Choosing the right mental health professional can be a daunting task

Feb 11, 2013 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: Boston.com

Dedham mother remembers when her teenage daughter became overwhelmed with anxiety and was using illicit drugs.

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1 - 7 of 7 Comments Last updated Feb 13, 2013
HumanSpirit

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#1
Feb 13, 2013
 
Getting rid of the mental health worker with no science or evidence based medicine is the problem

Death, violence, erratic behavior and the suicide by mind drugs

http://ssristories.com/index.php

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Inside the Battle to Define Mental Illness

Every so often Al Frances says something that seems to surprise even him. Just now, for instance, in the predawn darkness of his comfortable, rambling home in Carmel, California, he has broken off his exercise routine to declare that “there is no definition of a mental disorder. It’s bullshit. I mean, you just can’t define it.” Then an odd, reflective look crosses his face, as if he’s taking in the strangeness of this scene: Allen Frances, lead editor of the fourth edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (universally known as the DSM-IV), the guy who wrote the book on mental illness, confessing that “these concepts are virtually impossible to define precisely with bright lines at the boundaries.” For the first time in two days, the conversation comes to an awkward halt.

Pasted from < http://www.wired.com/magazine/2010/12/ff_dsmv... ;

There are no genetic tests, no brain scans, blood tests, chemical imbalance tests or X-rays that can scientifically/medically prove that any psychiatric disorder is a medical condition.
HumanSpirit

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#2
Feb 13, 2013
 
Psychiatric Diagnosis: Too Little Science, Too Many Conflicts of Interest [i]

Paula J. Caplan, Ph.D.

Harvard University

Snip:

The Concerns

There is a lot of pain and suffering in the world, and it is tempting to believe that the mental health community knows how to help. It is widely believed, both by mental health professionals and the general population, that if only a person gets the right psychiatric diagnosis, the therapist will know what kind of measures will be the most helpful. Unfortunately, that is not usually the case, and getting a psychiatric diagnosis can often create more problems than it solves, including a lifetime of being labeled, difficulties with obtaining affordable (or any) health insurance (due to now having a pre-existing condition), loss of employment, loss of child custody, the overlooking of physical illnesses and injuries because of everything being attributed to psychological factors, and the loss of the right to make decisions about one’s medical and legal affairs. The creation and use of psychiatric diagnosis, unlike, for instance, psychiatric drugs, is not overseen by any regulatory body, and rarely does anyone raise the question of what role the assignment of a psychiatric label has played in creating problems for individuals.[ii]

The Problematic History

These serious limitations have not prevented the authors of the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), sometimes known as “the therapist’s Bible,” from making expansive claims about their knowledge and authority and wielding enormous power to decide who will and will not be called mentally ill and what the varieties of alleged mental illness will be. The DSM’s current edition is called DSM-IV-TR, and it was preceded by the original DSM (in 1952), then DSM-II (1968), DSM-III (1980), DSM-III-R (Third Edition Revised)(1987), DSM-IV (1994), and DSM-IV-TR (2000). The DSM-V is currently in preparation and slated for 2013 publication. Each time a new edition appears, the media ask whichever psychiatrist is the lead editor why a new edition was necessary, and like clockwork, each editor replies that it was because the previous edition really wasn’t scientific (Caplan, 1995). And each time a new edition appears, it contains many more categories than does the previous one. For instance, DSM-III-R contained 297 categories, and DSM-IV contained 374 (Caplan, 1995).

I served as an advisor to two of the DSM-IV committees, before resigning due to serious concerns after witnessing how fast and loose they play with the scientific research related to diagnosis (Caplan, 1995). The DSM is widely used, not only in the mental health system, but also in general medical practice, in schools, and in the courts. I have been involved since 1985 in trying to alert both therapists and the public to the manual’s unscientific nature and the dangers that believing in its objectivity poses. Since then, I have watched with interest a national trend toward gradually increasing openness to the idea that psychiatric diagnosis (A)is largely unscientific,(B)is highly subjective and political, and (C)can cause untold harm, ranging from the patients’ lowered self-confidence to loss of custody of children to loss of health insurance (because any psychiatric label can be considered evidence of a pre-existing condition) to loss of the right to make decisions about their medical and legal affairs.

More of this article:

http://awpsych.org/index.php...
HumanSpirit

High Springs, FL

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#3
Feb 13, 2013
 
Here is the agenda of the Mental Health in the take over of the Judiciary Branch of government (by state) on the problem the industry caused in the USA.(Drug America) This is a similar takeover to what happen in the Public School System.

Mental Health Courts State Links

Mental Health Court by links

http://www.ncsc.org/topics/problem-solving-co...

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Cartoon: Psychiatry / Court/ puppet

http://familyrights.us/images/psychs_shred_ri...
HumanSpirit

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#4
Feb 13, 2013
 
The (APA) DSM-V is the future version of the Mein Kampf.

Bombs and bullets will be replaced with mind drugs and psychotherapy (false memory) in future generations.

That's certainly what Aldus Huxley predicted with his fictional Soma and it came true
HumanSpirit

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#5
Feb 13, 2013
 
Psychiatry: An industry of death

&fe ature=youtube_gdata_player

Psychiatry No Science

http://www.youtube.com/watch...
HumanSpirit

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#6
Feb 13, 2013
 
The Hidden Side of Psychiatry by Gary Null

http://www.sntp.net/null1.htm
HumanSpirit

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#7
Feb 13, 2013
 
Psychiatrists Becoming Doctor Joke_----_

There may actually be some good news coming out of academia.“This really is a profession that has run amok,” Robert Whitaker, author of Anatomy of an Epidemic said of psychiatrists in a recent interview with Celeste McGovern which appeared in Citizen magazine.“People are beginning to question its legitimacy and they are beginning to mistrust its values, its diagnoses and its treatments.”
McGovern writes that,“Even medical students are avoiding it, he adds, as the average age of psychiatrists is now 57.” Citizen is published by Focus on the Family. McGovern is based in the United Kingdom.

“Every day in the United States, 850 adults and 250 children are added to the federal government’s disability benefit rolls because of mental illness,” McGovern reports.“That means about 400,000 people are incapacitated each year, to say nothing of hundreds of thousands more diagnosed with less-crippling psychiatric illnesses.”

“The alarming growth rate of this phenomenon is reflected in American spending on psychiatric drugs: Between 1985 and 2007, spending on antidepressants and anti-psychotics alone multiplied nearly 50 times, from $503 million to more than $24 billion annually.”

Part of this trend is catalogued in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental illness 5, compiled by the American Psychiatric Association.“Its current version, the DSM-IV, last updated in 1994, defines 297 disorders based on diagnostic checklists of symptoms,” McGovern relates.“A diagnosis of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), for example, is given if clinicians can tick off six of a list of symptoms, including ‘not listening,’‘fidgeting’ and ‘losing things.’”
“Today, at least 3 million American children are taking amphetamine drugs like Ritalin as a result of ADHD diagnoses.” The links between psychiatry and pharmaceuticals go deeper than is usually reported, McGovern shows.

“Far from being an isolated case, a study from University of Massachusetts-Boston found that 70 percent of the psychiatrists working on the DSM-5 revision have financial ties to the industry,” McGovern relates.

Stuart Kirk, professor emeritus of social welfare at UCLA told McGovern that “Big Pharma has bought the profession of psychiatry, at least it’s leadership cadre.” Kirk is the author of the forthcoming book, Mad Science: The Disorders of American Psychiatry.

Malcolm A. Kline is the Executive Director of Accuracy in Academia.
I

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