Homeopath has changed our daughtera s life

Apr 22, 2010 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: Galway Advertiser

Owen Flatley's letter mocking homeopathy is arrant nonsense. His preference to be treated by a doctor from 2010 instead of 1807 overlooks the fact that Western medicine is a relatively new and exploratory form of medicine compared to acupuncture and Chinese medicine and homeopathy Lillian Van Eycken has helped thousands of people, but most ...

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C Redd

Cresskill, NJ

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#1
Apr 22, 2010
 
What a wonderful letter! It's so good to hear about what homeopathy did for your daughter. There are tens of thousands of people around the world who have the same great experiences with homeopathy every day.

Best wishes to you!
Mark

Glenview, Australia

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#2
Apr 22, 2010
 
C Redd wrote:
What a wonderful letter! It's so good to hear about what homeopathy did for your daughter. There are tens of thousands of people around the world who have the same great experiences with homeopathy every day.
Best wishes to you!
So her illness gets better after runnings its natural course which she wrongly attributes to homeopathy. Now she will continue to waste money on magic water.

Also the letter begins with a logical fallacy - appeal to antiquity. It doesn't matter how long homeopathy has been around, that is not a criteria for efficacy. The author is also wrong about testing as homeopathy does not get tested to the same standards that modern medicine gets tested.
ikz

New Delhi, India

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#3
Apr 23, 2010
 
Mark wrote:
<quoted text>
So her illness gets better after runnings its natural course which she wrongly attributes to homeopathy. Now she will continue to waste money on magic water.
Also the letter begins with a logical fallacy - appeal to antiquity. It doesn't matter how long homeopathy has been around, that is not a criteria for efficacy. The author is also wrong about testing as homeopathy does not get tested to the same standards that modern medicine gets tested.
Are you selectively blind or paid to write BS:

Please read " Following this she developed skin which looked like someone had scrubbed it with a wire brush and weeping. We went to ever doctor, every dermatologist in the country. We were finally told, by supposedly the best dermatologist in Europe that we would have to cover her in wet wraps ever night like a mummy and that by the time she was SEVEN she should start to come out of it — she was two at the time."

AND

"Someone recommended we go to Lillian Van Eycken. We told Lillian everything about our daughter including the near death experience and the fact that she had chronic indigestion. We had told all the consultants about the indigestion (she was too old for it to be colic and they all said it had nothing to do with her skin. Lillian gave us two small tablets one to be given that night and the next the following evening. The next morning our daughter’s skin had calmed dramatically; the following day it had cleared completely and has been clear since, some 10 years later."

This test was not good?
Mage

Eden, NC

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#4
Apr 23, 2010
 

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Anecdotes - the lifeblood of alternative "medicine".

It was amusing that she considers the pre-scientific origins of homeopathy to be a positive thing though. They developed this idea about disease before they even knew what disease was!
Mark

Glenview, Australia

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#5
Apr 23, 2010
 
ikz wrote:
<quoted text>This test was not good?
No its not a test at all. You have a sample size of one so how can you be sure it was the tablet that cured her? How can you be sure that she would not have improved at that time without treatment?

Its the logical fallacy 'Post-hoc ergo propter hoc'. This fallacy follows the basic format of: A preceded B, therefore A caused B, and therefore assumes cause and effect for two events just because they are temporally related (the latin translates to "after this, therefore because of this").
C Redd

Cresskill, NJ

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#6
Apr 24, 2010
 

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People who are interested in knowing more about conventional drugs, their proven lack of efficacy, the dangers they present to children and the elderly and the lack of science behind them will be interested in Dana Ullman's article linked to below:

www.huffingtonpost.com/dana-ullman/how-scient...
Mark

Glenview, Australia

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#7
Apr 24, 2010
 
C Redd

Cresskill, NJ

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#8
Apr 24, 2010
 

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Mark wrote:
<quoted text>
No its not a test at all. You have a sample size of one so how can you be sure it was the tablet that cured her? How can you be sure that she would not have improved at that time without treatment?
Its the logical fallacy 'Post-hoc ergo propter hoc'. This fallacy follows the basic format of: A preceded B, therefore A caused B, and therefore assumes cause and effect for two events just because they are temporally related (the latin translates to "after this, therefore because of this").
There's a problem with trying to use the "sample size of one" argument to claim that homeopathy doesn't work. This is a single case in which homeopathics have effected a cure (and, I might add, a cure where conventional drugs failed).

Homeopathy achieves tens of thousands of cures every year. Here's just one example of homeopathy saving lives and preventing people from becoming infected with disease. In 2007-8 Cuba used homeopathic immunization to avert an annual epidemic of leptospirosis.(Lepto. threatens Cuban lives every year during hurricane season.) Previously, Cuba used a conventional vaccine and experienced 1,000's of infects and 100+ deaths each year. With homeopathy, deaths were reduced to zero and infects reduced to 10 or fewer per month. In this one instance 100+ lives were saved and thousands of people avoided sickness.

