Department of Defense News story from Sep 14, 2008, titled Army Research Grant to Explore Communication Through Brain Waves. In it, Department of Defense News reports that:

The 1982 Clint Eastwood thriller "Firefox" seemed like the ultimate military science fiction story: A former Vietnam War pilot steals a state-of-the-art Soviet fighter plane armed with weapons controlled solely ...

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Department of Defense News.

John Doe

Baltimore, MD

#3463 Feb 24, 2013
The Food Stamp Act of 1964 (P.L. 88-525) provided permanent legislative authority to the Food Stamp Program, which had been administratively implemented on a pilot basis in 1962. It was later replaced and completely rewritten and revised by the food stamp provisions of the Food and Agriculture Act of 1977 (P.L. 95-113, Title XIII; 7 U.S.C. 2011
et seq.), which eliminated the purchase requirement and simplified eligibility requirements. Amendments were made to this Act in 1981-82, 1984-85, 1988, 1990, 1994, 1996, 1997, 1998 and 2002 (most recently by Title IV of the 2002 farm bill (P.L. 107-171, Sec. 4101-4126).
As of 2005, the current Food Stamp Act (7 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.) includes authority through FY2007 for the regular Food Stamp Program, for Nutrition Assistance Grants to Puerto Rico and American Samoa (in lieu of food stamps), for Food Distribution on Indian Reservations, and for commodity purchases for the Emergency Food Assistance Program.
John Doe

Baltimore, MD

#3464 Feb 24, 2013
Medicaid is the United States health program for certain people and families with low incomes and resources. It is a means-tested program that is jointly funded by the state and federal governments, and is managed by the states.[1] People served by Medicaid are U.S. citizens or legal permanent residents, including low-income adults, their children, and people with certain disabilities. Poverty alone does not necessarily qualify someone for Medicaid. Medicaid is the largest source of funding for medical and health-related services for people with limited income in the United States.
John Doe

Baltimore, MD

#3465 Feb 24, 2013
A food stamp challenge is a trend in the United States popularized by religious groups, community activists and food pantries in which a family of means chooses to purchase food using only the monetary equivalent of what a family that size would receive in federal food stamps.[1] In 2007, this amounted to US$3 per person per day.[2]
CNN reporter Sean Callebs did an experiment where he spent the month of February 2009 eating only as much food as what a person could get with the maximum possible amount of food stamps. Since he was living in New Orleans, Louisiana, this amounted to $176. At the end of the experiment, he said that he had eaten pretty well, and that the biggest drawback was a social one, not a nutritional one, because he could not go out to eat at restaurants with friends.[3]
In St. Louis, Missouri, Food Outreach executive director Greg Lukeman has led a food stamp challenge since 2008, during September "Hunger Action Month" to bring awareness of the nonprofit organization's clients. Community members, Food Outreach staff and supporters, area politicians, and members of the local media have participated and blog about the experience.[4]
In October 2010, a new documentary Food Stamped, where a couple live on a food stamp budget for a week, premiered at the Mill Valley Film Festival.
John Doe

Baltimore, MD

#3466 Feb 24, 2013
A soup kitchen, bread line, meal center or food kitchen is a place where food is offered to the hungry for free or at a below market, affordable price. Frequently located in lower-income neighborhoods, they are often staffed by volunteer organizations, such as church groups or community groups. Soup kitchens sometimes obtain food from a food bank for free or at a low price, because they are considered a charity, which makes it easier for them to feed the many people who require their services. Many historical and some modern soup kitchens serve only soup with perhaps some bread. But several establishments which title themselves as a "soup kitchen" also serve other types of food, so they are often grouped together with similar hunger relief agencies that provide more varied hot meals, like food kitchens and meal centres.
While societies have been using various methods to share food with the hungry for millennia, the first soup kitchens in the modern sense may have emerged in the late 18th century. By the late 19th century they were to be found in several US and European cities. In the United States and elsewhere, they became more prominent in the 20th century during the Great depression. With the improved economic conditions that followed World War II, soup kitchens became less widely used, at least in the advanced economies. In the United States, there was a resurgence in the use of soup kitchens following the cut backs in welfare that were implemented in the early 1980s.
John Doe

Baltimore, MD

#3467 Feb 24, 2013
A food stamp challenge is a trend in the United States popularized by religious groups, community activists and food pantries in which a family of means chooses to purchase food using only the monetary equivalent of what a family that size would receive in federal food stamps.[1] In 2007, this amounted to US$3 per person per day.[2]

………………………… where he spent the month of ........2009 eating only as much food as what a person could get with the maximum possible amount of food stamps. Since he was living in…………….,……… this amounted to $176. At the end of the experiment,……………………. and that the ……………..was a social one, not a nutritional one, because he could …………………………with friends.[3]

