Little Dorrit 2- Sample Entries

Little Dorrit 2- Sample Entries

Posted in the Little Dorrit Forum

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#1 Oct 28, 2008
I will be placing on occasion sample entries from my Little Dorrit 2 series, which I am now revising into novel form. Most of these, like the following, is written in Arthur Clennam's point of view.
The first entry:
One day, Amy brought the baby to me amd allowed me to hold her a while. I was afraid at first, but Amy showed me how to support the baby's head and body, and soon I felt comfortable. The baby turned her head when I spoke, and seemed to like me talking to her. The baby's hands were little fists, and would grasp and ungrasp on occasion. The baby moved her lips and seemed like she wanted to say something, but didn't quite know how. Her hair was growing, and was a brilliant red. Her blue eyes seemed to follow my every movement, and the child was very observing at her age. The child made a soft chirping noise, and Amy felt that meant she wanted her mother, so I gave the baby back to her. I had never studied a infant closely before, and it was hard enough to comprehend this was my own daughter. Amy said it was time to feed the baby, so Amy left the room.
This child apparently didn't cry very much, but expressed what it needed in one-syllable short vocalizations (as a quick short WA!).So it was very unusual when our child did cry.

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#2 Oct 28, 2008
Introduction To Horses
Amy went to the house being used as a stable, and looked inside. It did not take long to recognize the horses. It was a pair the Dorrit family had owned during the short time of fortune. A note sent along with the horses said they had been sent by her brother Tip, being the one who directed the disposal of the Dorrit estate, and were sent because Amy was the only one in the family who had expressed interest in these animals. These horses were such excepted from sale for these reasons: Bones (a chestnut gelding) because of his sparse appearance) and Bluebird (a blue dun mare) named as having a shying habit, though Amy was certain she did nothing more than kick a servant.(Actually, Bluebird kicked Mrs. General, but Mrs. General should know better than force a sensitive mare's head up with the despised bearing-rein.)
When Arthur saw the horses, he was delighted in them, and how gentle they were. The horses stood outside (being the stable was being rebuilt) and Arthur could only be impressed how they stood quietly and allowed Arthur to inspect them. He said the horses should do well, and was especially attached to Bluebird. It was not long afterward (when Arthur had a short consultation with Amy) he had selected Bluebird as his personal mount, though he had to learn to ride first.

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#3 Oct 29, 2008
Arthur's views, upon learning Mrs. Clennam is dying:
"As I lay in my bed that evening, and having the news fresh from Amy that my mother may be upon her deathbed, I wondered what to do. I turned upon my side and thought how much had been waste in my life- and how much most, if not all of it, seemed to direct to Mother. I soon realized that it might be a great mistake to consider even going to Mother now, as she would not be accepting of me in this condition, as she had never seemed to be accepting of me (in any condition). The best thing for me to do at this time was to stay where I was and let Mother pass quietly, and not even give her a chance to think about my presence. I made figures with a finger upon the bed sheets, and I realized that maybe what I was doing now was the best, as I may not even know the full extent of what would happen or was possible if Mother was allowed to see me now. I soon lay down, and tried to push away such distracting thoughts as I settled myself into bed."

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#4 Oct 30, 2008
The Birth of A Second Child (script form)
(Amy's second pregnancy has been rather difficult, and Arthur has wondered why she had been so heavy. The new governess, Melinda speculates that Amy might be expecting twins. It is August 1859. Amy soon goes into labor, and Melinda is sent for a midwife. The midwife has concerns when she sees Amy.)
Midwife: I am concerned we might have to take her to the hospital, but I'll do the best I can.
(Arthur sends Melinda for a doctor as the midwife attends Amy. When the doctor arrives, Arthur is on his way out, as Bluebird is saddled and brought out to him. The doctor gives Amy a anesthetic as he watches Arthur mount and ride away from the window.)
Doctor: That might be the best thing for him to do at the moment.
Midwife: I think so. I think there's a dead baby.
(The doctor turns, surprised. But he and the midwife get to work, as Amy is asleep. They take turns manually working with the contractions, and work out a partially-developed stillborn infant. Later, a living infant is pulled out.)
Melinda: So there were twins.
Midwife: As small as she is, there was scarcely room for both of them.

