UCLA Medical ranked in top three U.S. hospitals

Full story: LA Daily News 9
UCLA Medical Center was ranked as one of the top three American hospitals -- and the best hospital in the western United States for the 19th consecutive year -- in an annual U.S. News & World Report survey ... Full Story
Rob7333

Los Angeles, CA

#1 Jul 11, 2008
I spent a lot of time in the Oncology ward at UCLA Medical Center in Westwood. My son had terminal cancer. I realize they have moved to a new building, but the care that he was given was poor at best.
1. The place was filthy. Air conditioning vents were filled with dust, and it might take as long as three days to get a nurse to clean up a urine spill using bleach or 409 rather than swishing it around with water.
2. Few staff members washed their hands between patients. If we politely asked them to wash their hands before touching our fragile son, they would be resentful, or do a perfunctory job of rinsing them with water. There were sanitary hand wash disposers at the entrance of each room, but I would estimate that 19 out of 20 people, doctors, nurses, all hospital staff didn't use the disposer nor did they wash with even water.
3. Hypodermic needles were strewn about the floor. It might take a few days to get them picked up if we pointed out the problem.
4. Once my son was in surgery, the Oncology doctors had almost no further communication with him.
5. We were offerred almost no emotional help in dealing with our son's terminal illness, even though we asked for help from the Ted Mann center. Somehow we couldn't get the right hand to know what the left hand was doing.
6. When my son was first diagnosed as having terminal inoperable cancer he was 35 years old. When the doctor came out to tell us about this, he was most insensitive to my questions about the nature of the cancer. He became impatient with me after I asked him a couple of questions. We were given no compassion at that moment by anyone.
7. My son developed a terrible infection while he was there. I'll never know if it was cancer-related or if it was the unsanitary conditions at the hospital that led to the infection. It was the infection that really brought him to his death.
8. The office at my veterinarian is cleaner, and the veterinarian's surgical room is spotless. He washes his hands before and after he touches the dog, and the staff does the same. If only UCLA would follow these simple and medically appropriate procedures.
9. I don't know who is doing these ratings, but I must say that our entire experience there was rather terrible, filled with anxiety, filled with mishaps, and lacking in appropriate coordinating amoung services that were supposed to be available. The filth alone was more disgusting that I can ever describe, and I'm not a neat, clean freak.

If this hospital is Number 3, then the entire medical system is in dire trouble. I'm glad they moved. The place wasn't fit to house a chicken coop. But unless they change the way the clean and their own practices of sanitation, the new place will become filled with dust, mold, and all sorts of other toxic wastes that will endanger the lives of the patients. They also need to practice standard medical sanitary standards of thoroughly washing their hands between patients. They won't do this, I'm sure. Those gloves that they pick up out of the boxes protect the health care worker, not the patient.
I was there

Santa Monica, CA

#2 Jul 11, 2008
Rob7333 wrote:
I spent a lot of time in the Oncology ward at UCLA Medical Center in Westwood. My son had terminal cancer. I realize they have moved to a new building, but the care that he was given was poor at best.
1. The place was filthy. Air conditioning vents were filled with dust, and it might take as long as three days to get a nurse to clean up a urine spill using bleach or 409 rather than swishing it around with water.
2. Few staff members washed their hands between patients. If we politely asked them to wash their hands before touching our fragile son, they would be resentful, or do a perfunctory job of rinsing them with water. There were sanitary hand wash disposers at the entrance of each room, but I would estimate that 19 out of 20 people, doctors, nurses, all hospital staff didn't use the disposer nor did they wash with even water.
3. Hypodermic needles were strewn about the floor. It might take a few days to get them picked up if we pointed out the problem.
4. Once my son was in surgery, the Oncology doctors had almost no further communication with him.
5. We were offerred almost no emotional help in dealing with our son's terminal illness, even though we asked for help from the Ted Mann center. Somehow we couldn't get the right hand to know what the left hand was doing.
6. When my son was first diagnosed as having terminal inoperable cancer he was 35 years old. When the doctor came out to tell us about this, he was most insensitive to my questions about the nature of the cancer. He became impatient with me after I asked him a couple of questions. We were given no compassion at that moment by anyone.
7. My son developed a terrible infection while he was there. I'll never know if it was cancer-related or if it was the unsanitary conditions at the hospital that led to the infection. It was the infection that really brought him to his death.
8. The office at my veterinarian is cleaner, and the veterinarian's surgical room is spotless. He washes his hands before and after he touches the dog, and the staff does the same. If only UCLA would follow these simple and medically appropriate procedures.
9. I don't know who is doing these ratings, but I must say that our entire experience there was rather terrible, filled with anxiety, filled with mishaps, and lacking in appropriate coordinating amoung services that were supposed to be available. The filth alone was more disgusting that I can ever describe, and I'm not a neat, clean freak.
If this hospital is Number 3, then the entire medical system is in dire trouble. I'm glad they moved. The place wasn't fit to house a chicken coop. But unless they change the way the clean and their own practices of sanitation, the new place will become filled with dust, mold, and all sorts of other toxic wastes that will endanger the lives of the patients. They also need to practice standard medical sanitary standards of thoroughly washing their hands between patients. They won't do this, I'm sure. Those gloves that they pick up out of the boxes protect the health care worker, not the patient.
b.s. you did not walk around and watch employees in the bathroom, witness all of this or anytthing you state. I worked in the mattel center and know better. the staff is top notch. what ever your beef is, is not with UCLA, its with yourself. now step off!
Pauli

