Prostate Cancer Treated With High Dos...

Prostate Cancer Treated With High Dose Radioactive Pellets

There are 2 comments on the MediLexicon story from Feb 25, 2013, titled Prostate Cancer Treated With High Dose Radioactive Pellets. In it, MediLexicon reports that:

A new form of radiotherapy to treat prostate cancer is being used by doctors in Southampton, UK.

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Since: Dec 05

Reading, PA

#1 Feb 25, 2013
The other side of HDR brachytherapy treatment for prostate cancer

Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) after being treated with permanent radiation seed implants (brachytherapy). Treatment-related MDS or secondary MDS is often more severe and difficult to treat than de novo MDS (unknown changes to the bone marrow).

Myelodysplasia is a disease of the bone marrow cells where they become dysfunctional. The early stem cells don’t make enough red cell, white cells and platelets. When they look at the bone marrow cells, they would see enough of these early cells. They would look peculiar. They would be misshapen or too big or the nuclei of the cells would be too big.

Sometimes pathologists would diagnose the disease from the appearance of cells called megakaryocytes. MDS is characterized by an excess of blasts in the bone marrow 5-20%. The only difference between MDS and leukemia is that the term "leukemia" is only used when the number of blasts reaches 20% or more.

When patients die from this, it is usually because they can’t make enough infection fighting cells and get overwhelming infections such as pneumonia. Or, they develop acute leukemia. This type of leukemia that develops in people with myelodysplasia is virtually untreatable – different from other kinds of leukemia.

And generally older patients can’t handle aggressive treatment or the stress of not enough blood cells. For younger patients, the best hope is a stem cell transplant from someone else's bone marrow. But aside from transplant, there are no magic bullets. It is a bad disease that affects mainly older patients and those that have received anti-cancer treatment.

Urologists can hardly hold themselves back and are out with all sorts of treatments. Sometimes, while a life may be saved, a life may be taken.
Fredi

Tirana, Albania

#2 Mar 3, 2013
Although effective, they still remain chemotherapy, Are they worthy options?

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