Ruben Rosario: Dying children need ho...

Ruben Rosario: Dying children need hospice, too. Let's build one.

There are 48 comments on the TwinCities.com story from Mar 9, 2011, titled Ruben Rosario: Dying children need hospice, too. Let's build one.. In it, TwinCities.com reports that:

Maryah Tift, 16, of Cottage Grove didn t want to die in a hospital or at home as her long struggle with cancer came to an end last May.

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“"Molon Labe"”

Since: Oct 09

North Afghanistan

#2 Mar 9, 2011
Rueben....Im marking this day on the calendar.

For once, I am in complete agreement with you.
Ive Got An Idea

Elko, MN

#3 Mar 10, 2011
Unfortunately, our politicians are trying to get a certain football team a new stadium built to play their meaningless little games. That's our tax dollars hard at work. Maybe if guys like Bill Gates and his circle of billionaires who want to leave at least half of their endless supply of money to charity would step up to the plate and get hospices like this going, poor souls like Maryah would get their last wishes fulfilled.
ding ding buddy

Minneapolis, MN

#4 Mar 10, 2011
Ive Got An Idea wrote:
Unfortunately, our politicians are trying to get a certain football team a new stadium built to play their meaningless little games. That's our tax dollars hard at work. Maybe if guys like Bill Gates and his circle of billionaires who want to leave at least half of their endless supply of money to charity would step up to the plate and get hospices like this going, poor souls like Maryah would get their last wishes fulfilled.
much more important to have light rail 1% of the population might use.
tunafreedolphin

San Jose, CA

#5 Mar 10, 2011
We're not lagging the rest of the world. In-home hospice is by far, the best alternative. We have more of it than other countries because thankfully, our health-care providers cover it. My father had in home hospice and it was wonderful. I can't imagine a lonelier place go if you were dying than anywhere but home. Hospice homes are great, and God bless those people who run them and care for the dying. But there's no place like home. And I think that viewing the fact that we don't have more hospice homes than other countries as though it were a problem misses a very positive point about what we DO have. That is more in-home hospice, and coverage for it, than other, less fortunate countries with poorer health-care services. But I say it's great to build them and have them available for those not fortunate enough to live their last days at home.
Mark

Saint Paul, MN

#6 Mar 10, 2011
Why is it that when Rosario is doing his usual act (shilling for his leftist paymasters at the pioneer press) you can't comment on his articles, but you can comment on the "help the kids" one?

“Freedom and responsibility”

Since: Dec 10

St. Paul

#7 Mar 10, 2011
Ruben goes through another box of kleenex wondering why the taxpayer doesn't pick up another cost. Shock for senor Ruben: The more poor people we have in the country, the harder it gets to care for our poor people. Pretty simple stuff. The next time he whines away about insufficient social programs, he should think about the rest of his articles which endlessly defend mass importation of poor people.
Yabetcha

Saint Paul, MN

#8 Mar 10, 2011
Path of Reason wrote:
Ruben goes through another box of kleenex wondering why the taxpayer doesn't pick up another cost. Shock for senor Ruben: The more poor people we have in the country, the harder it gets to care for our poor people. Pretty simple stuff. The next time he whines away about insufficient social programs, he should think about the rest of his articles which endlessly defend mass importation of poor people.
Nice one, Pathie. I knew it was only a matter of time. Look everyone, a peckerwood on parade.
JAdams

Minneapolis, MN

#9 Mar 10, 2011
Hey Rosario, here's a chance to do something with your life other than be a mouthpiece for Marxists. Go ahead and put a foundation together and get one built.
Laura

Minneapolis, MN

#10 Mar 10, 2011
Thank you for sharing this story. Please keep your readers updated on how we can help.
g-del

Saint Paul, MN

#11 Mar 10, 2011
hey ruby how about some stories on social justice for the working slumps who support 35% of those who dont work-- you could have bleeding heart story after story about all the thing you social engineers want --just if you quit supporting the things you socialist think your entitle to like--light rail - stadiums-hockey arena- dog parks- bike trails - walking paths-endless school progrrams etc.--------plus bleeding heart stories about how my family lifestyle goes down the tube to make my neighbors better--
Think about it

Hastings, MN

#12 Mar 10, 2011
tunafreedolphin wrote:
We're not lagging the rest of the world. In-home hospice is by far, the best alternative. We have more of it than other countries because thankfully, our health-care providers cover it. My father had in home hospice and it was wonderful. I can't imagine a lonelier place go if you were dying than anywhere but home. Hospice homes are great, and God bless those people who run them and care for the dying. But there's no place like home. And I think that viewing the fact that we don't have more hospice homes than other countries as though it were a problem misses a very positive point about what we DO have. That is more in-home hospice, and coverage for it, than other, less fortunate countries with poorer health-care services. But I say it's great to build them and have them available for those not fortunate enough to live their last days at home.
Did you read the article? The 16 year old in the story did not want to die at home for fear of traumatizing her younger siblings. Some people just don't want to die at home. Who are we to say what is best for everyone?
Rachel Perez

United States

#13 Mar 10, 2011
Not a picture of Maryah above but great article and great picture!:)
Elroy blues

Eau Claire, WI

#14 Mar 10, 2011
Finally, something we can agree on, it cost my brother thousands of dollars to keep his dying son home because there was no outlet to help him. because of all the uncovered medical costs he had to file for hardship bankruptcy.
Rebellion

Minneapolis, MN

#16 Mar 10, 2011
Wrongly judged wrote:
I feel for the children and it saddens me to see them suffer.. But, Rachel Perez let me go because of a medical allergic reaction I had to a medication my doctor gave me. So I feel no sympathy for her at all....For the child yes..........So she is 2 faced when feeling for people that have a medical issue.. It is hard for me to feel bad for someone, when she persecuted me because of an illness.
Get over yourself. Have you ever had to watch your child die? a medical allergic reaction and/or being fired for it (I am sure there is more to the story), is much less traumatic than losing your child. It takes years to recover mentally from the loss of a child. you can get another job - she can't replace her child. You need to get a grip.

