Practitioners of traditional medicine...

Practitioners of traditional medicine more open to 'complementary' treatments | The Columbus Disp...

There are 5 comments on the Columbus Dispatch story from Feb 27, 2011, titled Practitioners of traditional medicine more open to 'complementary' treatments | The Columbus Disp.... In it, Columbus Dispatch reports that:

Paula Kobelt, left, and Karen Lynch, registered nurses at Grant Medical Center, administer "healing touch" therapy to patient Diane Crislip in her hospital room.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at Columbus Dispatch.

MstrBee

Heath, OH

#1 Feb 27, 2011
Nice to know that old fashioned quackery is now called integrative medicine. I'd rather get a massage at Port Columbus.
Linda RosaRN

United States

#3 Feb 28, 2011
Shame on the Grant Medical Center for having a Healing Touch (HT) program. Hospitals should only offer science-based practices to the public, and not merely suggestions that they feel better with practices that have not passed scientific muster. Practices that offer no more than a possible placebo effect are considered unethical by the medical and nursing professions.

HT is a variation of Therapeutic Touch (TT), a practice that believes the body is merely a manifestation of a mysterious energy field that can reincarnate.(HT just piles on more nonsense to TT.) The basic premise behind TT and HT was put to the test in the 90's when a school girl conducted an experiment that demonstrated that practitioners could not feel this "human energy field," as they claimed. And without sensing this "field," how could they maniputate it for therapeutic benefit?

The hospital is on shaky grounds offering HT because JAMA editors allowed this statement in girl's paper, after rigorous peer review and a thorough literature search:
"To our knowledge, no other objective, quantitative study involving more than a few TT practitioners has been published, and no well-designed study demonstrates any health benefit from TT. These facts, together with our experimental findings, suggest that TT claims are groundless and that further use of TT by health professionals is unjustified." ("A Close Look at Therapeutic Touch," Rosa et al, JAMA 4/1/98—Vol 279, No. 13)

At this point, Healing Touch doesn't even have a plausible hypothesis. Science has not been able to detect this "human energy field" though they can detect radiation from distant galaxies.(Acupuncture has the same problem.)

If the hospital considers HT experimental, and certainly no more for that can be claimed, the public should know that experimental practices must be offered free of charge. But the reality is that HT is nothing more than a mystical, religious practice.
natdoc

Lexington, KY

#4 Mar 4, 2011
Linda RosaRN wrote:
Shame on the Grant Medical Center for having a Healing Touch (HT) program. Hospitals should only offer science-based practices to the public, and not merely suggestions that they feel better with practices that have not passed scientific muster. Practices that offer no more than a possible placebo effect are considered unethical by the medical and nursing professions.
HT is a variation of Therapeutic Touch (TT), a practice that believes the body is merely a manifestation of a mysterious energy field that can reincarnate.(HT just piles on more nonsense to TT.) The basic premise behind TT and HT was put to the test in the 90's when a school girl conducted an experiment that demonstrated that practitioners could not feel this "human energy field," as they claimed. And without sensing this "field," how could they maniputate it for therapeutic benefit?
The hospital is on shaky grounds offering HT because JAMA editors allowed this statement in girl's paper, after rigorous peer review and a thorough literature search:
"To our knowledge, no other objective, quantitative study involving more than a few TT practitioners has been published, and no well-designed study demonstrates any health benefit from TT. These facts, together with our experimental findings, suggest that TT claims are groundless and that further use of TT by health professionals is unjustified." ("A Close Look at Therapeutic Touch," Rosa et al, JAMA 4/1/98—Vol 279, No. 13)
At this point, Healing Touch doesn't even have a plausible hypothesis. Science has not been able to detect this "human energy field" though they can detect radiation from distant galaxies.(Acupuncture has the same problem.)
If the hospital considers HT experimental, and certainly no more for that can be claimed, the public should know that experimental practices must be offered free of charge. But the reality is that HT is nothing more than a mystical, religious practice.
Actually you should do a little better research. Both acupuncture and ayurvidic have a scientific basis and a long track record of producing results. I know we like to boast about our system of medicine, however, both of these alternatives have been in use for approx. 5000 years longer than ours. As far as our form of medicine having a sound scientific basis, olease read further in your JAMA articles you will find that 85% of "western medical treatments" are not scientifically validated.
natdoc

Lexington, KY

#5 Mar 4, 2011
Also you should probably check out the sites for the Holistic Nursing prectice and also the AMA site for Holistic medicine
Licensed Acupuncturist

Greentown, PA

#6 Mar 27, 2011
You can't denie it till you try it. I'm proud to say that after overcoming a tramatic brain injury with acupuncture therapy I am now licensed and truly believe in the power of acupuncture. Though there are many studies deminstrating that acupuncture works and works well. I only hope others can find the peace and joy that I get from acupuncture treatments and practice.

With peace and love

,Licensed Acupuncturist

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