Docs protest stealth calls on access for patients | The Columbus Dispatch

Alarmed by a shortage of primary-care doctors, Obama administration officials are recruiting a team of "mystery shoppers" to pose as patients, call doctors' offices and request appointments to see how difficult it is for people to get care when they need it. Full Story
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Just Saying

Dublin, OH

#243 Jul 6, 2011
Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
Imagine not being able to walk in--because of the sign that says that if your condition is not life threatening you must have insurance or $250 cash.
Illegal in this state.
Reader

Columbus, OH

#244 Jul 6, 2011
sam s wrote:
<quoted text>
The government can't run what it runs now. How is a goverment payer better. Look at the mess they have doing what they do now. Btw a pew poll found that over 50 percent of companies are going out of the health insurance business. Not just little companies. Verizon is one of them
I would love to see the poll. One question that I have has to do with the extent to which the companies are currently "in" the "health insurance business." Many large companies, particularly if they employ a lot of part-time, unskilled, or othewise low-paid workers will advertise "health benefits," which only means that the worker has the option of purchasing through the company something which they cannot afford. Wal-Mart is famous for the large numbers of their employees who qualify for Medicaid and other government subsidy programs.

People love to badmouth the government. For years the Postal Service was offered up as the classic example of government sloth and waste. Never mind that the Post Office has ALWAYS been required to operate in the black with no tax support--and managed to do so while paying its employees a fair wage. And until the advent of the internet and email (and possibly to a less extent FedEx and the like), it was the sole undisputed vehicle for delivery of every business document in the country. A postmark was considered an absolute form of documentation that could be relied upon.

Similarly both Medicare and Medicaid have had tremendous impact on the health of specific populations--and the income of a good many providers as well. Before you dismiss them as being slow, low or unreliable payers, ask yourself why Children's Hospital has gone to such great lengths to become the sole Medicaid provider to children in Central Ohio. And if you drive by the corner of Livingston and Parsons you may note that they haven't done too badly by that strategy.

Fine--if you don't want the government to become a single payer, then start requiring a defined contribution from employers. But so long as the government is the payer of last resort and no meaningful requirements placed on businesses, then business is going to find ever more creative ways to dump on government.
Reader

Columbus, OH

#245 Jul 6, 2011
Just Saying wrote:
<quoted text>
Illegal in this state.
Not so sure. That exact sign used to hang in a local ER.

Hospitals are not required to provide care to anyone who does not present with a life-threatening condition.

And having recently accompanied someone who did in fact have a life-threatening condition I can attest that even then there was a business office representative right there along with the health care personnel to ensure collection upfront of the insurance co-pay.
Tony

Chillicothe, OH

#246 Jul 6, 2011
reality check wrote:
..........then why don't we give weapons to mexican drug cartels..........
Because they can afford to buy them themselves...:)
Tony

Chillicothe, OH

#247 Jul 6, 2011
Just Saying wrote:
<quoted text>
Illegal in this state.
No it's not. If you walk into an ER with a "non-emergency", you CAN be refused treatment if you cannot prove you can pay.
Just Saying

Dublin, OH

#248 Jul 6, 2011
Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
Not so sure. That exact sign used to hang in a local ER.
Hospitals are not required to provide care to anyone who does not present with a life-threatening condition.
And having recently accompanied someone who did in fact have a life-threatening condition I can attest that even then there was a business office representative right there along with the health care personnel to ensure collection upfront of the insurance co-pay.
Look up the requirements of EMTALA.

As for the financial rep, that is going on everywhere and since the reform allows copays and deductibles, I don't know that that will change. There is nothing wrong with politely explaining you don't have the money up front (let's assume a $1500 deductible). They will attempt to collect but if you don't have it, you don't have it. It will be the your responsibility, though, to follow up with the financial aid office and see if there are any options for you.
Just Saying

Dublin, OH

#249 Jul 6, 2011
Reader wrote:
<quoted text>
I would love to see the poll. One question that I have has to do with the extent to which the companies are currently "in" the "health insurance business." Many large companies, particularly if they employ a lot of part-time, unskilled, or othewise low-paid workers will advertise "health benefits," which only means that the worker has the option of purchasing through the company something which they cannot afford. Wal-Mart is famous for the large numbers of their employees who qualify for Medicaid and other government subsidy programs.
People love to badmouth the government. For years the Postal Service was offered up as the classic example of government sloth and waste. Never mind that the Post Office has ALWAYS been required to operate in the black with no tax support--and managed to do so while paying its employees a fair wage. And until the advent of the internet and email (and possibly to a less extent FedEx and the like), it was the sole undisputed vehicle for delivery of every business document in the country. A postmark was considered an absolute form of documentation that could be relied upon.
Similarly both Medicare and Medicaid have had tremendous impact on the health of specific populations--and the income of a good many providers as well. Before you dismiss them as being slow, low or unreliable payers, ask yourself why Children's Hospital has gone to such great lengths to become the sole Medicaid provider to children in Central Ohio. And if you drive by the corner of Livingston and Parsons you may note that they haven't done too badly by that strategy.
Fine--if you don't want the government to become a single payer, then start requiring a defined contribution from employers. But so long as the government is the payer of last resort and no meaningful requirements placed on businesses, then business is going to find ever more creative ways to dump on government.
I haven't seen a poll of any indicators that high, so I am curious as well.
sam s

Delaware, OH

#250 Jul 7, 2011
Reader wrote:
<quoted text>Imagine not being able to walk in--because of the sign that says that if your condition is not life threatening you must have insurance or $250 cash.
That works for me. All these people on Medicaid needs to have a limit on how many we visits they can have for non emergencies. They wouldn't be able to go every other day because they have nothing better to go or have to get a narcotic script because they need some cash for their alcohol or smokes. Oh that's right their entitled.
sam s

Delaware, OH

#251 Jul 7, 2011
Reader wrote:
<quoted text>I would love to see the poll. One question that I have has to do with the extent to which the companies are currently "in" the "health insurance business." Many large companies, particularly if they employ a lot of part-time, unskilled, or othewise low-paid workers will advertise "health benefits," which only means that the worker has the option of purchasing through the company something which they cannot afford. Wal-Mart is famous for the large numbers of their employees who qualify for Medicaid and other government subsidy programs.

People love to badmouth the government. For years the Postal Service was offered up as the classic example of government sloth and waste. Never mind that the Post Office has ALWAYS been required to operate in the black with no tax support--and managed to do so while paying its employees a fair wage. And until the advent of the internet and email (and possibly to a less extent FedEx and the like), it was the sole undisputed vehicle for delivery of every business document in the country. A postmark was considered an absolute form of documentation that could be relied upon.

Similarly both Medicare and Medicaid have had tremendous impact on the health of specific populations--and the income of a good many providers as well. Before you dismiss them as being slow, low or unreliable payers, ask yourself why Children's Hospital has gone to such great lengths to become the sole Medicaid provider to children in Central Ohio. And if you drive by the corner of Livingston and Parsons you may note that they haven't done too badly by that strategy.

Fine--if you don't want the government to become a single payer, then start requiring a defined contribution from employers. But so long as the government is the payer of last resort and no meaningful requirements placed on businesses, then business is going to find ever more creative ways to dump on government.
Look it up on the Internet then

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