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#5 Oct 30, 2008
Birth of A Second Child-Part 2
(The living child is a dark-haired girl, and washed by the midwife and wrapped in warm cloths. The stillborn infant is determined to have been a boy, and wrapped in linen and prepared for burial. Once Amy awakes, the situation is explained to her. Arthur soon returns, and is told what had happened. Arthur goes to a nearby room to weep as Amy nurses her new daughter.)
Amy: She will be Fanny, like my sister. My sister had a miscarriage, so she might appreciate the move.
(Arthur returns to see Amy and the newborn as the wrapped remains of the dead child are taken away for burial. Arthur and Amy decide to name the stillborn William Clennam, so it can be buried with a identity. They also finalize the name of their daughter: Frances Mary Clennam. Once Amy has recovered from childbirth, they can go to St. George's Church in Southwark so Baby Fanny can be christened and stillborn William can be buried. The burial first, of course, so once it is done, the family can focus on the living child.)
Elisha Sampson (Melinda's uncle): My deepest sympathies on the loss of your son.
Arthur: Maybe God will be willing and give us another son.

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#6 Oct 31, 2008
The Companion
It was a scarce few days later when Mr.Meagles paid a call to the newly married pair, with special company. This company, as Mr.Meagles called it as he addressed the Clennams in the drawing room, was a girl brought as companion and help to Amy, if she would accept. Presented to them was a girl of perhaps five and twenty, with dark hair hanging loose around her shoulders and a plain brown dress and worn but fringed shawl. The girl's bonnet hung from its strings in her right hand, and a loaded basket (with a red shawl covering its contents) in her left. The girl had a quiet but direct expression in her dark eyes, as she was willing to accept her position but knew she deserved better. Mr.Meagles introduced this company as "Anne Belchier-a foundling from France." At the word "foundling" the girl's eyes showed fire, and the lips narrowed and the expression hardened. This was surely a expression that the girl hated. As Mr.Meagles said it, Anne had been brought from France to learn a better life, and had been brought up in Meagles' practical household, where she soon became of use in the kitchen, being soon skilled in all kinds of cookery.

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#7 Oct 31, 2008
The Companion-Part 2
This girl had made herself invaluable to Mrs.Tickit, and would have made herself in position for succession into the post of housekeeper- until Mr.Meagles saw her as a practical addition to the Clennam household. Anne had seen Mr.Clennam often during her term of ten years' service in the Meagles house, but in the position of kitchen-maid, was not in the position to speak with him. Mr.Meagles asked if Anne was in the position to be of service to Mr.Clennam and his wife, and Anne replied, "Yes." Then, "I don't do well with children," Anne added stiffly. "She should find herself well in the kitchen," Arthur said. Amy said that Anne should be allowed to do as she wished, and thus Mr.Meagles and Anne followed Amy downstairs. There, Amy showed Anne the ground-floor rooms, and the bedroom and parlor, which she could furnish at her pleasure.
Anne told Amy her story, that she was always well treated and never in want but she felt disadvantaged by the Meagles daughter, who she described as "incessantly spoiled". Thus Anne took her retreat in the kitchen, where she found relief and considered "something close to a equal" in the eyes of the housekeeper, Mrs.Tickit. Anne found her new situation welcoming, as she would have the chance at managing a household versus a situation where she might not succeed to the vital situation for many years.

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#8 Nov 1, 2008
A Evening with the Girls
This particular evening, Arthur left the Works earlier than usual, where he had tea with his daughters (Caroline,then age 4, Fanny, then age 3) and then went to the nursery to play with them. The nursery was one of two rooms that had been made from the old sitting-room, and contained small beds and a dolls' house and dolls, all furnished by the Sessant family. Arthur was invited to sit at a small table in one corner, where he was introduced to the dolls and the dolls introduced to him. There were five dolls, each seated in a chair round the table. The dolls then had their tea, and Arthur was then directed to the dolls' house, as the dolls were told he must "see the property."
After being informed the "master of the house" is out on business, Arthur introduces a scenario of his own. "Perhaps he has business with the government, and at the offices, is met by a stodgy porter at the door, who barely acknowledges his existence. He then has to wait numerous hours in a lofty hall, where business goes in but it never comes out. He is shown in to a Barnacle, clinging precariously to his post. This Barnacle knows nothing but thinks you only want to know, you know. He quits the office in disgust, certain that a Britannia wrapped in such red tape will never come up for air, but shall surely be smothered." (The governess) Melinda is there, and it being evening, Arthur leaves her to tend to the children while he retires to the drawing room to read before going to bed.

