Ural Timing
Dennis Melcher

Mayer, AZ

#1 May 23, 2007
I have 2002 patrol with only 7800 km, it was running great yesterday, this morning she began to lose power, idle very slowly, backfire. Gas was the same tank 91oct, nothing had changed! I checked the timing, the bolts were tight, but it was running like it was out of time. So I changed the timing slightly and she began to perfect.??????\
Can anyone tell me, is there some reason why the timing set would change so suddenly, is there something that might have slipped?
Also what is the correct timing?
Peter

United States

#2 Dec 12, 2008
I have no idea why the timing changed so suddenly. Probably something was loose.

The timing is set with the engine not running - no timing light etc. Just line up some marks. Here's how.

Put the bike on the center stand so the rear wheel is off the ground. Remove the spark plugs so the engine will turn easily. Put the bike in gear - third or fourth is good.

There is a little window cut in the bell housing on the rear of the engine and in front ot the transmission. It may have a rubber plug in it, if so, remove the plug.

Get down so you can see the side of the flywheel through the little window. There are two timing marks on the flywheel that tell you the position of the crank. These marks can be faint and hard to see - when you finally find them, a drop of nail polish can make future timing adjustments easier.

Slowly turn the rear wheel as though the bike was rolling forward. The first mark that comes into view is the firing mark, it's a couple of degrees before TDC. Use the firing mark to adjust timing. The second mark, about a inch later, is TDC and is used for adjusting the valves.

When you have the firing mark in the center of the window, remove the engine's front cover.

You'll see the ignition puck. It has a scale of advance and retard marks on it and there are two set screws. The center mark is longer than the others and is the one you'll use. There' also a firing mark on the engine block right by puck.

Loosen the set screws and turn the puck so the long center mark alines with the mark on the engine block. Tighten the set screws and butto0n everything up - you're done. Easy and takes 15 minutes.

Two things to bear in mind:

First. If the marks on the puck are 180 degrees from the mark on the engine block - rotate the engine one turn until the firing mark returns to the window. These are four-stroke engines and it takes two revolutions to reach the firing point.

Seond. The ignition puck is held together with several spot welds. These welds have a history of braking. Then timing will be all over the place because the puck is not coordinated with the crank anymore.

Peter
John H

Orlando, FL

#3 Dec 17, 2008
Was interested in a Ural.. Do you like yours?
Peter

United States

#4 Dec 19, 2008
Who, me? Do I like it? Yeah, it's the most fun you can have with your pants on.

These are strange, quirky things. Mine's not particularly reliable, but I've had it apart a couple of times, and I've tinkered with it quite a bit. So I can keep it running and parts haven't been a problem at all.

My Ural is a '99. The newer ones are much more reliable. There's been some design changes and to improve reliability and quality has improved.

I think the newer bikes have lost their soul a bit to get that reliabilty. For example, the spare will fit any of the three wheels on my rig. But, the newer rigs have a disk front brake and the spare won't go on the front. But, basically they're the same bikes.

I'd do it again. Warts and all, it's a great bike.

Peter
francesco

Brentwood, CA

#5 May 7, 2009
Hello There. Peter I saw you know something about timing. I live in California and I have a lot of problems with the timing of my Ural M66 vintage 1974. could you help me please? I fitted new carbs k301 running well,new point plate and the bike was fine until a mechanic messed it up.

I really apreciate

Francesco
Sean

Rocky Mount, NC

#6 Jul 8, 2009
Hi Peter,
You say you have no problem getting parts...where do you get them? I need a mixing bowl of doom for a 650.

thanks
Peter wrote:
Who, me? Do I like it? Yeah, it's the most fun you can have with your pants on.
These are strange, quirky things. Mine's not particularly reliable, but I've had it apart a couple of times, and I've tinkered with it quite a bit. So I can keep it running and parts haven't been a problem at all.
My Ural is a '99. The newer ones are much more reliable. There's been some design changes and to improve reliability and quality has improved.
I think the newer bikes have lost their soul a bit to get that reliabilty. For example, the spare will fit any of the three wheels on my rig. But, the newer rigs have a disk front brake and the spare won't go on the front. But, basically they're the same bikes.
I'd do it again. Warts and all, it's a great bike.
Peter
robert

Saint Petersburg, FL

#7 Apr 2, 2011
peter,
well said! i have an "01" deco classic. high maintenance.
john in orlando. see jean at hallowpaw corvette. hes by the orlando airport and one of the original ural guys. he's old, knowledgeable and eccentric, just like the motorcycles. Love that guy.

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