Match Day: Medical students learn res...

Match Day: Medical students learn residency assignments

There are 13 comments on the El Paso Times story from Mar 17, 2011, titled Match Day: Medical students learn residency assignments. In it, El Paso Times reports that:

Texas Tech medical student Claire Sellers, left, spoke on her mobile phone while she and boyfriend Christopher Stowe read her match letter during Match Day at the Paul Foster School of Medicine Thursday.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at El Paso Times.

MadMax

Irving, TX

#1 Mar 17, 2011
Congrats to all the students. Wasn't the idea for the medical school was for the students to stay in El Paso? I guess that was in theory only cuz the reality is different.
SCR

El Paso, TX

#2 Mar 17, 2011
MadMax, you clearly do not understand how medical school and residency placement works. However, the school's presence alone has already brought health experts to our city and has contributed to the growing medical industry, which has already brought along high-paying jobs. Don't fret.
SCR

El Paso, TX

#3 Mar 17, 2011
By the way, congrats to the students!
Harvard Med

El Paso, TX

#4 Mar 17, 2011
This school (and many other things) is definitely what the city of El Paso needs. It's a good thing Paul L. Foster donated that money, Texas government wouldn't have.

Congratulations Tech students! May your hard work keep rewarding you in the future!
El Paso Native

El Paso, TX

#5 Mar 17, 2011
Congratulations and hope you come back to set up your medical practices here in the Sun City!
David Lopez

Albuquerque, NM

#6 Mar 17, 2011
I have to agree and disagree with both of you. Yes, I think the medical school is a good thing for El Paso in general, but I agree with MadMax that once these students leave elsewhere, they will be tempted to stay in other more lucrative and progressive cities, where there is more money to make, along with paying less for malpractice insurance(El Paso is very high). You have to understand that a high percentage of patients here are either Medicare and Medicaid insured or have no medical insurance at all and that is not enticing to medical professional. Doctors prefer good, private insurance that pay better and with less government intrusion that tells them how to practice. Also, since the first medical class was selected, I was a bit let down that they didn't select more students from the El Paso/southern New Mexico area, which I think would have increased our chances of keeping these young doctors here. But, no, a lot of these students are from other parts of the country, so chances are they won't stay here to practice, at least not for very long. And yes, I know, the selection committee will argue that those with the best qualifications are the ones selected, but still that may go against us. In other words, good for these medical students, but bad for us. I would be curious to see in 5, 10, 15, 20 years from now how many of these medical students actually are practicing here.
Ignorance is Rampant

San Antonio, TX

#7 Mar 17, 2011
David Lopez wrote:
Doctors prefer good, private insurance that pay better and with less government intrusion that tells them how to practice.
Actually, private insurance companies follow Medicare guidelines very closely. If Medicare doesn't allow it, neither do they. If Medicare mandates it, so do they.

As for the government telling doctor's how to practice, private insurance companies have been doing that for years. Ever hear of denials? I worked for a very large insurance company and my job was to make sure that whatever procedures doctors ordered met THE INSURANCE COMPANY'S guidelines of medical necessity. Doctor's had to show "proof" that a procedure, treatment, medication, etc. met the criteria for approval of payment. Payment would be either held or denied even if in your physician's professional opinion a certain procedure was in your best interest and necessary. In other words, just because your physician orders an MRI, doesn't mean your insurance company is going to pay for it. Your doctor better have his notes and examination done correctly and ready for an insurance company beancounter to scrutinize BEFORE you have your procedure.

Healthcare in this country is profit-driven. Insurance companies want to minimize payouts in order to increase the bottom line which translates into bigger bonuses for senior management. Now isn't that what healthcare is all about?
David Lopez

Albuquerque, NM

#8 Mar 17, 2011
I'm sorry, but Medicare and Medicaid are more intrusive than private insurances because of greater regulation. I'm not saying private insurances are perfect, certainly not in fact some are aweful, but I would say that most doctors prefer "good" private insurances vs government insurances. It's a case of the lesser of two evils. Bottom line: "Good" private insurances pay out more than medicare and medicaid, with less red tape. Why do you think a lot of doctors stop seeing these types of patients.
Comment

Albuquerque, NM

#9 Mar 17, 2011
Good luck to the students.
Residency

El Paso, TX

#10 Mar 17, 2011
SCR wrote:
MadMax, you clearly do not understand how medical school and residency placement works. However, the school's presence alone has already brought health experts to our city and has contributed to the growing medical industry, which has already brought along high-paying jobs. Don't fret.
You are the one that doesn't understand how medical school and residency works. Since I have completed all three - Medical School, Residency, and Fellowship, I am obligated to correct yet another El Pasoan who has drunk and is drinking the Paul F. Foster and UMC Kool-Aid. Those who can do - those who can't teach - and those who can do neither of these are actively recruited and retained by Texas Tech. The only criterion medical students use to determine their future residency program is the quantity and quality of the interns, residents, fellows and faculty that have been teaching them classroom and clinical medicine. They have had to endure what Texas Tech calls "Medical Education" for four years - and their decision to go elsewhere is the only criteria you need to look at to determine the quality of this "Medical School". The fact that only 2 medical students have chosen to stay in El Paso is not only pathetic - it is criminal! Perhaps someday both the print and television "media" in El Paso will take the time and effort required to investigate the percentage of Medical Students graduating from the University of Texas System who stay at their graduating institution. I'm not suggesting that you look at Ivy League institutions or even Baylor in Texas - the results would be shocking. A total examination of Texas Tech Medical School from President to "Deans" to "Teaching Faculty" is in order. Texas Tech at El Paso has done a very good job providing residency training for Foreign Medical Graduates and unless the leadership of this institution changes - that's all this "Medical School" will be good for - for many years to come.
David Lopez

Albuquerque, NM

#11 Mar 17, 2011
Residency, thank you for confirming my comments.
Comment

Albuquerque, NM

#12 Mar 17, 2011
Go Miners!
Ignorance is Rampant

San Antonio, TX

#13 Mar 20, 2011
David Lopez wrote:
I'm sorry, but Medicare and Medicaid are more intrusive than private insurances because of greater regulation. I'm not saying private insurances are perfect, certainly not in fact some are aweful, but I would say that most doctors prefer "good" private insurances vs government insurances. It's a case of the lesser of two evils. Bottom line: "Good" private insurances pay out more than medicare and medicaid, with less red tape. Why do you think a lot of doctors stop seeing these types of patients.
My friend, you are certainly entitled to your opinions, but the facts are the facts.

The New England Journal of Medicine conducted a study showing that an over-whelming majority (over 73%) of physicians prefer a single payer system (Medicare) over private insurance.

A Robert Wood Johnson Foundation study concluded that physicians prefer Medicare over private insurance because of Medicare's transparency, less paperwork, and ease of reimbursement.

"Physicians for a National Health Program" is an 18,000 member national physician's organization with its sole mission being advocating for a single-payer system in the U.S.

But what do I know? I've only been working in the medical field for 25 years as a Registered Nurse, clinic manager/administrator where we saw 100 patients/day, occupational health nurse where I was responsible for over 2,500 employees, working in several very busy emergency rooms, and on several different hospital units. I also studied business at one of the most prestigious business schools in the country.

Facts trump opinions.

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