In……………….., Food Outreach …………………has led a food stamp challenge since 2008, during .........."Hunger Action Month" to bring awareness of the ………………….clients. Community members, Food Outreach staff and supporters ……………, and …………..…………have participated ……………..about the experience.[4]

In .........2010, a new documentary Food Stamped, where a couple live on a food stamp budget for.......... at the………………..
John Doe

Baltimore, MD

#3468 Feb 24, 2013
Tuskegee University is a private, historically black university located in Tuskegee, Alabama, United States; founded by African-American educator Booker T. Washington. The campus has been designated as the Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site, a National Historic Landmark. Out of more than 85,000 places on the National Register of Historic Places only about 2,430 are NHL's. Tuskegee University's campus is the only historically black college or university to hold this distinction.
John Doe

Baltimore, MD

#3469 Feb 24, 2013
Bessemer is a city outside of Birmingham in Jefferson County, Alabama, United States eight miles (13 km) west of Hoover. The population was 27,456 at the 2010 Census.[1]
Bessemer is situated in the midst of the iron ore and limestone district of Alabama, in the southern part of Jones Valley (about 3 miles (4.8 km) wide). Iron ore was mined on the hills on the city's southeast side, coal was (and still is) mined to the north and west, and limestone deposits were also nearby. All three ingredients were necessary for steelmaking, which led to the area becoming a major steel center from about 1890 through the twentieth century. Steel is no longer made within the city limits, but is still manufactured in the neighboring city of Fairfield.
John Doe

Baltimore, MD

#3470 Feb 24, 2013
Abram Hoffer (November 11, 1917 – May 27, 2009) was a Canadian biochemist, physician and psychiatrist who developed a theory that nutrition and vitamins may be effective treatments for schizophrenia. This general approach is not considered credible within the medical community.[1][2][3] It includes the use of large doses of vitamins and is commonly called megavitamin therapy in general. Hoffer is also known for his "adrenochrome hypothesis" of schizoaffective disorders and protocols for remediation based on natural compounds such as vitamins, minerals and specific fats.[4] Hoffer was also involved in the discovery that high dose niacin can be used to treat high cholesterol and other dyslipidemias.[5]

Humphry Fortescue Osmond (1 July 1917 - 6 February 2004) was a British psychiatrist known for inventing the word psychedelic and for his research on psychedelic drugs. Osmond also explored aspects of the psychology of social environments, in particular how they influenced welfare or recovery in mental institutions.
John Doe

Baltimore, MD

#3471 Feb 24, 2013
B---r---u---n---o---s Supermarkets,.........is an American chain of grocery stores with its headquarters in .......... Alabama.[1]
It founded in 1932 by .......... in .......... During the company's pinnacle, it operated over 300 stores under the names B---r---u---n---o---s,........ . and American Fare in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Tennessee, and South Carolina.
John Doe

Baltimore, MD

#3472 Feb 24, 2013
Fort Bragg is a large United States Army installation, located in Cumberland, Hoke, Harnett and Moore counties, North Carolina, mostly in Fayetteville but also partly in the town of Spring Lake. It was also a census-designated place in the 2010 Census, during which a population of 39,457 was identified. The fort is named for Confederate general Braxton Bragg. It covers over 251 square miles (650 km2). It is the home of the US Army airborne forces and Special Forces, as well as U.S. Army Forces Command and U.S. Army Reserve Command
John Doe

Baltimore, MD

#3473 Feb 24, 2013
The Rhine Research Center Institute for Parapsychology, named after its founder J. B. Rhine, is a parapsychology research unit that "aims to improve the human condition by creating a scientific understanding of those abilities and sensitivities that appear to transcend the ordinary limits of space and time."[1] It is the successor to the .......... Laboratory at ……………..in Durham, North Carolina, and Rhine's later laboratory, the Foundation for Research on the Nature of Man (FRNM).[2]…………….severed its affiliation with the Parapsychology Laboratory during the 1960s after Rhine retired.[3] The Rhine Research Center continues to conduct .......... research today, but has expanded doing related mind/body health research and maintains a relationship with…………………….
John Doe

Baltimore, MD

#3474 Feb 24, 2013
Hoboken (/………………/ HO-bo-ken;[15] Lenape: Hupokan[16]) is a city in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 50,005,[7][8][9] having grown by 11,428 ……….from the 38,577 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 5,180 ……….from the 33,397 counted in the 1990 Census.[17] The city is part of the New York metropolitan area and contains………………..,…for the region.
Hoboken is also the location of the first recorded game of baseball and of the………………. one of the oldest technological universities in the United States.
Hoboken was first settled as part of the Pavonia, New Netherland colony in the 17th century. During the early 19th century the city was developed by……………….., first as a resort and later as a residential neighborhood. It became a township in 1849 and was incorporated as a city in 1855. Its waterfront ……………………….New York and New Jersey and home to major industries for most of the 20th century. The character of the city has changed from a blue collar town ……………..shops and condominiums. Hoboken is part of the New Jersey ……………Coast.[18]
John Doe

