A Tale of Two Diagnoses: Records Show How Army Doctors Downgrade PTSD

Aug 10, 2012 Full story: Seattle Weekly 36

How does one doctor diagnose an Iraq war veteran with PTSD while another says the same soldier has a less severe condition called adjustment disorder? Medical records shared by one of the characters in our feature story this week offer some insight into the workings the controversial forensic psychiatry team at Madigan Army Medical Center.

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eilackey

El Paso, TX

#1 Aug 11, 2012
And then they wonder why they go postal like Sgt. Russell at the Camp Liberty Clinic.
HumanSpirit

High Springs, FL

#2 Aug 11, 2012
psychiatry has No science, No medical model, No evidence based medicine and there is no test for chemical imbalance of the brain. The industry is based on fraud.

Death, violence and suscide from SSRI drugs

Soldier Cases

http://www.ssristories.com/index.php...

Public cases

Death, violence, erratic behavior and the suicide by mind drugs

http://ssristories.com/index.php
________

U.S. military: Heavily armed and medicated

Marine Corporal Michael Cataldi woke as he heard the truck rumble past.

He opened his eyes, but saw nothing. It was the middle of the night, and he was facedown in the sands of western Iraq. His loaded M16 was pinned beneath him.

Cataldi had no idea how he'd gotten to where he now lay, some 200 meters from the dilapidated building where his buddies slept. But he suspected what had caused this nightmare: His Klonopin prescription had run out.

His ordeal was not all that remarkable for a person on that anti-anxiety medication. In the lengthy labeling that accompanies each prescription, Klonopin users are warned against abruptly stopping the medicine, since doing so can cause psychosis, hallucinations, and other symptoms. What makes Cataldi's story extraordinary is that he was a U. S. Marine at war, and that the drug's adverse effects endangered lives his own, his fellow Marines', and the lives of any civilians unfortunate enough to cross his path.

"It put everyone within rifle distance at risk," he says.

In deploying an all-volunteer army to fight two ongoing wars, in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Pentagon has increasingly relied on prescription drugs to keep its warriors on the front lines. In recent years, the number of military prescriptions for antidepressants, sleeping pills, and painkillers has risen as soldiers come home with battered bodies and troubled minds. And many of those service members are then sent back to war theaters in distant lands with bottles of medication to fortify them.

According to data from a U. S. Army mental-health survey released last year, about 12 percent of soldiers in Iraq and 15 percent of those in Afghanistan reported taking antidepressants, anti-anxiety medications, or sleeping pills. Prescriptions for painkillers have also skyrocketed. Data from the Department of Defense last fall showed that as of September 2007, prescriptions for narcotics for active-duty troops had risen to almost 50,000 a month, compared with about 33,000 a month in October 2003, not long after the Iraq war began.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30748260/ns/healt...
The Mad Man

Long Beach, CA

#3 Aug 12, 2012
Now here is a point well made...!
In deploying an all-volunteer army to fight two ongoing wars, in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Pentagon has increasingly relied on prescription drugs to keep its warriors on the front lines. In recent years, the number of military prescriptions for antidepressants, sleeping pills, and painkillers has risen as soldiers come home with battered bodies and troubled minds. And many of those service members are then sent back to war theaters in distant lands with bottles of medication to fortify them.
I could add a lot more but this says a lot!!!!
DanCollins888

AOL

#4 Aug 16, 2012
The Mad Man wrote:
Now here is a point well made...!
In deploying an all-volunteer army to fight two ongoing wars, in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Pentagon has increasingly relied on prescription drugs to keep its warriors on the front lines. In recent years, the number of military prescriptions for antidepressants, sleeping pills, and painkillers has risen as soldiers come home with battered bodies and troubled minds. And many of those service members are then sent back to war theaters in distant lands with bottles of medication to fortify them.
I could add a lot more but this says a lot!!!!
Mad Man:__ In the "old days" PTSD symptoms were handled in a simple and direct command, "Shut the fxxk up, and just do your job!" As years passed and career soldiers "continued" to experience extreme PTSD issues, the solution was "simple" ... court martial for malingering.

Been there done that!

If we are fighting "two" wars now...we must have been fighting a "dozen" wars during WWII. How about keeping politics and "political correctness" out of the discussion? Presently we are fighting "one war" on two fronts [not counting several wars on covert fronts].

Today's soldiers grew up on "soft" political correctness, and if someone sees someone else get a "boo-boo" on their elbow, they debrief with a therapist.