Los Angeles, CA

#3 Jul 11, 2008
I've worked at UCLA for many years, and all I can say is Rob7333 is being too kind. It's my misfortune to have my healthcare assigned to UCLA, which is why I've avoided having a checkup for the last 5 years. The Medical Center is a huge operation where some areas are top notch, but others are borderline criminal. The so-called rankings are meaningless.
Concerned Citizen

Los Angeles, CA

#4 Jul 11, 2008
What an insensitive jerk "I was there" is to Rob, who lost his son to terminal cancer. If he's typical of the kind of person who works at UCLA, he only exemplifies everything Rob says. And what does walking around to the bathrooms have to do with anything? Even if they wash their hands there, so what!

My experience at Cedars-Sinai, considered the top hospital in town by many -- though it's not on the list for anything, according to this article -- confirms that doctors and staff are insensitive, and don't wash their hands. I've been there for a ocuple of minor surgeries and the birth of my son. When I went to give birth, my water had broken and anyone knows the uterus/ fetus are highly liable to infection then, your barrier being gone, but after being made to wait and fill out all kinds of paperwork while I was in excruciating pain (although I was part of their medical group), the triage doctor didn't change his gloves after moving around the room touching furniture and unsanitary things -- did so only after my husband told him to.

During my stay, after they put catheters inside me hooked to monitors, they not only had all sorts of people with no business in my room wandering in with me spread0-eagled so taht my husband had to stand guard, but clerical assistants, NOT EVEN NURSING STAFF, kept coming in evry 15 mins. to read my monitor and poke their hands inside me -- saying that they were from different depts. that didn't share data, and had to do it themselves.

It was unbelievably degrading and horrible and of course I got an infection from all that poking and had to have a C-section because my doctor could no longer wait for me to dilate.

I'm pretty sure Rob's son get an infection from the hospital -- some 100,000 people die every year from hospital-induced infections. "Infection Control" is a dept. in hospitals, but it's about stats and the staff doesn't follow the recommendations.

The two day surgeries I had at Cedars required me to wait in the same pre-op room, where patients are on cots waiting for hours being prepped, in a giant room with each bed curtained off -- but later I saw some patients without even that, just lying in the middle of a room -- rude nurses kept screaming out ny name and date of birth so other patients and accompanying family members could hear, getting my blood pressure up. Horrible, horrible, horrible!(AFter I woke up from surgery I had an Filipino nurse who was much more sensitive.)

UCLA's new facility claiming to care about patient peace of mind is a huge step forward IF doctors and staff follow through. But doctors and many nurses treat patients like objects to poke and prod, and are unbelievably insensitive, even mentally cruel, making you feel old or too young or stupid and not worth their time to explain decisions to you.

Since: May 08

Porter Ranch

#5 Jul 11, 2008
My 33 year old brother just had surgery for a cancer on his tongue at UCLA. It was successful. He feels weak right now, but will get better in a few days. He got tongue cancer, but never smokes.

“working to pay obamas regime.”

