Soldiers choose war over bleak economy

Soldiers choose war over bleak economy

There are 23 comments on the www.msnbc.msn.com story from Dec 2, 2008, titled Soldiers choose war over bleak economy. In it, www.msnbc.msn.com reports that:

Sgt. Ryan Nyhus spent 14 months patrolling the deadly streets of Baghdad, where five members of his platoon were shot and one died. As bad as that was, he would rather go back there than take his chances in this brutal job market.

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GR8REVIL

Anniston, AL

#29 Dec 3, 2008
womanspirit wrote:
This is terribly sad. To choose the military as a career because it is your passion is much different than this. Considering the large number of soldiers returning with massive mental and physical problems related to this war - it really is rather sad to hear this. On the other hand - in terms of the war(s) in which we are engaged - we need the military staff badly. The return of staff over and over again to the war zones is part of why the mental and physical problmes are at the high numbers they are at. I pray for all of them .
wow I guess you are a military analyst, you know so much about what our troops go through. Do you honestly think that there are any more soldiers suffering from mental injuries than in other wars. Don't cheapen our soldiers with your pity. Our soldiers are obviously not weak civilians. I would know, hoorah!
Skeptic

Houston, TX

#30 Dec 4, 2008
braveheart wrote:
What we need is funds for our kids that are getting out of the military service to help them until they find jobs.
it should be funded by corporate oil.
I agree that we owe those who served in Afghanistan, Kuwait and Iraq more than we can repay and it sounds so easy to say,“it should be funded by corporate oil” but look a little further.

The large oil companies ALREADY pay more to governments (federal, state and local, here and outside the U. S.) than they make in profits. Taking the largest, ExxonMobil as an example, they made $40.6 billion in 2007 but paid $105.7 billion to various governments.

Secondly, NO company really pays even a penny in taxes. Every cent they pay to any government is merely added to the price of their products and paid by their customers. If a particular business doesn’t make enough profit AFTER they pay governments, they merely discontinue that business (or go bankrupt). On this basis any tax added to, for example gasoline is regressive (lower income people pay a greater fraction of their earnings for that tax than those with higher incomes). A Wal-Mart employee may drive a little less in a vehicle with better gas mileage than a millionaire in his Rolls Royce but the difference in what gasoline costs them each year is far less than their difference in incomes.

Finally, by far the largest share of the income of each of the 6 largest, stockholder-owned integrated oil companies (ExxonMobil, Chevron and Conoco Phillips here, BP, Shell and Total owned elsewhere) is earned OUTSIDE the U. S. Again using ExxonMobil as an example, 75% of that $40.6 billion they earned was earned OUTSIDE the U. S. As you might expect they also SPEND more (and pay more to governments) OUTSIDE the U. S. than here. Increasing costs here would merely lead them (and the others) to REDUCE U. S. spending and, if it made operations here unprofitable, even to leave the U. S. entirely. At the last ExxonMobil stockholder’s meeting their CEO, Rex Tillerson, was asked if any consideration had been given to doing precisely that. His answer began “Not seriously,” then continued with how the company had “deep roots” here. However they (following BP’s lead) have announced that they plan to sell or otherwise dispose of every retail gas station they own. They, and other of the largest companies, have also sold or closed refineries but added capacity to those they kept.

Since: May 08

Location hidden

#31 Dec 5, 2008
GR8REVIL wrote:
<quoted text>
wow I guess you are a military analyst, you know so much about what our troops go through. Do you honestly think that there are any more soldiers suffering from mental injuries than in other wars. Don't cheapen our soldiers with your pity. Our soldiers are obviously not weak civilians. I would know, hoorah!
WOW - YOU ust be a moron to post such a response to my statements WHICH are based on militarty records of soldiers coming out of THIS war- and the stats are based against former wars and those stats for PTS in those times- I was NOT cheapening anything - these are matters of fact you asswipe - I NEVER made any reference to thinking that, or implying in any way, our soldiers are weak- it was YOUR inference of my statements that did that. Nice job dip.

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