My generation grew up on "Howdy Doody" "Gene Autry" "Roy Rogers" and black & white WWII "B" movies with "no blood" "no missing body parts" and "came to reality" in Vietnam where losing several hundred soldiers a week was "routine" and the general order was, "Shut the fxxk up and just do your job!"

PTSD is over-rated. I ought to know, because it took many years for me to get help...and many more years of being warned by the Veterans Administration to keep my mouth shut, or I would be placed on a locked ward [in the old days there were many secrets to hide, and PTSD be damned if it got in the way of secrets].

In the end major PTSD symptoms pass...and it is because "soldiers" [once a soldier, always a soldier] pulls their soldier/civilian selves up by their own boot straps, and makes peace with themselves for being a survivor.

Soldiers must rely on their own ability to heal themselves. Learn all they can on what PTSD is, and apply it to their individual lives. Avoid the traps set by politically correct liberal therapist, and apply knowledge to self-healing.

PTSD is not unique to this generation. Symptoms were first recorded in ancient Roman times, and continue into the present. We are not unique! We are a "Brotherhood" of thousands of years of combat survivors!" Get over it!

Dan Collins - Fircrest
US Army MI/MP [and Vietnam Dustoff Medic] SFC (retired)
The Mad Man
#5 Aug 17, 2012
DanCollins888 wrote:
<quoted text>
Mad Man:__ In the "old days" PTSD symptoms were handled in a simple and direct command, "Shut the fxxk up, and just do your job!" As years passed and career soldiers "continued" to experience extreme PTSD issues, the solution was "simple" ... court martial for malingering.
Been there done that!
If we are fighting "two" wars now...we must have been fighting a "dozen" wars during WWII. How about keeping politics and "political correctness" out of the discussion? Presently we are fighting "one war" on two fronts [not counting several wars on covert fronts].
Today's soldiers grew up on "soft" political correctness, and if someone sees someone else get a "boo-boo" on their elbow, they debrief with a therapist.
My generation grew up on "Howdy Doody" "Gene Autry" "Roy Rogers" and black & white WWII "B" movies with "no blood" "no missing body parts" and "came to reality" in Vietnam where losing several hundred soldiers a week was "routine" and the general order was, "Shut the fxxk up and just do your job!"
PTSD is over-rated. I ought to know, because it took many years for me to get help...and many more years of being warned by the Veterans Administration to keep my mouth shut, or I would be placed on a locked ward [in the old days there were many secrets to hide, and PTSD be damned if it got in the way of secrets].
In the end major PTSD symptoms pass...and it is because "soldiers" [once a soldier, always a soldier] pulls their soldier/civilian selves up by their own boot straps, and makes peace with themselves for being a survivor.
Soldiers must rely on their own ability to heal themselves. Learn all they can on what PTSD is, and apply it to their individual lives. Avoid the traps set by politically correct liberal therapist, and apply knowledge to self-healing.
PTSD is not unique to this generation. Symptoms were first recorded in ancient Roman times, and continue into the present. We are not unique! We are a "Brotherhood" of thousands of years of combat survivors!" Get over it!
Dan Collins - Fircrest
US Army MI/MP [and Vietnam Dustoff Medic] SFC (retired)
Your point is understood but that is what is being done to treat vets now a days, pills and therapy. It takes a strong soldier to let go of the past. History as you have pointed out has proven that but the govt insists on pills and therapy. My father had memories of a dog being eaten by the Germans when he was guarding a prisoner of war camp and I was NEVER allowed to have a dog because of that memory. My father was a Major in the Army and Never talked about what he witnessed. He would only tell me that the memories were too severe. He did tell me about the good time though. He had that memory to replace the bad ones.
The Mad Man
#6 Aug 17, 2012
DanCollins888 wrote:
<quoted text>
Mad Man:__ In the "old days" PTSD symptoms were handled in a simple and direct command, "Shut the fxxk up, and just do your job!" As years passed and career soldiers "continued" to experience extreme PTSD issues, the solution was "simple" ... court martial for malingering.
Been there done that!
If we are fighting "two" wars now...we must have been fighting a "dozen" wars during WWII. How about keeping politics and "political correctness" out of the discussion? Presently we are fighting "one war" on two fronts [not counting several wars on covert fronts].
Today's soldiers grew up on "soft" political correctness, and if someone sees someone else get a "boo-boo" on their elbow, they debrief with a therapist.
