Felton relives the days of silent movies

Felton relives the days of silent movies

There are 5 comments on the Santa Cruz Sentinel story from Jul 23, 2009, titled Felton relives the days of silent movies. In it, Santa Cruz Sentinel reports that:

When you think old movies, you might think Cary Grant, Barbara Stanwyck, MGM musicals or John Ford Westerns.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Santa Cruz Sentinel.

My two cents

Watsonville, CA

#1 Jul 23, 2009
"a 1917 picture starring Mary Pickford, who was, at the time, one of the world's most famous actors."

Typically, A female "actor" is referred to
as an "ACTRESS." But what do I Know?
John Galt

Santa Cruz, CA

#2 Jul 23, 2009
I give up.

What DO you know ?
Golly

Santa Cruz, CA

#3 Jul 23, 2009
My two cents wrote:
A female "actor" is referred to
as an "ACTRESS."
"Actress" is so last century...
The real Realist

Santa Clara, CA

#4 Jul 24, 2009
My two cents wrote:
"a 1917 picture starring Mary Pickford, who was, at the time, one of the world's most famous actors."
Typically, A female "actor" is referred to
as an "ACTRESS." But what do I Know?
I think that when refered to as a collective, they are called "actors", although they should be called Egoists.
Professor Pat

Los Altos, CA

#5 Jul 30, 2009
My two cents wrote:
"a 1917 picture starring Mary Pickford, who was, at the time, one of the world's most famous actors."
Typically, A female "actor" is referred to
as an "ACTRESS." But what do I Know?
Here's the official word on correct usage/definition of "actor":

The word actor refers to a person who acts regardless of sex, while actress refers specifically to a female person who acts; therefore a female can be referred to by either term. The Oxford English Dictionary states that originally "'actor" was used for both sexes. The English word actress does not derive from the Latin actrix, probably not even by way of French actrice; according to the Oxford English Dictionary, actress was "probably formed independently" in English. As actress is a specifically feminine word, some feminists assert that the word is sexist. Gender-neutral usage of actor has re-emerged in modern English,[4][5] especially when referring to male and female performers collectively, but actress remains the common term used in major acting awards given to female recipients and is still common in general usage.

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