Groundhogs invade New York backyard

Groundhogs invade New York backyard

There are 19 comments on the KXAM-TV Austin story from Jul 12, 2010, titled Groundhogs invade New York backyard. In it, KXAM-TV Austin reports that:

In the 1980 movie "Caddyshack," Bill Murray plays Carl Spackler, a man gone crazy trying to rid a golf course of gophers.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at KXAM-TV Austin.

“behind curtain #1”

Since: Jul 08

Location hidden

#1 Jul 12, 2010
Woodchucks are better than up chucks.
Arminius

Buffalo, NY

#2 Jul 13, 2010
Obviously undocumented Mexican rodents squatting on American soil!

Father_Theresa

“There is no God...”

Since: Apr 10

But there IS Vengeance!

#3 Jul 13, 2010
OMG! They have woodchucks, raccoons, opossums, squirrels AND rats??? Why, it's like living in 95% of America! Next thing you know, they'll have BIRDS!!!

crab_man 101

Since: Mar 10

Location hidden

#4 Jul 13, 2010
"Marge! It's getting out of control! I saw two flies and an ANT today!"
Jim Beam

Huntington, NY

#5 Jul 13, 2010
Just trap the little buggers like I did.....and then drive them far away and set them free.

:-)

Since: Feb 09

Location hidden

#6 Jul 13, 2010
Father_Theresa wrote:
OMG! They have woodchucks, raccoons, opossums, squirrels AND rats??? Why, it's like living in 95% of America! Next thing you know, they'll have BIRDS!!!
our backyard has been invaded by some kind of nasty looking wasps have nests in the ground getting to the point I am afraid to let the dogs out want to set the little fockers on fire but afraid the yard will catch fire too dry here

Father_Theresa

“There is no God...”

Since: Apr 10

But there IS Vengeance!

#7 Jul 13, 2010
joann in pa wrote:
<quoted text>
our backyard has been invaded by some kind of nasty looking wasps have nests in the ground getting to the point I am afraid to let the dogs out want to set the little fockers on fire but afraid the yard will catch fire too dry here
Okay...do they come from one hole, or does each seem to have it's own hole? Little, or orange and so big that when they fly by you feel a breeze and go WTF???

If coming from one hole they are probably yellowjackets of one kind or another. Simple solution- get some screen make a cone 6-8" arcoss, 18" long (involves unskilled sewing with heavy thread). Make another cone same diameter but 6" long to fit inside it, and cut a hole in the tip 1/4" across. Cut four notches 1" long (like you were going to cut it in quarters) in the big open end so you can fold out a brim- now it should look like a dunce cap. Wait for late night, bring your cone, a few rocks to put around the brim, and a flashlight. Put the flashlight on the ground on the opposite side of hole from you (if any fly out, they will head for the flashlight) and quickly place cone over hole and weight it down. Did I say quickly? and GTFout!
The next morning they will crawl out of the hole, up the iner cone, into the big closed cone and be trapped. Go out and spray with wasp spray whenever you see an accumulation. There may be thousands. Those that slept out overnight may dig their way in under the brim, but eventually they will all be trapped in the cone. When nest seems dead, empty trap by pulling out inner cone and save for another day. Big versions made of aluminum screen can be used on honeybees inside walls of home- just staple brim to house!

If they are single animals, each with their own hole, they are VERY tolerant and only sting if really provoked, although they'll buzz around you, Communal bees and wasps have a chip on their shoulder, solitary animals are pretty mellow. The big orangeish ones I mentioned about (pinkie sized) are cicada killers, usually dig in sandy soil, make a golfball diameter hole 3 feet long. I've actually walked into places where they were buzzing around the store window inside with people screaming, held my hand above them until they crawled on, and walked them out the door, lol! People think I'm nuts. I am. They have a stinger almost a centimeter long, and I've heard if you're stung you should immediately lay down in and open place where you won't bump your head and start screaming and thrashing violently, because you're going to anyways in a few second...might as well just get it over with...
The big blue black wasps are solitary too, and will often land and walk on you without stinging.