My generation grew up on "Howdy Doody" "Gene Autry" "Roy Rogers" and black & white WWII "B" movies with "no blood" "no missing body parts" and "came to reality" in Vietnam where losing several hundred soldiers a week was "routine" and the general order was, "Shut the fxxk up and just do your job!"
PTSD is over-rated. I ought to know, because it took many years for me to get help...and many more years of being warned by the Veterans Administration to keep my mouth shut, or I would be placed on a locked ward [in the old days there were many secrets to hide, and PTSD be damned if it got in the way of secrets].
In the end major PTSD symptoms pass...and it is because "soldiers" [once a soldier, always a soldier] pulls their soldier/civilian selves up by their own boot straps, and makes peace with themselves for being a survivor.
Soldiers must rely on their own ability to heal themselves. Learn all they can on what PTSD is, and apply it to their individual lives. Avoid the traps set by politically correct liberal therapist, and apply knowledge to self-healing.
PTSD is not unique to this generation. Symptoms were first recorded in ancient Roman times, and continue into the present. We are not unique! We are a "Brotherhood" of thousands of years of combat survivors!" Get over it!
Dan Collins - Fircrest
US Army MI/MP [and Vietnam Dustoff Medic] SFC (retired)
Unfortunately, I still read about soldiers and suicide and the horrors of war. That is the sad part of 'getting over it'.
You remember what it is like trying at 'adjust' when you got out. I know I had a hard time and went back in after two years of trying to make it in the civilian world with a federal job and security but was unhappy where I lived (with so many memories of my friends dead) and 'trying to adjust'. I went back into the military and started all over again in another state just to get rid of the memories. I have never been back since. That was my therapy. I then got a job in a hospital emergency room as a supervisor where I had to deal with more death and friends that had died after their military tour and I was the one that took them down to the morgue. That was part of my job. The experience of working in an emergency room was good therapy for me and although this was rough at times, it did toughen me up to deal with the reality of life and death. I did go through grief counseling twice when I was chosen to be power of attorney for two vets because they had no family to take care of them or wanted to even be a part of their lives. That was rough to understand and deal with.
I have faced my own mortality years ago when I became disabled and need a caregiver but for some reason I am still alive today and I am not asking any questions. Life has made me tough but pills and counseling don't seem to be the answer.
The Mad Man
#7 Aug 17, 2012
DanCollins888 wrote:
<quoted text>
Mad Man:__ In the "old days" PTSD symptoms were handled in a simple and direct command, "Shut the fxxk up, and just do your job!" As years passed and career soldiers "continued" to experience extreme PTSD issues, the solution was "simple" ... court martial for malingering.
Been there done that!
If we are fighting "two" wars now...we must have been fighting a "dozen" wars during WWII. How about keeping politics and "political correctness" out of the discussion? Presently we are fighting "one war" on two fronts [not counting several wars on covert fronts].
Today's soldiers grew up on "soft" political correctness, and if someone sees someone else get a "boo-boo" on their elbow, they debrief with a therapist.
My generation grew up on "Howdy Doody" "Gene Autry" "Roy Rogers" and black & white WWII "B" movies with "no blood" "no missing body parts" and "came to reality" in Vietnam where losing several hundred soldiers a week was "routine" and the general order was, "Shut the fxxk up and just do your job!"
PTSD is over-rated. I ought to know, because it took many years for me to get help...and many more years of being warned by the Veterans Administration to keep my mouth shut, or I would be placed on a locked ward [in the old days there were many secrets to hide, and PTSD be damned if it got in the way of secrets].
In the end major PTSD symptoms pass...and it is because "soldiers" [once a soldier, always a soldier] pulls their soldier/civilian selves up by their own boot straps, and makes peace with themselves for being a survivor.
Soldiers must rely on their own ability to heal themselves. Learn all they can on what PTSD is, and apply it to their individual lives. Avoid the traps set by politically correct liberal therapist, and apply knowledge to self-healing.
PTSD is not unique to this generation. Symptoms were first recorded in ancient Roman times, and continue into the present. We are not unique! We are a "Brotherhood" of thousands of years of combat survivors!" Get over it!
Dan Collins - Fircrest
US Army MI/MP [and Vietnam Dustoff Medic] SFC (retired)
Unfortunately, reading about soldiers suicides do not help any.
DanCollins888

Auburn, WA

#8 Aug 17, 2012
Mad Man__ I feel your pain, and I know about the suicide option [the early-out syndrome] because I have been there.