Add this single example of homeopathic success to its success in treating 1/2 billion people around the world and you can easily see that homeopathy saves tens of thousands of lives and effects tens of thousands of cures. Now we have a sample size of tens of thousands!

I have to wonder if you are just uninformed and misinformed or paid to write the foolishness that appears here under your screen name.
Mark

Glenview, Australia

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#9
Apr 24, 2010
 
C Redd wrote:
<quoted text>
There's a problem with trying to use the "sample size of one" argument to claim that homeopathy doesn't work. This is a single case in which homeopathics have effected a cure (and, I might add, a cure where conventional drugs failed).
Homeopathy achieves tens of thousands of cures every year. Here's just one example of homeopathy saving lives and preventing people from becoming infected with disease. In 2007-8 Cuba used homeopathic immunization to avert an annual epidemic of leptospirosis.(Lepto. threatens Cuban lives every year during hurricane season.) Previously, Cuba used a conventional vaccine and experienced 1,000's of infects and 100+ deaths each year. With homeopathy, deaths were reduced to zero and infects reduced to 10 or fewer per month. In this one instance 100+ lives were saved and thousands of people avoided sickness.
Add this single example of homeopathic success to its success in treating 1/2 billion people around the world and you can easily see that homeopathy saves tens of thousands of lives and effects tens of thousands of cures. Now we have a sample size of tens of thousands!
I have to wonder if you are just uninformed and misinformed or paid to write the foolishness that appears here under your screen name.
It is curious how homeopathy seems to work so well on self limiting illness - the sorts of illness that goes away by itself.

And yes it was a sample size of one so there is no way to know for sure homeopathy helped her. How do you know that a real treatment finally kicked in?
Mage

Eden, NC

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#10
Apr 24, 2010
 

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C Redd wrote:
<quoted text>
There's a problem with trying to use the "sample size of one" argument to claim that homeopathy doesn't work. This is a single case in which homeopathics have effected a cure (and, I might add, a cure where conventional drugs failed).
Homeopathy achieves tens of thousands of cures every year. Here's just one example of homeopathy saving lives and preventing people from becoming infected with disease. In 2007-8 Cuba used homeopathic immunization to avert an annual epidemic of leptospirosis.(Lepto. threatens Cuban lives every year during hurricane season.) Previously, Cuba used a conventional vaccine and experienced 1,000's of infects and 100+ deaths each year. With homeopathy, deaths were reduced to zero and infects reduced to 10 or fewer per month. In this one instance 100+ lives were saved and thousands of people avoided sickness.
Add this single example of homeopathic success to its success in treating 1/2 billion people around the world and you can easily see that homeopathy saves tens of thousands of lives and effects tens of thousands of cures. Now we have a sample size of tens of thousands!
I have to wonder if you are just uninformed and misinformed or paid to write the foolishness that appears here under your screen name.
The Cuban homeopathy experiment was so successful that no one other than the homeopaths reported it and they were so busy celebrating its success, they didn't have time to actually write a paper about it!

Press release: Mage casts Heal spell on 1,000,000 Africans with malaria. All are cured.
Mark

Glenview, Australia

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#11
Apr 24, 2010
 
Mage wrote:
<quoted text>
The Cuban homeopathy experiment was so successful that no one other than the homeopaths reported it and they were so busy celebrating its success, they didn't have time to actually write a paper about it!
Quite correct Mage - here is a report about it:

http://www.quackometer.net/blog/labels/cuba.h...
C Redd

Cresskill, NJ

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#12
Apr 24, 2010
 
Mage wrote:
Anecdotes - the lifeblood of alternative "medicine".
It was amusing that she considers the pre-scientific origins of homeopathy to be a positive thing though. They developed this idea about disease before they even knew what disease was!
To clarify Mage's reference to "the pre-scientific origins of homeopathy" for other readers here:

Hippocrates described a system of medicine in which similar treats similar more than 2,000 years ago. Two hundred years ago Samuel Hahnemann discovered and developed the use of potentized natural substances to treat and cure all types of disease--physical, mental and emotional. Most homeopathic remedies do not contain even one molecule of the original substance. Homeopathy works by stimulating the immune system to heal us in a natural way. Homeopathy works without putting material amounts of chemicals or other substances into our bodies. Material amounts of chemicals/substances always present risks to the body.

The immune system itself is not "pre-scientific" even though we did not know about its existence in earlier times. Homeopathy itself is far from "pre-scientific". Theories on how it may work tie in to quantum physics, the structure of liquid water, the actions of silica chips and electromagnetic resonant waves. Magnet resonance imaging proves there is a difference between pure water and water which has been potentized homeopathically with a natural substance.