Since: Feb 09

Location hidden

#8 Jul 13, 2010
Father_Theresa wrote:
<quoted text>
Okay...do they come from one hole, or does each seem to have it's own hole? Little, or orange and so big that when they fly by you feel a breeze and go WTF???
If coming from one hole they are probably yellowjackets of one kind or another. Simple solution- get some screen make a cone 6-8" arcoss, 18" long (involves unskilled sewing with heavy thread). Make another cone same diameter but 6" long to fit inside it, and cut a hole in the tip 1/4" across. Cut four notches 1" long (like you were going to cut it in quarters) in the big open end so you can fold out a brim- now it should look like a dunce cap. Wait for late night, bring your cone, a few rocks to put around the brim, and a flashlight. Put the flashlight on the ground on the opposite side of hole from you (if any fly out, they will head for the flashlight) and quickly place cone over hole and weight it down. Did I say quickly? and GTFout!
The next morning they will crawl out of the hole, up the iner cone, into the big closed cone and be trapped. Go out and spray with wasp spray whenever you see an accumulation. There may be thousands. Those that slept out overnight may dig their way in under the brim, but eventually they will all be trapped in the cone. When nest seems dead, empty trap by pulling out inner cone and save for another day. Big versions made of aluminum screen can be used on honeybees inside walls of home- just staple brim to house!
If they are single animals, each with their own hole, they are VERY tolerant and only sting if really provoked, although they'll buzz around you, Communal bees and wasps have a chip on their shoulder, solitary animals are pretty mellow. The big orangeish ones I mentioned about (pinkie sized) are cicada killers, usually dig in sandy soil, make a golfball diameter hole 3 feet long. I've actually walked into places where they were buzzing around the store window inside with people screaming, held my hand above them until they crawled on, and walked them out the door, lol! People think I'm nuts. I am. They have a stinger almost a centimeter long, and I've heard if you're stung you should immediately lay down in and open place where you won't bump your head and start screaming and thrashing violently, because you're going to anyways in a few second...might as well just get it over with...
The big blue black wasps are solitary too, and will often land and walk on you without stinging.
they have many nests kind of like a minefield out there. about 1" long with yellow and black striped tail. don't seem aggressive but we did find a dead baby bunny near their nest and wondering if they attacked the bunny? the swarm just keeps growing sometimes there will be 50 or so swarming around during the heat of the day. usually I live and let live but I am afraid they may sting the dogs and yes when the fly by my head they give me the willies especially since I am allergic and have an epipen but don't know if I could poke myself with that

Father_Theresa

“There is no God...”

Since: Apr 10

But there IS Vengeance!

#9 Jul 13, 2010
joann in pa wrote:
<quoted text>
they have many nests kind of like a minefield out there. about 1" long with yellow and black striped tail. don't seem aggressive but we did find a dead baby bunny near their nest and wondering if they attacked the bunny? the swarm just keeps growing sometimes there will be 50 or so swarming around during the heat of the day. usually I live and let live but I am afraid they may sting the dogs and yes when the fly by my head they give me the willies especially since I am allergic and have an epipen but don't know if I could poke myself with that
Sounds like some kind of grasshopper wasp. There's a flying cricket that comes out this time of year that they hunt and bury for their young. Those guys usually aren't as tolerant as a lot of solitary wasps. Lucky you. They're even awake at night, though not flying, just digging new holes and enlarging old ones- you can watch them at night with a flashlight from a distance...the cicada killers do that, too.

Spray the ground with wasp spray at night- again put the flashlight AWAY from you!-aim it at the holes- might take a few nights. Sevin dust (I prefer the dust over the liquid) will do the trick as well. Spread it liberally over the ground at night. Gotta keep the dog away from that area for a few days, and after you've seen it works, water the grass liberally for a few days, then it should be safe for the dog.

Bee sting allergy MIGHT not be a problem. Each species has different venom. I only reacted to honeybees and bumblebees, wasp stings never caused a problem, but that's not to say you'll be safe if stung. Epi pen? JUST DO IT, don't think or hesitate- you won't even feel it, and don't forget the benadryl.