The PTSD suicide rate among Vietnam vetrans was extremely high__on the order of the number of KIA's__ approximately 68,000 suicides.

What saved me was my personal guilt for being a survivor, witnessing so many others die. I came to realize my suicide would be completely selfish __ decided to continue punishing myself by grieving for others.

Now, thirty some odd years after one final event pushed me over the edge I can live with myself, I can live with my memories__but I still hate communist, and I still hate traitors.

My survivor guilt, and my hate for the enemy is precisely what landed me in the mess I am in.

More to the point__ soldiers of today even with after-action immediate counseling__ PTSD medication and such are no better prepared for the realities of combat than the Vietnam soldier who grew-up on black and white, no blood television.

It is a universal truth that no matter how much war trauma you "turn-off", sooner or later a "single" event will kick your ass, and open a floodgate of traumatic soul crushing memories.

One possibility we never hear about is reclassification to a different MOS for a few years before returning to the primary MOS and exposure to more of the same war traumas.

Perhaps a break in the cycle can benefit the career soldier, after counseling and a through knowledge of what PTSD is, how to "recognize" surfacing problems, and how to "out-process" those symptoms.

There was a time when strangers would meet in passing__ and the thousand yard stare__the deep unspoken sadness in their eyes told you, you were in the presence of a Vietnam combat veteran.

Lately I have been a frequent visitor to McChord, Fort Lewis, Madigan Hospital, and the VA Hospital.

What impresses me most is seeing "new life" in the eyes of Vietnam combat veterans. Old Soldiers who in the past, passed you by in sad silence, now have a smile in their eyes, on their faces, and crack jokes in passing.

There is life after "intense" PTSD symptoms, but sometimes the process of being "reborn" seems to take forever.

Hang In There Mad Man!

Regards,

DOC Collins - Vietnam Dustoff Medic 1968-69
The Mad Man

Long Beach, CA

#9 Aug 18, 2012
DanCollins888 wrote:
Mad Man__ I feel your pain, and I know about the suicide option [the early-out syndrome] because I have been there.
The PTSD suicide rate among Vietnam vetrans was extremely high__on the order of the number of KIA's__ approximately 68,000 suicides.
What saved me was my personal guilt for being a survivor, witnessing so many others die. I came to realize my suicide would be completely selfish __ decided to continue punishing myself by grieving for others.
Now, thirty some odd years after one final event pushed me over the edge I can live with myself, I can live with my memories__but I still hate communist, and I still hate traitors.
My survivor guilt, and my hate for the enemy is precisely what landed me in the mess I am in.
More to the point__ soldiers of today even with after-action immediate counseling__ PTSD medication and such are no better prepared for the realities of combat than the Vietnam soldier who grew-up on black and white, no blood television.
It is a universal truth that no matter how much war trauma you "turn-off", sooner or later a "single" event will kick your ass, and open a floodgate of traumatic soul crushing memories.
One possibility we never hear about is reclassification to a different MOS for a few years before returning to the primary MOS and exposure to more of the same war traumas.
Perhaps a break in the cycle can benefit the career soldier, after counseling and a through knowledge of what PTSD is, how to "recognize" surfacing problems, and how to "out-process" those symptoms.
There was a time when strangers would meet in passing__ and the thousand yard stare__the deep unspoken sadness in their eyes told you, you were in the presence of a Vietnam combat veteran.
Lately I have been a frequent visitor to McChord, Fort Lewis, Madigan Hospital, and the VA Hospital.
What impresses me most is seeing "new life" in the eyes of Vietnam combat veterans. Old Soldiers who in the past, passed you by in sad silence, now have a smile in their eyes, on their faces, and crack jokes in passing.
There is life after "intense" PTSD symptoms, but sometimes the process of being "reborn" seems to take forever.
Hang In There Mad Man!
Regards,
DOC Collins - Vietnam Dustoff Medic 1968-69
A;though I never saw combat duty, when I drive around in my electric wheelchair with my Navy flag flying high along with the US flag, I do get comments like,'Thank you for your service' My disability is due to a heredity factor but has really left me limited. When I get this response, my answer usually is,'Thank you for caring' and that is the best gratification I can get out of any comments. That usually puts a smile on both our faces and sometimes that all it takes to get me through a rough day.
DanCollins888

Bellevue, WA

#10 Aug 18, 2012
The Mad Man wrote:
<quoted text>
A;though I never saw combat duty, when I drive around in my electric wheelchair with my Navy flag flying high along with the US flag, I do get comments like,'Thank you for your service' My disability is due to a heredity factor but has really left me limited. When I get this response, my answer usually is,'Thank you for caring' and that is the best gratification I can get out of any comments. That usually puts a smile on both our faces and sometimes that all it takes to get me through a rough day.
Some people, I am sure have the best of intentions when they parrot the politically correct phrase "Thank you for your service."