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#9 Nov 2, 2008
The Birth of the First Child (Script Form)
(In Victorian times, pregnancy required the expecting mother to be in bed a certain amount of time. Amy is due soon, and is thus spending most of her time in bed. One morning in October 1858, Amy wakes up in bed.)
Amy(breathing heavily):I think the baby is coming now.
Arthur:I'll fetch someone directly.
(Arthur dresses quickly, and asks the maid Anne to prepare for childbirth, then sends someone to fetch a doctor. Arthur soon returns to Amy's side, and does what he can to comfort her.)
Midwife(enters room):I hear the lady's to have a baby.
Arthur: That is right.
Midwife:I'm a midwife from Hatton Garden. They sent for me just now.
Arthur: You're quite welcome. Any help is surely needed.
(Midwife goes to attend Amy)

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#10 Nov 2, 2008
The Birth of the First Child-Continued
(While the midwife is in attendance, Arthur leaves briefly to get breakfast. The doctor soon arrives, and Amy is now obviously in labor. The doctor set a open bottle at Amy's nose, and soon she relaxes. The doctor then works with the midwife in delivery of the baby. Anne brings hot water and clean cloths, and the midwife cleans the newborn.)
Doctor: A healthy little girl.
Midwife: Red haired.(washing baby)
(Doctor goes to the kitchen to report to Arthur, who is eating.)
Doctor: You have a daughter, born only momentarily beforehand.
(Arthur goes to the bedroom to see the baby, and tears are in his eyes as he spots the tiny newborn, wrapped in flannel cloths, lying at her mother's breast. Amy soon awakes from the anesthesia.)
Amy (softly) Our child.
(Amy slowly hands the baby to Arthur. Arthur holds the baby carefully, its head cradled in one hand. Tears drip freely from Arthur's eyes, as he is full of emotion, as he never thought that this day would come, that he would someday hold a child of his own.)
Amy: We are alone. You can cry. This is a moment for both of us.
(Arthur handed the baby back to Amy, who soon nurses the child. Arthur lays his head on the side of the pillow beside Amy's head and cries softly.)
Amy:I've chosen a name. Caroline for the Lady Sessant, Anne for our maid.
Arthur(stifling sobs):That's fine. Your choice.
(Arthur soon had to get control of himself, as Anne comes in to tell that the news has spread throughout the Yard and visitors are waiting to come in.)

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#11 Nov 3, 2008
Dinner Party at the Sessant House (Script Form)
(December evening in Cavendish Square, at the corner of Harley Street and Cavendish Square. The big Sessant mansion stands at the corner, and is a imposing stone building surrounded by gardens and outbuildings. The house is decorated for Christmas (with evergreen and holly cuttings) and lights glow form all windows on the front. The carriage bearing Arthur and Amy Clennam is drawn up to the front door, and the Clennams are assisted out of the carriage and inside by footmen in blue livery. The Clennams are then directed to the parlor, where they wait with a few other couples. Several minutes later, a footman comes in.)
Footman:You are invited to entertain the family.
(The footman directs the Clennams and others down a long hall to the ballroom. The ballroom is very large, and has a high ceiling with candles flickering from chandeliers hung from the ceiling or from wall sconces, as with everything in the ballroom, highly ornamented. The pattern (of the walls) is a pale blue accented with darker shades of blue and gold. In the near corner, a string orchestra is playing, with dancing couples not far away. At the far end, a piano decorated in gold scrolling sits, with a divan on which their hostess sits, the Lady Sessant. Richard Sessant stands nearby, his hair appearing light in the candlelight. As Richard approaches, Amy notices the presence of her sister Fanny and rushes off to speak with her.)
Fanny: Oh, the person to be seen with!
Amy:I'm very sorry. Both of us were invited.
Fanny(sighs):The lady tells me he is her relation. What am I to say about that?
(Meanwhile, Richard Sessant approaches Arthur, and the Lady Sessant gets up and walks toward Arthur. The Lady Sessant is attractive and has a satin dress and ostrich feather fan. Arthur is surprised to see her approach him.)
Richard Sessant:I think you can ascertain this is my mother.
Arthur(nervously):Yes.
Richard Sessant: Be of ease. My mother's bark is far worse than her bite.
(Lady Sessant comes up to Arthur and embraces him, and kisses his cheek.)
Lady Sessant:At last. My long-lost relation.
(Lady Sessant pauses to whisper something into Richard's ear.)
Lady Sessant: You can come along with me.
(Arthur, surprised, follows the Lady Sessant to the divan. He is invited to sit on one end of the divan, and does so. Arthur however is in shock at all this, and does not understand how a woman of her position could have interest in him, much less claim a kinship to him.)