Since: Mar 08

United States

#6 Jul 11, 2008
Rob7333 wrote:
I spent a lot of time in the Oncology ward at UCLA Medical Center in Westwood. My son had terminal cancer. I realize they have moved to a new building, but the care that he was given was poor at best.
1. The place was filthy. Air conditioning vents were filled with dust, and it might take as long as three days to get a nurse to clean up a urine spill using bleach or 409 rather than swishing it around with water.
2. Few staff members washed their hands between patients. If we politely asked them to wash their hands before touching our fragile son, they would be resentful, or do a perfunctory job of rinsing them with water. There were sanitary hand wash disposers at the entrance of each room, but I would estimate that 19 out of 20 people, doctors, nurses, all hospital staff didn't use the disposer nor did they wash with even water.
3. Hypodermic needles were strewn about the floor. It might take a few days to get them picked up if we pointed out the problem.
4. Once my son was in surgery, the Oncology doctors had almost no further communication with him.
5. We were offerred almost no emotional help in dealing with our son's terminal illness, even though we asked for help from the Ted Mann center. Somehow we couldn't get the right hand to know what the left hand was doing.
6. When my son was first diagnosed as having terminal inoperable cancer he was 35 years old. When the doctor came out to tell us about this, he was most insensitive to my questions about the nature of the cancer. He became impatient with me after I asked him a couple of questions. We were given no compassion at that moment by anyone.
7. My son developed a terrible infection while he was there. I'll never know if it was cancer-related or if it was the unsanitary conditions at the hospital that led to the infection. It was the infection that really brought him to his death.
8. The office at my veterinarian is cleaner, and the veterinarian's surgical room is spotless. He washes his hands before and after he touches the dog, and the staff does the same. If only UCLA would follow these simple and medically appropriate procedures.
9. I don't know who is doing these ratings, but I must say that our entire experience there was rather terrible, filled with anxiety, filled with mishaps, and lacking in appropriate coordinating amoung services that were supposed to be available. The filth alone was more disgusting that I can ever describe, and I'm not a neat, clean freak.
If this hospital is Number 3, then the entire medical system is in dire trouble. I'm glad they moved. The place wasn't fit to house a chicken coop. But unless they change the way the clean and their own practices of sanitation, the new place will become filled with dust, mold, and all sorts of other toxic wastes that will endanger the lives of the patients. They also need to practice standard medical sanitary standards of thoroughly washing their hands between patients. They won't do this, I'm sure. Those gloves that they pick up out of the boxes protect the health care worker, not the patient.
Wow. I have always thought it was a 'top-notch' place to go. I would've never have guessed about the true conditions of that hospital. Its scary to say the least. What you had to say is important...and we are listening.... Thanks.
World citizen

Los Angeles, CA

#7 Jul 11, 2008
What Rob said only confirms my last years experience at UCLA. 28 years ago we came to Los Angeles, specifically to have my daughter treated there from terminal kidney deseased. At that time the Pediatric Nephrologist did what I could say was a very good job. About 3 or 4 years ago she went back to UCLA for new transplant. She had a donor that was a friend of hers. The UCLA adult nephrologist refused to take this donor. They took upon themselves the place of God, deciding who would live and who had to die. They didn't give any acceptable reason, the best that they could come with was that many times a non-related donor will desist in the last minute. This could offset the patient. Better offset than dead I believe. Two years after my daughter was successfully transplanted at Cedars Sinai. Today, after 13 months, her kidney works perfectly. The story doesn't end here. According to the news UCLA doctors wanted to bring a japanese criminal to have a liver transplant here. I understand that one of the main UCLA surgeons went to Tokio to perform. Do I smell a juice donation? I really don't understand how UCLA could be considered such a big thing. US News and World Report, do I smell something rotten?
The Dude

Chatsworth, CA

#8 Jul 11, 2008
That is the problem with hospitals, we are almost always there for a bad reason, epecially if we lose a loved one while they are under that hospital's care, it doesn't matter how clean the place is or how friendly/attentive they are in those situations, it is a place you never want to be or go back to again, and every little thing you can find to a fault will be burned into your memory. Hopefully the people who posted above are doing well.
United States citizen

Tustin, CA

#9 Jul 12, 2008
As a hospital employee I can tell 90,000 people die every year from nascominal infections (hosptal aquired). I has agree with the prior post stating one ward of the hospital is not the same as another ward. Also these grades are based on what? How good the food is? Does hospital staff wash their hands? How well the Doctor sit down and listen to the patients and family. Most people dont realize that Nurses usally have very limited time to actually performe nursing care. They are required to document most of all activity and procedures that occur to the patient. It usally take 2 hours of paperwork just to admit one patient. Whats riducules is how some family members think that the nurse only has one patient when they are busy with three others. I have seen many times nurses that dont take a break for 8 hours. Also these are professional Nurses with degrees. Some families think that health care is a fast food industry. Please spend some time and take care of family member yourself. Change their diapers, keep them clean. So, that we can take care of them properly with right labs or medication or right test done.

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