Woman repays hospice with $5 million ...

Woman repays hospice with $5 million bequest | The Columbus Dispatch

There are 17 comments on the Columbus Dispatch story from Dec 10, 2010, titled Woman repays hospice with $5 million bequest | The Columbus Dispatch. In it, Columbus Dispatch reports that:

In 1993, Vera K. Randall made her first donation to the OhioHealth Foundation: $15. In the ensuing years, the former English teacher at Upper Arlington High School continued to contribute modest amounts to the philanthropic arm of the nonprofit hospital chain, later telling an employee that she'd one day leave it "a good, tidy sum." No one could ...

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Another Concerned Citizen

Columbus, OH

#1 Dec 10, 2010
Five million is a lot of money, but her greatest contribution was in the lives of her students.
ABC

Columbus, OH

#2 Dec 10, 2010
My mother was only in hospice care for a few hours but I will always be grateful for what they did and how they operated. They are a great organization.
chakes

United States

#3 Dec 10, 2010
now that is class !
Balls Deep

Grove City, OH

#4 Dec 10, 2010
Kudos. Some people know how to go out with a bang (in a good way) and she was one of them.
WOW

Columbus, OH

#6 Dec 10, 2010
It is so good to read about something "wonderful" happening !
wrong

United States

#7 Dec 10, 2010
she leave any of her 'friends' any money. give to pepole that can use it. not some company that has plenty! she had twisted ideas of how to spread the wealth.

“Time traveler”

Since: Apr 10

At large

#8 Dec 10, 2010
wrong wrote:
she leave any of her 'friends' any money. give to pepole that can use it. not some company that has plenty! she had twisted ideas of how to spread the wealth.
You sound a little twisted, maybe you are sore that she didn't give you some?
Jim

Hilliard, OH

#9 Dec 10, 2010
wrong wrote:
she leave any of her 'friends' any money. give to pepole that can use it. not some company that has plenty! she had twisted ideas of how to spread the wealth.
I'm surprised that you didn't bash Teacher's Unions and the Pension fund. Anyway, this was a nice gesture on her behalf. Those patients and their families will be most appreciative. Ohio Health does charge out the ying yang for services to Medicare for Hospice. That also leaves the families with a ton of final expenses, hopefully this gift can be used to help offset some of those.
red126

Fostoria, OH

#11 Dec 10, 2010
GOD BLESS HER!!! My mother was in hospice care at Kobacker House from July 11-July 16 2010. She passed away at Koback on July 16, 2010 from terminal cancer. The staff at Kobacker was great in making her and all of us(her family)feel comfortable. I would especially like to thank nurse Linda and Pastor Jackie for everything they did for all of us and especially for my mom. I wish I had money to donate to them. THANK YOU!

Mom I love you and carry your memory with me everyday, we'll see you in Heaven when it our turn.
Linda

Galloway, OH

#12 Dec 10, 2010
How does a "poor school teacher" have this kind of money?
Just Think About It

Pickerington, OH

#13 Dec 10, 2010
Linda wrote:
How does a "poor school teacher" have this kind of money?
Good investment advice, I suspect. Maybe even lottery winnings. There are a lot of ways she and her sister could have built up their funds, but what really matters is what they did with them in the end. Good for them!
Nunya Bizniss

Blacklick, OH

#14 Dec 10, 2010
Medicare has set daily fees for hospice reimbursment. They cannot "charge" any more than that, and if a person needs more, it comes from the donation fund to cover these additional expenses. Final expenses are not even part of it.
Beowulf

Columbus, OH

#15 Dec 10, 2010
Linda wrote:
How does a "poor school teacher" have this kind of money?
"The $5 million gift, he said, represents an inheritance the siblings shared. Neither Yearling nor Gleason could elaborate on the source of the family's wealth."

Linda, please READ when you read an article. It's right there, as noted by the quote I copied and pasted.
Concerned

Columbus, OH

#16 Dec 11, 2010
ABC wrote:
My mother was only in hospice care for a few hours but I will always be grateful for what they did and how they operated. They are a great organization.
I was just thinking same. We brought Mom home to her own little bed at 4:20 pm. The hospice lady was not "supposed" to arrive until the next morning. By 6:20, Mom had passed. The lady who arrived unexpectedly, sat at the kitchen table and did every necessary there was to do. I had to do nothing but talk to my mom, console my dad & celebrate the life of my mother with all our family who were with her. Mom's last words: "I'm going home!" I agree with you. In the very short time the hospice lady was with us for my mom, she was family & her presence will always be appreciated.
Concerned

Columbus, OH

#17 Dec 11, 2010
Just Think About It wrote:
<quoted text>
Good investment advice, I suspect. Maybe even lottery winnings. There are a lot of ways she and her sister could have built up their funds, but what really matters is what they did with them in the end. Good for them!
She wasn't married. She didn't have children & grandchildren with their hands out asking to borrow from her! She must have had friends who wanted more for her than from her. &#9829;
CarolD

Columbus, OH

#18 Dec 11, 2010
I too have dealt with hospice with a relative and they were wonderful, not only to the patient but to the family as well. What a decent and dignified wonderful way to go and treated with the kindness of people who understand what everyone is going through. I wish I had $5M to give too!

Since: Jul 11

Commerce City

#19 Jul 16, 2011
Although the money was a wonderful gift, she gave an even more important one in the awareness of hospice she brought about.

In researching my book, possibly to be named, Dying To Be There, I have found that as the comments here show, people who know hospice are very passionate about it. It is the people who do not know what hospice is that need to be reached.

One study found that the majority of people do not even know what palliative care is. Once they do, they feel it should be available to everyone who would want it.

I am a hospice nurse and even for me, it has been a life changing experience. Before becoming a part of hospice, I only knew the misconceptions and not the truth about what hospice is and does.

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