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#12 Nov 3, 2008
Sessant Dinner Party-Part 2
(Amy soon returns to Arthur, and word comes that the dinner is ready. So, many servants come out and escort the Sessants and their guests to the dining room. The guests are then seated at several tables, with the family at a head table nearest the kitchen door. The Clennams are seated at the head table not far from the Lady Sessant at the head of the table. Fine china and silver are arranged neatly on the tables, and very large silver urns sit on the center of each table, with silver bowls of condiments and sweets nearby. Servants bring in carts laden with food of all descriptions, and soup is ladled from the urns as a first course. Candlelight caused the glass and silver to sparkle, and servants fill plates as the soup is finished. Dishes of many descriptions are available, and no guest can complain of not having what they want to eat. There is a great deal of food that has been prepared, and more food is being brought from the kitchen as the carts are emptied. Wine is provided as well as water, in glass decanters and available on request. The conversation at the tables seem to center on travel abroad.)
Man:You, sir, have you seen the Sphinx-in Egypt?
Arthur:Yes. I have.
Man:You know of its mystery?
Arthur:Yes, but it I do not understand.
(Man gives his opinion on the mystery of the Sphinx.)
Woman:I wonder if the Sessants will be going to Venice this year.
Amy:I know they were in Venice the previous year, as that is where I first became acquainted with them.
Woman:You know, my dear, the young Mr.Sessant is notorious for obtaining the most expensive lodgings on the Grand Canal for the family, and he will also reserve the warm-baths for the comfort of her Ladyship.
Amy:Arthur, have you seen the Grand Canal?
Arthur:Unfortunately, I have not.
Amy:If we could afford it, would you go to Venice?
Arthur:If the money was there, there wouldn't be anything we could not do.
(After the dinner, a variety of desserts are offered, including white-iced cake with a silver platter of oranges, each served with its peel split into quarters and pulled back onto itself. Tea is then served, and the guests soon are free to return to the ballroom for the remaining part of the party.)

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#13 Nov 3, 2008
Sessant Dinner Party- Part 3
(The Clennams were soon invited to a dancing class hosted by Richard Sessant, in one corner of the ballroom. The class is soon lined up and taught several steps, they are awkward at first but soon learn quickly. In several minutes, the class is able to join the dancers at the orchestra end of the ballroom. After the dances, parlor games are played, and Arthur and Amy are surprised at their skill in the games, which they had never played before. Punch and sweets are offered, and final toasts made before time to go home. The Sessants thanked the guests for coming before wrappings are collected and the guests are escorted to their carriages.)

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#14 Nov 3, 2008
The Dinner Party-On the Way Home
Arthur however cannot stop thinking of what he had learned that night. He fully expressed to Amy that he had second thoughts on him having kinship to the Sessants. Arthur even wondered if this really was true, weighing it against what he had known of his family from Mrs. Clennam. Amy asked what he knew of his family, and Arthur, thinking of this, realized he knew very little. He could only name his father and uncle, and Mrs. Clennam. Then, Amy put forward that there could be this unknown possibility. Arthur then realized that a kinship to the Sessants was beginning to look more real to him. And, regarding their social relations, having a blood relation to a family of position was very much of advantage, if not giving them a chance of a solid place within society.