Anyone who has served in the military had hardships "not known" to civilians. It takes a lot from us to leave civilian life, fight through basic training, advanced training, and tough duty assignments. Not every veteran has to have a service connected disability to deserve recognition, and our thanks for giving-up so much they could have enjoyed in civilian life.

For all the civilians and politically correct military personnel who so quickly and mindlessly "parrot" "Thank you for your service" it should be made clear the phrase is Liberal/Socialist and "originated" in Soviet Communist Russia during the "Great Patriotic War"__ WWII. "Thank you for your service" continues to be practiced in the Russian military today.

Liberal/Socialist continue to "program" our thought processes through "political correctness."

Today's PTSD programs are not as effective as they could be, because political correctness has taken "deep roots" in distorting psychology away from soldiers and veterans.

Blocking PTSD [specific] symptoms with medication is not therapy, it is not education toward recognizing, dealing with, and out-processing PTSD problems.

Medication is not the answer. Soldiers have a "discipline" lacking in civilians. Government needs to bury political correctness in PTSD therapy [provide down and dirty education] and remind these people they are soldiers, and they should act like soldiers [Veterans know __ "Once a soldier, always a soldier"].

PTSD is just another mission. Practice__practice__practice! Anger__rage for some insignificant displacement__should be ingrained through PTSD education__and practice to condition the soldier/veteran to pause and reflect "What am I really angry about?"

"What am I really angry about?" Through PTSD education and practice the soldier/veteran replays the past several days to locate an issue blocked and set aside [avoidance]. Odds are there was a specific trauma date blocked and avoided. Deal with it__embrace it__out-process it. Sounds easy, but it is not. Think again, was anything in your military life really easy? Military life was a series of "obstacles to be overcome"__so is PTSD.

Mad Man, I appreciate your being able to find the strength of character to reach out on Topix to assist other soldiers/veterans, and you willingness to express your own needs.

Hang In There Buddy!

Dan Collins - Fircrest
The Mad Man

Long Beach, CA

#11 Aug 19, 2012
'For all the civilians and politically correct military personnel who so quickly and mindlessly "parrot" "Thank you for your service" it should be made clear the phrase is Liberal/Socialist and "originated" in Soviet Communist Russia during the "Great Patriotic War"__ WWII. "Thank you for your service" continues to be practiced in the Russian military today.'
I had no idea. I do see your point and understand your ire. Shame we were duped into that phrase, I really thought it meant something but again we are dealing with the govt. Thanks for the education.
The Mad Man

Long Beach, CA

#12 Aug 19, 2012
HumanSpirit wrote:
psychiatry has No science, No medical model, No evidence based medicine and there is no test for chemical imbalance of the brain. The industry is based on fraud.
Death, violence and suscide from SSRI drugs
Soldier Cases
http://www.ssristories.com/index.php...
Public cases
Death, violence, erratic behavior and the suicide by mind drugs
http://ssristories.com/index.php
________
U.S. military: Heavily armed and medicated
Marine Corporal Michael Cataldi woke as he heard the truck rumble past.
He opened his eyes, but saw nothing. It was the middle of the night, and he was facedown in the sands of western Iraq. His loaded M16 was pinned beneath him.
Cataldi had no idea how he'd gotten to where he now lay, some 200 meters from the dilapidated building where his buddies slept. But he suspected what had caused this nightmare: His Klonopin prescription had run out.
His ordeal was not all that remarkable for a person on that anti-anxiety medication. In the lengthy labeling that accompanies each prescription, Klonopin users are warned against abruptly stopping the medicine, since doing so can cause psychosis, hallucinations, and other symptoms. What makes Cataldi's story extraordinary is that he was a U. S. Marine at war, and that the drug's adverse effects endangered lives his own, his fellow Marines', and the lives of any civilians unfortunate enough to cross his path.
"It put everyone within rifle distance at risk," he says.
In deploying an all-volunteer army to fight two ongoing wars, in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Pentagon has increasingly relied on prescription drugs to keep its warriors on the front lines. In recent years, the number of military prescriptions for antidepressants, sleeping pills, and painkillers has risen as soldiers come home with battered bodies and troubled minds. And many of those service members are then sent back to war theaters in distant lands with bottles of medication to fortify them.
According to data from a U. S. Army mental-health survey released last year, about 12 percent of soldiers in Iraq and 15 percent of those in Afghanistan reported taking antidepressants, anti-anxiety medications, or sleeping pills. Prescriptions for painkillers have also skyrocketed. Data from the Department of Defense last fall showed that as of September 2007, prescriptions for narcotics for active-duty troops had risen to almost 50,000 a month, compared with about 33,000 a month in October 2003, not long after the Iraq war began.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30748260/ns/healt...
Latest tag vets with other than honorable discharge are wearing...
"As he left the Army to re-enter the civilian world, Starks opted to wear a cap with a peculiar patch: "Warning, This Vet Is Medicated For Your Protection."
HumanSpirit

