Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Administration Prolongs Survival F...

Full story: Medical News Today

Category: Cancer/Oncology News Article Date: 05 Jan 2006 - 13pm A study featured in this month's edition of Gynecologic Oncology examines the challenges associated with the administration of intra-abdominal ...

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gdpawel

Philadelphia, PA

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#1
Mar 20, 2006
 
Right Therapy, Wrong Drugs?

Ovarian cancer patients are now living longer than they did in the past, but this is almost certainly owing to better and more aggressive surgery. This study could be an indication of the right chemotherapy, but using the wrong drugs.

The hallmark of cancer is heterogeneity. Not just many types of cancer (ovarian, breast, lung, colon, etc.), but many subtypes of cancer within a given type. Many types of ovarian cancer. Many types of breast cancer. Many types of lung cancer, etc. The biologies are very different and the response to given drugs is very different.

The hallmark of cancer treatment is heterogeneity. There are currently over 100 FDA approved cancer drugs, with hundreds more in the pipeline. All of these drugs tend to be partially effective, and even then, in only a minority of cases, and often for only a short duration of time.

The single most neglected area of cancer research has been the development of methods and technologies to be "matchmakers" between individual cancer with individual cancer treatment.

The single most neglected area of cancer treatment has been the unwillingness to utilize, or even study, the matchmaker technologies which have already been developed and which are already available. These technologies involve studies of cancer cell responses to drug exposure in cell culture systems, "outside" of the patient's body, before they are put "into" the patient's body.

With only 42% of the women being able to finished the rather arduous trial, perhaps abdominal chemo is the right therapy, but they were using the wrong drugs? All the more reason to "Test The Tumor First."
gdpawel

Philadelphia, PA

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#2
May 24, 2006
 
Molecular vs Cellular Profiling

Over the past few years, gene expression profiling has been suggested as the best or only way of determining ex vivo drug sensitivity. However, the clinical applicaton of these DNA content assays have been shown to correlate only with response and not survival. And due to almost all patients being treated with combination chemotherapy, this methodology cannot even be calibrated without the use of Cell Culture Drug Resistance Testing (CCDRT). CCDRTs can actually integrate all the gene expression into one convenient test result.

In obtaining information from gene mutations (DNA content assays) and/or gene expression (RNA content) it must be realized that DNA structure is only important insofar as it predicts for RNA content, which is only important insofar as it predicts for protein content, which is only important insofar as it predicts for protein function, which is important only insofar as it predicts for cell response, which is only important insofar as it predicts for tumor response and function. In other words, it correlates only with response and not survival, in entirely retrospective (not prospective) studies.

What are the data supporting the use of testing DNA, RNA and Protein expression? Two retrospective studies from two Harvard-affiliated hospitals, showing response, but not survival advantages, with a grand total of twenty six correlations. And a subsequent study, presented in the July 14, 2005 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine from another laboratory that did not show correlations between gene mutations and patient survival (Volume 353:133-144 Number 2).

There is cellular profiling (Cell Function Analysis) that shows data indicating a near doubling in the survival of patients with platinum resistant ovarian cancer, striking correlations between platinum activity and patient survival in previously-untreated ovarian cancer, and a comprehensive meta-analysis of scores of studies reporting response and survival correlations in thousands of patients.

Not only is cellular profiling a very important predictive test, but it is a unique tool for identifying newer, better drugs, testing drug combinations, and serving as a "gold standard" to develop new DNA, RNA, and protein-based tests of drug activity.

Source: Human Tumor Assay Journal
zooooooooooom

Poland

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#3
Feb 1, 2012
 
In obtaining information from gene mutations (DNA content assays) and/or gene expression (RNA content) it must be realized that DNA structure is only important insofar as it predicts for RNA content, which is only important insofar as it predicts for protein content, which is only important insofar as it predicts for protein function, which is important only insofar as it predicts for cell response, which is only important insofar as it predicts for tumor response and function. In other words, it correlates only with response and not survival, in entirely retrospective (not prospective) studies.

What are the data supporting the use of testing DNA, RNA and Protein expression? Two retrospective studies from two Harvard-affiliated hospitals, showing response, but not survival advantages, with a grand total of twenty six correlations. And a subsequent study, presented in the July 14, 2005 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine from another laboratory that did not show correlations between gene mutations and patient survival (Volume 353:133-144 Number 2).

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