OU med school receives $105M | The Co...

OU med school receives $105M | The Columbus Dispatch

There are 10 comments on the Columbus Dispatch story from May 1, 2011, titled OU med school receives $105M | The Columbus Dispatch. In it, Columbus Dispatch reports that:

Ohio University will use a $105 million donation - the largest private gift in the school's history - to build a medical college in Columbus to help fill a growing shortage of family physicians.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Columbus Dispatch.

JustaMom

Clyde, OH

#1 May 1, 2011
While I applaud the effort to ramp up primary care, the truth is that family practice residency programs across the country have trouble filling their slots. Plenty of doctors graduate from medical school. They simply don't choose family practice because of the low pay due to poor reimbursement and the long hours. Until their pay is comparable, all the medical schools in the world can't fix the demand. My mother saw her family doctor for a host of problems and spent about 40 minutes with him. He got $72 from the insurance company and due to the contract, could not bill her for the balance. But a 12 minute consult with the kidney doctor (who never touched her!) netted that doctor $585. And he got all of it.
Doc

Groveport, OH

#2 May 1, 2011
In family are several physicians, one an "primary care" internal medicine doctor. She has been in practice for over 20 years, she doesn't even come close to 180k. She's luck to break 100k.

Hell, why take out 250k+ in student loan debt, 250k+ in buying a practice so that you can have the 'privilege' of paying this off over 30 years at 3k+ a month. Why not become a Walmart manager to make an equivalent salary and skip the 500k+ in loans and 10 years of higher education. Not to mention how you have no control over your career, 3rd parties are making the decisions for you and not you and the patients.

But I'm sure there will be many on this forum who will claim all doctors are rolling in Bentlys with their gold plated wallets because they fail to see the sacrifice it takes to become and be a primary care physician.
tom

New Albany, OH

#3 May 1, 2011
JustaMom wrote:
While I applaud the effort to ramp up primary care, the truth is that family practice residency programs across the country have trouble filling their slots. Plenty of doctors graduate from medical school. They simply don't choose family practice because of the low pay due to poor reimbursement and the long hours. Until their pay is comparable, all the medical schools in the world can't fix the demand. My mother saw her family doctor for a host of problems and spent about 40 minutes with him. He got $72 from the insurance company and due to the contract, could not bill her for the balance. But a 12 minute consult with the kidney doctor (who never touched her!) netted that doctor $585. And he got all of it.
It would still work out to over 200K a year....maybe we should address the $585 number and we would all be able to afford health care. Being a Dr. is a great profession....most of the big houses are filled with Dr's....I assume the example you mention is on the low end....If a Dr. can make 200-300K a year I would assume he/she could find a way to feed their family...the big bucks should go to those that are finding advances in medicine as they research for a cure!!!
JustaMom

Clyde, OH

#4 May 1, 2011
tom wrote:
<quoted text>
It would still work out to over 200K a year....maybe we should address the $585 number and we would all be able to afford health care. Being a Dr. is a great profession....most of the big houses are filled with Dr's....I assume the example you mention is on the low end....If a Dr. can make 200-300K a year I would assume he/she could find a way to feed their family...the big bucks should go to those that are finding advances in medicine as they research for a cure!!!
That's gross revenue, assuming it's all collected. You still have to pay the staff and overhead. And overhead has sky-rocketed. By the time you pay staff, benefits, building costs, supplies.....well, do the math.
Lets See

Columbus, OH

#5 May 1, 2011
Until you all address the Standardized Care mentality which is NOTHING more than socialized medicine with insurance companies in the middle making all the money, it won't matter, folks.

I've recently arisen from the dead - major potassium deficiency thanks to over-radiation for pelvic cancer. Three years of utter misery until my kidneys finally failed.

For a mere a potassium suppliment a day, I'm back to work. It wasn't the GP who charges me for blood tests every six months, it was the kidney doc who found it. The GP quite obviously didn't even know what to look for. Had me on narcs for the pain and agony it caused to nerves and muscles, not to mention the heart flutters and a few stoppages.

Until you teach doctors to think outside the Standardized Care box with it's checklist of insurance codes, it truly won't matter if we have more docs or we don't. GPs are little more than clerks for insurance companies.
Good points all

Wooster, OH

#6 May 1, 2011
Hey, there have been some excellent points made here -- which unfortunately is kind of rare on these boards!

We recently changed doctors because we realized she was very "test-happy." She would order tests and then, after two office visits and $700 worth of tests, would decide how to treat you. It's frustrating because my wife and I are self-employed and carry high-deductible insurance, which is about $500-600 a month for a family. Between premiums and other expenses we always end up about 10 grand a year out of pocket. And no one is "sick."

I could tell long stories about how some doctors have absolutely no clue what tests and prescriptions cost. One small note on the RX pad can mean the difference between a low-cost,$15 generic and a $200 "new formulation" of the same drug. I have lived it.

Doctors deserve to make a lot of money. They study for years, take out massive loans, work like dogs and are subject to slow reimbursements, huge malpractice premiums and a number of other barriers to running a profitable business.

But doctors also need to make and keep themselves aware of what costs the patients are asked to pay; and what insurance companies are asked to pay. It's funny: when you tell a doctor you are self-pay, the costs go down. Sometimes way down. Why? Because they don't have to deal with insurance companies.

I think where we got off track with respect to healthcare and the associated costs in this country is when we, as a nation, began to believe that our medical care should be paid by "someone else." (Thank you, Lyndon Johnson.)

Let me throw out a wild "what if" scenario here:

What if health insurance was outlawed? What if, instead of dealing with health insurance, you dealt directly with your doctor to discuss care AND costs? What if, instead of feeding insurance companies billions of dollars annually, employers could simply provide their workers a "health care allowance," that went into an HSA-style IRA that grew tax-free, and compounded? What if, instead of socialized medicine, a small portion of your payroll taxes went to a national catastrophic care fund, designed to provide those expensive cancer treatments, heart operations, etc. that your own funds did not cover? What if we combined all of that with serious, meaningful medical liability Tort reform, and actually allowed doctors to practice real medicine instead of checklist-style defensive medicine? Finally, what if the government stopped giving away "free" medical care that doctors are expected to provide at a loss?

I think the following would happen: Patients would receive far better care; that care would cost far less; primary care doctors would make more money because of greatly reduced expenses and lower malpractice insurance, and the poor/disadvantaged actually would receive better care because doctors would provide it as part of their normal practice, at a cost those patients could afford -- like doctors USED to do!

Unrealistic? Perhaps. But something has to change, doesn't it?
Trythinking

Columbus, OH

#7 May 1, 2011
The OU med school clinic is one of Athens' best assets. Let's hope this new facility is downtown in a centralized location with easy access for people who need primary care.
Lolita Shih Tzu

Mount Vernon, OH

#8 May 1, 2011
Nice present, docs!Good for OU!

I'd like to know from where did you get these millions that you are giving away.
Black Lion

Columbus, OH

#9 May 1, 2011
So why do we continue to support them with taxpayer money??
Just Listening

United States

#10 May 1, 2011
They need the money to treat all the alledged rape victims.

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