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#15 Nov 6, 2008
Affery's Situation (After Mrs.Clennam's Death)
Script Form
(Affery was left alone when Mrs.Clennam died. Being she had ben brought into the Clennam family when young, and had been isolated from any connections so many years, she was thus quite alone in the world. Her only option was to find Arthur and see if he could help her. So Affery took what little she had and headed toward Bleeding Heart Yard. At Gray's Inn, Affery was lost, and was heading to ask someone where to go, when Arthur rode up on Bluebird. Affery signaled to him.)
Arthur: Affery?
Affery: Here, Arthur. I need to ask something of you.
(Arthur rides to Affery's side)
Arthur: What is it you need?
Affery: I, you know, have no connections and are in need of a place.
Arthur:I'm certain we have a place for you.
(Arthur leads Affery to the Yard, and thus to the Works. Arthur leaves her there and returns to his errand. Affery thus asks for Amy, and a worker thus leads her upstairs. Affery explains her situation to Amy.)
Affery:I have a need for work and lodgings, having no family and no knowledge of any connections for many years.
Amy:Don't worry. We have a place for you here.
(After Arthur returns, Amy meets with him and they decide to let Affery be their personal maid.)
Amy: She could also be of help with the children if I and Melinda are out working with sister Fanny.
Arthur: Of course.
Amy:That would be of much use to Fanny.
Arthur: Yes, indeed.

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#16 Nov 13, 2008
The Girls Begin School (Script Form)
(Caroline is now five years old, and time has come for her to begin her lessons. The governess Melinda will teach her. However, not long after lessons had begun, there is a situation of which Melinda must speak to Arthur. Change to drawing room, late afternoon. Arthur is reading newspaper.)
Melinda: Please forgive my intrusion, but there is a matter of which I must speak to you.
Arthur(setting down newspaper): What is it?
Melinda: It concerns the lessons which I am having with Caroline. Little Fanny has taken the fancy to join us in the lessons.
Arthur: That is certainly of interest. However, I would not concern myself with the young girl taking interest in the lessons. She may wish not to be left out, and it might be possible the child's interest may fall off, though it might just as well continue.
(Fanny is allowed to continue lessons, though there is certainly interest when Fanny's interest does not "fall off", but instead, continues, if not stronger than ever. In the fall of 1864, Caroline began school, and would attend school just outside the Yard, not very far away. Fanny continued lessons at home, and would begin school a year later. Caroline is escorted to school by a member of the Plornish family.)

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#17 Nov 13, 2008
Peter Plornish(speaking to Caroline):The mistress would surely be surprised to see you're not one of the poor children. But she'll be glad to have you anyway.
(Later meeting between Amy and Arthur)
Amy:Caroline has spoken to me of quite interesting individuals of which attend school with her.
Arthur: Certainly.
Amy: She has spoken of a family there named Merdle.
Arthur:Oh?
Amy:Yes. According to what Caroline tells me, they are a poor family.
Arthur: And,unfortunately, persons of that name have little chance of being anything else.
Amy: That is right.
(In the fall of 1865, Fanny begins school. Amy is expecting as well.)
Caroline (to Fanny): Don't be too anxious to tell the children at school what is going on with Mother. They are apt to start fancying all sorts of things.
Fanny:Why is that so?
Caroline:It just is. You cannot ask any questions. They just think you're different because they know we're part of society.

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#18 Nov 14, 2008
The Birth of a Son (Script Form)
(In the early months of 1866, Amy is expecting another child. Not long afterward, the midwife is called for Amy.)
Arthur(at Works-seeing Melinda rushing out):Is the baby coming now?
Melinda: Yes. Affery is with her.
Arthur:That is good. Please send word to me if you need a horse.
(Melinda fetches the midwife, and the midwife works Amy through the childbirth. Soon, Affery is sent to inform Arthur of the birth.)
Affery (opening door to counting-house):You now have a son. He's the spitting image of you, I say, and should be named for you. What do you say?
Arthur:I have no objections, if you think so and Amy has no objections.
(Affery quickly leaves)

Since: Jul 08

Waynesboro, VA

#19 Nov 14, 2008
(It is later finalized to name the boy Arthur, and the infant is soon christened Arthur Daniel Clennam. Not long afterward, Amy and Arthur make a decision on a important matter.)
Arthur: What I will inform you of (pause) is that I will not pressure you regarding having more children. Already having suffered one loss, and hearing so much of children being lost...
Amy:You fear it may happen again.
Arthur:I do. But I will trust your judgement. I cannot ask for any more children unless there is another loss.
Amy:I accept your wisdom. And you have certainly been wise in your kindness to me.
Arthur:Thank you.
(However, the children are all doing well by the end of 1866, and there is no more interest made in having any more children.)

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