Alachua, FL

#13 Aug 19, 2012
VA Benefits like disability in the publuc sector at a time when the economy has been Republican crushed for the New World Order (since the 1980's) is not hard to understand the exceptance of the mental health illnesses in the public sector. There is no science to the mental health industry. No medical model. No evidence based medicine . No test for chemical imbalances of the brain. The APA admited in 2007 to the falsehood of the statement . The other medications being used to cotrol the society is the Statin drugs and loss of memory and other heath issues.

Soldier Cases

http://www.ssristories.com/index.php...

Public cases

Death, violence, erratic behavior and the suicide by mind drugs

http://ssristories.com/index.php
HumanSpirit

Alachua, FL

#14 Aug 19, 2012
U.S. military: Heavily armed and medicated

Marine Corporal Michael Cataldi woke as he heard the truck rumble past.

He opened his eyes, but saw nothing. It was the middle of the night, and he was facedown in the sands of western Iraq. His loaded M16 was pinned beneath him.

Cataldi had no idea how he'd gotten to where he now lay, some 200 meters from the dilapidated building where his buddies slept. But he suspected what had caused this nightmare: His Klonopin prescription had run out.

His ordeal was not all that remarkable for a person on that anti-anxiety medication. In the lengthy labeling that accompanies each prescription, Klonopin users are warned against abruptly stopping the medicine, since doing so can cause psychosis, hallucinations, and other symptoms. What makes Cataldi's story extraordinary is that he was a U. S. Marine at war, and that the drug's adverse effects endangered lives his own, his fellow Marines', and the lives of any civilians unfortunate enough to cross his path.

"It put everyone within rifle distance at risk," he says.

In deploying an all-volunteer army to fight two ongoing wars, in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Pentagon has increasingly relied on prescription drugs to keep its warriors on the front lines. In recent years, the number of military prescriptions for antidepressants, sleeping pills, and painkillers has risen as soldiers come home with battered bodies and troubled minds. And many of those service members are then sent back to war theaters in distant lands with bottles of medication to fortify them.

According to data from a U. S. Army mental-health survey released last year, about 12 percent of soldiers in Iraq and 15 percent of those in Afghanistan reported taking antidepressants, anti-anxiety medications, or sleeping pills. Prescriptions for painkillers have also skyrocketed. Data from the Department of Defense last fall showed that as of September 2007, prescriptions for narcotics for active-duty troops had risen to almost 50,000 a month, compared with about 33,000 a month in October 2003, not long after the Iraq war began.

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30748260/ns/healt...
HumanSpirit

Alachua, FL

#15 Aug 19, 2012
The (APA) DSM-V is the future version of the Mein Kampf.

Bombs and bullets will be replaced with mind drugs and psychotherapy (false memory) in future generations.

That's certainly what Aldus Huxley predicted with his fictional Soma and it came true
HumanSpirit

Alachua, FL

#16 Aug 19, 2012
Psychiatry: An industry of death

&fe ature=youtube_gdata_player

Psychiatry No Science

http://www.youtube.com/watch...

“Call sign: Apache One Six”

Since: Mar 11

US 62 @ US 81

#17 Aug 19, 2012
HumanSpirit wrote:
Psychiatry: An industry of death

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =FPUHUpfDVgYXX&feature=you tube_gdata_player

Psychiatry No Science

http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Wail hail. It must be true it is on youtube.