Since: Feb 09

Location hidden

#10 Jul 13, 2010
Father_Theresa wrote:
<quoted text>Sounds like some kind of grasshopper wasp. There's a flying cricket that comes out this time of year that they hunt and bury for their young. Those guys usually aren't as tolerant as a lot of solitary wasps. Lucky you. They're even awake at night, though not flying, just digging new holes and enlarging old ones- you can watch them at night with a flashlight from a distance...the cicada killers do that, too.
Spray the ground with wasp spray at night- again put the flashlight AWAY from you!-aim it at the holes- might take a few nights. Sevin dust (I prefer the dust over the liquid) will do the trick as well. Spread it liberally over the ground at night. Gotta keep the dog away from that area for a few days, and after you've seen it works, water the grass liberally for a few days, then it should be safe for the dog.
Bee sting allergy MIGHT not be a problem. Each species has different venom. I only reacted to honeybees and bumblebees, wasp stings never caused a problem, but that's not to say you'll be safe if stung. Epi pen? JUST DO IT, don't think or hesitate- you won't even feel it, and don't forget the benadryl.
thanks O! will try the sevin dust. tried to find a pic on google the closest thing they resemble is an eastern maryland wasp (rick) wasp? hehe and you are right they must make new nests at night cause everyday new ones appear
Jim Beam

Huntington, NY

#11 Jul 13, 2010
joann in pa wrote:
<quoted text>
our backyard has been invaded by some kind of nasty looking wasps have nests in the ground getting to the point I am afraid to let the dogs out want to set the little fockers on fire but afraid the yard will catch fire too dry here
Put mothballs in or near the openings that they are going in and out of........they will soon vacate that area. My landscaper neighbor taught me this trick and it has worked for me a few times..

Good luck.

Since: Feb 09

Location hidden

#12 Jul 13, 2010
Jim Beam wrote:
<quoted text>
Put mothballs in or near the openings that they are going in and out of........they will soon vacate that area. My landscaper neighbor taught me this trick and it has worked for me a few times..
Good luck.
okay sevin dust and mothballs will do much better than pouring gas and flicking matches

thanks

Father_Theresa

“There is no God...”

Since: Apr 10

But there IS Vengeance!

#13 Jul 13, 2010
joann in pa wrote:
<quoted text>
okay sevin dust and mothballs will do much better than pouring gas and flicking matches
thanks
But ya gotta admit, the gas and matches are fun...!

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#14 Jul 13, 2010
shoot them all!!!!

“"Eatin' Ain't Cheatin!"”

Since: Sep 06

Thompson's Station, Tn

#15 Jul 13, 2010
Ground hogs, woodchucks, whistle pigs.
Skunks, woodpussies, polecats.
None of these exist in Portugal.
What was God thinking when he created a possum?

Since: Jun 10

Location hidden

#16 Jul 13, 2010
Mexican Hillbilly wrote:
Ground hogs, woodchucks, whistle pigs.
Skunks, woodpussies, polecats.
None of these exist in Portugal.
What was God thinking when he created a possum?
More target practice!
Pretty Feet

Philadelphia, PA

#17 Jul 14, 2010
well they're here too, but as long as they stay down by the shed, ive got no problem with a boarder.
:O)

“"Eatin' Ain't Cheatin!"”

Since: Sep 06

Thompson's Station, Tn

#18 Jul 15, 2010
While walking in the hot sun I always seem to see a bloated dead groundhog lying on his back on the berm of the road. I also manage to find a whiskey bottle or a beer bottle that I stick in the dead animal's armpit to make it look like he is just drunk. My friends say, "Yuo ain't right?!"

“"Eatin' Ain't Cheatin!"”

Since: Sep 06

Thompson's Station, Tn

#19 Jul 15, 2010
When raccoons are dead on the side of the road they are normally on their back also. The hot sun bloats them so one of their arms is raised. When I drive by them I wave back to the raccoon. My wife says, Tu es horrivel!"

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