Baltimore, MD

#3475 Feb 24, 2013
Small Airport Automatic Weather Stations, USA
Radio and Telephone Weather Information, Small Commercial and Private Airports
Sacramento, California

Federal Aviation Administration, 100% Federal Government Funding, Support and Certification
Design, Engineering, Manufacture, Installation, Management, and Field Service Maintenance

An automatic weather station (AWS) is an automated version of the traditional weather station, either to save human labour or to enable measurements from remote areas.[1] An AWS will typically consist of a weather-proof enclosure containing the data logger, rechargeable battery, telemetry (optional) and the meteorological sensors with an attached solar panel or wind turbine and mounted upon a mast. The specific configuration may vary due to the purpose of the system.[1] The system may report in near real time via the Argos System and the Global Telecommunications System,[2] or save the data for later recovery.[3] In the past, automatic weather stations were often placed where electricity and communication lines were available. Nowadays, the solar panel, wind turbine and mobile phone technology have made it possible to have wireless stations that are not connected to the electrical grid or telecommunications network.[4]
John Doe

Baltimore, MD

#3476 Feb 24, 2013
Smithsonian's National Zoo
nationalzoo.si.edu/
The Smithsonian's National Zoo is a leader in animal care, science, education, and providing a phenomenal visitor experience online and in Washington, D.C..
Primate and Brain Exhibit

Visit - National Zoo
nationalzoo.si.edu/visit/
Visit the National Zoo in Washington D.C. Links to zoo hours, map, directions,... Part of the Smithsonian Institution, the National Zoo is the nation's zoo. It is a ...
Blogger TV Frez

Baltimore, MD

#3477 Mar 16, 2013
Slang is the use of informal words and expressions that are not considered standard in the speaker's language or dialect but are considered acceptable in certain social settings. Slang expressions may act as euphemisms and may be used as a means of identifying with one's peers.

Slang

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Blogger TV Frez

Baltimore, MD

#3478 Mar 16, 2013
Renewable energy is energy that comes from resources which are continually replenished such as sunlight, wind, rain, tides, waves and geothermal heat. About 16% of global final energy consumption comes from renewable resources, with 10% of all energy from traditional biomass, mainly used for heating, and 3.4% from hydroelectricity. New renewables (small hydro, modern biomass, wind, solar, geothermal, and biofuels) accounted for another 3% and are growing very rapidly.[2] The share of renewables in electricity generation is around 19%, with 16% of electricity coming from hydroelectricity and 3% from new renewables.

Renewable energy

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Blogger TV Frez

Baltimore, MD

#3479 Mar 16, 2013
Food and The World Hunger For Network Prime Time Evening American Television Shows

Hot and Spicy
Renewable Energy Resources
Biodegradable Plants, and Animals

Television:
"The Days of Our Lives"("Sands of Time")
"Them"
Blogger TV Frez

Baltimore, MD

#3480 Mar 16, 2013
“Biodegradation is the chemical dissolution of materials by bacteria or other biological means. Although often conflated, biodegradable is distinct in meaning from compostable.”

Biodegradation

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Blogger TV Frez

Baltimore, MD

#3481 Mar 16, 2013
“Life extension science, also known as anti-aging medicine, experimental gerontology, and biomedical gerontology, is the study of slowing down or reversing the processes of aging to extend both the maximum and average lifespan. Some researchers in this area, and "life extensionists" or "longevists" (those who wish to achieve longer lives themselves), believe that future breakthroughs in tissue rejuvenation with stem cells, molecular repair, and organ replacement (such as with artificial organs or xenotransplantations) will eventually enable humans to have indefinite lifespans (agerasia[1]) through complete rejuvenation to a healthy youthful condition.”

Life extension

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

“Vincent Willem van Gogh (Dutch:[…………………. listen);[note 1] 30 March 1853 – 29 July 1890) was a Dutch post-Impressionist painter whose work, notable for its rough beauty, emotional honesty and bold color, had a far-reaching influence on 20th-century art. After years of painful anxiety and frequent bouts of mental illness,[1][2] he died aged 37 from a gunshot wound, generally accepted to be self-inflicted (although no gun was ever found).[3][note 2] His work was then known to only a handful of people and appreciated by fewer still.”

Vincent van Gogh

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Blogger TV Frez

Baltimore, MD

#3482 Mar 16, 2013
The Hanging Gardens of Babylon were one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World, and the only one of the wonders that may have been purely legendary. They were purportedly built in the ancient city-state of Babylon, near present-day Al Hillah, Babil province, in Iraq. The Hanging Gardens were not the only World Wonder in Babylon; the city walls and obelisk attributed to Queen Semiramis were also featured in ancient lists of Wonders.[1]

Hanging Gardens of Babylon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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