“GOVERNMENT OF DECEIVERS (GOD)”

Since: Sep 10

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY

#18 Aug 21, 2012
Coercion / Terrorism is being used to meet the National Goal. The American Way continues to be victimize or we will victimize you in the American Holocaust (It's not Genocide until you are a victim).

The American Holocaust uses Collusion by decisionmakers to not enforce the laws of the US Constitution to reach the national goals like those in Executive Order 12871 (USSC 99-565).

To understand the American Holocaust you must first resist your godass. Your godass prevents you from being fearless and intelligent. god being governing oppressive dis ease (mental illness) and ass being American Stockholm Syndrome (when you love your abuser even if they are killing you). The American Holocaust is the Jewish Holocaust except it is the Americans who are being killed. You wouldn't be an American would you? Congress and SCOTUS (US Supreme Court Justices) in collusion premeditated and orchestrated are not enforcing the laws of the US Constitution to aide in the reduction of the deficit (death fix it) and population. It's called torture (Economic Oppression). The elitist are getting rid of the undesirables. Taking out what they call the trash. You gets not even a slither of what they call the American pie. Instead you eat rhetoric in the form of lie, delay and deny until you and yours die.

Planned obsolescence:


Attacks on veterans ain't nothing new.

http://www.authorsden.com/visit/viewArticle.a...

"Yes they deserved to die and I hope they burn in hell!" is a quote from A Time to Kill (PRKD).

“Call sign: Apache One Six”

Since: Mar 11

US 62 @ US 81

#19 Aug 21, 2012
National Whistleblower wrote:
***Meaningless Rhetoric omitted***

Planned obsolescence: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =_3bNWtXhH8oXX
Attacks on veterans ain't nothing new.
http://www.authorsden.com/visit/viewArticle.a...
"Yes they deserved to die and I hope they burn in hell!" is a quote from A Time to Kill (PRKD).
It must be true it's on Youtube and some anonymous writers website. Some people will believe almost anything.

“GOVERNMENT OF DECEIVERS (GOD)”

Since: Sep 10

NEWARK, NEW JERSEY

#20 Aug 21, 2012
HumanSpirit wrote:
psychiatry has No science, No medical model, No evidence based medicine and there is no test for chemical imbalance of the brain. The industry is based on fraud.
Death, violence and suscide from SSRI drugs
Soldier Cases
http://www.ssristories.com/index.php...
Public cases
Death, violence, erratic behavior and the suicide by mind drugs
http://ssristories.com/index.php
________
U.S. military: Heavily armed and medicated
Marine Corporal Michael Cataldi woke as he heard the truck rumble past.
He opened his eyes, but saw nothing. It was the middle of the night, and he was facedown in the sands of western Iraq. His loaded M16 was pinned beneath him.
Cataldi had no idea how he'd gotten to where he now lay, some 200 meters from the dilapidated building where his buddies slept. But he suspected what had caused this nightmare: His Klonopin prescription had run out.
His ordeal was not all that remarkable for a person on that anti-anxiety medication. In the lengthy labeling that accompanies each prescription, Klonopin users are warned against abruptly stopping the medicine, since doing so can cause psychosis, hallucinations, and other symptoms. What makes Cataldi's story extraordinary is that he was a U. S. Marine at war, and that the drug's adverse effects endangered lives his own, his fellow Marines', and the lives of any civilians unfortunate enough to cross his path.
"It put everyone within rifle distance at risk," he says.
In deploying an all-volunteer army to fight two ongoing wars, in Iraq and Afghanistan, the Pentagon has increasingly relied on prescription drugs to keep its warriors on the front lines. In recent years, the number of military prescriptions for antidepressants, sleeping pills, and painkillers has risen as soldiers come home with battered bodies and troubled minds. And many of those service members are then sent back to war theaters in distant lands with bottles of medication to fortify them.
According to data from a U. S. Army mental-health survey released last year, about 12 percent of soldiers in Iraq and 15 percent of those in Afghanistan reported taking antidepressants, anti-anxiety medications, or sleeping pills. Prescriptions for painkillers have also skyrocketed. Data from the Department of Defense last fall showed that as of September 2007, prescriptions for narcotics for active-duty troops had risen to almost 50,000 a month, compared with about 33,000 a month in October 2003, not long after the Iraq war began.
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/30748260/ns/healt...
http://www.topix.com/forum/com /united-states-postal-service/ TJEPS8VN16ETHBASV

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