Since: Mar 08

St. Paul, MN

#17 Mar 10, 2011
tunafreedolphin wrote:
We're not lagging the rest of the world. In-home hospice is by far, the best alternative. We have more of it than other countries because thankfully, our health-care providers cover it. My father had in home hospice and it was wonderful. I can't imagine a lonelier place go if you were dying than anywhere but home. Hospice homes are great, and God bless those people who run them and care for the dying. But there's no place like home. And I think that viewing the fact that we don't have more hospice homes than other countries as though it were a problem misses a very positive point about what we DO have. That is more in-home hospice, and coverage for it, than other, less fortunate countries with poorer health-care services. But I say it's great to build them and have them available for those not fortunate enough to live their last days at home.
Children, just like adults, should have a choice. Your father got to choose to die at home with in home hospice. Because these facilities don't exist for children, they don't have the option. It's not about not being fortunate enough to die at home. I'm glad your father's experience was wonderful, and I'm very sorry for your loss. However, home is not always the best place to die. Hospice facilities are available for adults - so obviously not everyone wants to die at home. Children are no different.
Really

Cottage Grove, MN

#18 Mar 10, 2011
Wrongly judged wrote:
I feel for the children and it saddens me to see them suffer.. But, Rachel Perez let me go because of a medical allergic reaction I had to a medication my doctor gave me. So I feel no sympathy for her at all....For the child yes..........So she is 2 faced when feeling for people that have a medical issue.. It is hard for me to feel bad for someone, when she persecuted me because of an illness.
This has nothing to do with Rachel's work!! This is all about the need for a Children's Hospice in the state of MN. And because of Maryah's story and the numerous lives she touched, many people are donating to make the Children's Hospice Home a reality. And to say that you don't have sympathy for Rachel, WOW!!
tunafreedolphin

San Jose, CA

#19 Mar 10, 2011
Think about it wrote:
<quoted text>
Did you read the article? The 16 year old in the story did not want to die at home for fear of traumatizing her younger siblings. Some people just don't want to die at home. Who are we to say what is best for everyone?
I think it's safe bet that the overwhelming majority of those asked would much prefer to spend their last days and hours in familiar surroundings. Not only did my own father have in-home hospice, but my father-in-law died in a hospice house, but was moved there only after the siblings couldn't provide around the clock care. Had we been able to afford it, it would have been a no brainer to let him stay home. My guess is that if you took a poll this would be most people's choice.
Rebellion

Minneapolis, MN

#20 Mar 10, 2011
tunafreedolphin wrote:
<quoted text>
I think it's safe bet that the overwhelming majority of those asked would much prefer to spend their last days and hours in familiar surroundings. Not only did my own father have in-home hospice, but my father-in-law died in a hospice house, but was moved there only after the siblings couldn't provide around the clock care. Had we been able to afford it, it would have been a no brainer to let him stay home. My guess is that if you took a poll this would be most people's choice.
If the "overwhelming majority" wanted to spend their last days at home - why are there so many hospices and senior care centers around? Because although they might want something - their family may not be able (and in some cases) willing to provide it and need others to do so. Hospices exist because sometimes, family can't provide adequate care for their loved one. Why should your children have fewer choices than your parents do?
WOW

Minneapolis, MN

#22 Mar 10, 2011
Wrongly judged wrote:
I feel for the children and it saddens me to see them suffer.. But, Rachel Perez let me go because of a medical allergic reaction I had to a medication my doctor gave me. So I feel no sympathy for her at all....For the child yes..........So she is 2 faced when feeling for people that have a medical issue.. It is hard for me to feel bad for someone, when she persecuted me because of an illness.
Wow! That's all I've got to say to that. This article had absolutely nothing to do with you or Rachel for that matter. The Perez/Tift family was mentioned because of their support for a very worthy cause that is dearly needed. Maryah was an amazing young woman and is dearly missed. Yes it was Maryah's wish to have a place like this to go, and it is now up to her friends and family to help bring this to fruition for other children like Maryah.

Shame on you for thinking that this is an appropriate place to air your grievences with your former employer. Very classy! If you did in fact know Maryah, it is clearly apparant that her grace didn't rub off on you!!
Confusing

Minneapolis, MN

#23 Mar 10, 2011
Hospice is a "care concept" not a place. Hospice can take place anywhere including special facilities that are designed to care specifically to the special needs of people who are dying, called inpatient hospice. This article is talking about the need for inpatient hospice for children in MN. We are blessed in this community to have some really good hospice services for children from before birth through childhood. For more information, try a Google search "what is hospice" or see this Children's Hospital page: http://www.childrensmn.org/Services/PainPalli...

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