Recommended reading is "The Structure of Liquid Water", R. Roy, and "The Theory of High Dilutions", Conte, Berliocchi, LaVergne and others.
Mark

Glenview, Australia

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#13
Apr 25, 2010
 
Why is it homeopaths continually try to qualify their nonsense with scientific terms yet claim that their nonsense cannot be tested scientifically?

Yet more carp from the keyboard of big placebo shill C Redd.
Mark

Glenview, Australia

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#14
Apr 25, 2010
 
C Redd do you also believe that blood letting should be practised as it was 1000 years ago?
C Redd

Cresskill, NJ

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#15
Apr 25, 2010
 

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ikz wrote:
<quoted text>
Are you selectively blind or paid to write BS:
Please read " Following this she developed skin which looked like someone had scrubbed it with a wire brush and weeping. We went to ever doctor, every dermatologist in the country. We were finally told, by supposedly the best dermatologist in Europe that we would have to cover her in wet wraps ever night like a mummy and that by the time she was SEVEN she should start to come out of it — she was two at the time."
AND
"Someone recommended we go to Lillian Van Eycken. We told Lillian everything about our daughter including the near death experience and the fact that she had chronic indigestion. We had told all the consultants about the indigestion (she was too old for it to be colic and they all said it had nothing to do with her skin. Lillian gave us two small tablets one to be given that night and the next the following evening. The next morning our daughter’s skin had calmed dramatically; the following day it had cleared completely and has been clear since, some 10 years later."
This test was not good?
Well, IKZ these people are both -- selectively blind AND paid to write BS. "Skeptic" clubs are financed by big pharma. See:

http://elephantsandmice.wordpress.com/
Mage

Eden, NC

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#16
Apr 25, 2010
 
C Redd wrote:
Homeopathy itself is far from "pre-scientific". Theories on how it may work tie in to quantum physics, the structure of liquid water, the actions of silica chips and electromagnetic resonant waves. Magnet resonance imaging proves there is a difference between pure water and water which has been potentized homeopathically with a natural substance.
Homeopathy IS pre-scientific. It's based on the concept of vitalism (basically, health is magic energy), which has been completely thrown out by science. Hahnemann didn't know about bacteria or fungi or parasites or viruses.

All the "theories" homeopaths have come up with about how homeopathy works (even though it doesn't) have been nonsensical word salad. The quantum nanomolecular super string strands are vibrating at a frequency which harmonizes with the human soul's immune function equation, allowing it to act on nano-chemical photons.

And let me guess about the MRI imaging on homeopathic solutions...it couldn't be reproduced by anyone other than a homeopath?
Mage

Eden, NC

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#17
Apr 25, 2010
 
C Redd wrote:
<quoted text>
Well, IKZ these people are both -- selectively blind AND paid to write BS. "Skeptic" clubs are financed by big pharma. See:
http://elephantsandmice.wordpress.com/
There's the obligatory conspiracy talk.

A common tactic among reality denialists: alt medicine quacks, Creationists, Moon Hoaxers, Truthers, Birthers, Holocaust Revisionists...
Mark

Glenview, Australia

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#18
Apr 25, 2010
 
Lets look at the original claims:

"Owen Flatley’s letter mocking homeopathy is arrant nonsense. His preference to be treated by a doctor from 2010 instead of 1807 overlooks the fact that Western medicine is a relatively new and exploratory form of medicine compared to acupuncture and Chinese medicine and homeopathy"

This is the logical fallacy appeal to antiquity - the age of something is irrelevant to its efficacy.

"Lillian Van Eycken has helped thousands of people, but most importantly to me she completely changed our young daughter’s life."

What is this based on? The self promotion by Van Eyken?(note the author has the name wrong).

“She was born normally but had a severe choking incident very early in her life she stopped breathing several times and we thought we has lost her. Thank God we managed to get her breathing again.”

Irrelevant to the story except it creates empathy with the subject.

“Following this she developed skin which looked like someone had scrubbed it with a wire brush and weeping.”

Sounds like eczema which is a common childhood complaint although it appears the author is trying to like it to the earlier episode.

“We went to ever doctor, every dermatologist in the country.”

Really? Every doctor & dermatologist in Ireland? How many 1000s of doctors did they see???

“We were finally told, by supposedly the best dermatologist in Europe that we would have to cover her in wet wraps ever night like a mummy and that by the time she was seven she should start to come out of it — she was two at the time!”

Why didn’t they name the dermatologist? So we cannot confirm her story. Also the wet wrap therapy is normally only used for 1 to 2 weeks.

“Someone recommended we go to Lillian Van Eycken. We told Lillian everything about our daughter including the near death experience and the fact that she had chronic indigestion. We had told all the consultants about the indigestion (she was too old for it to be colic and they all said it had nothing to do with her skin.”

They were probably right.

“Lillian gave us two small tablets one to be given that night and the next the following evening. The next morning our daughter’s skin had calmed dramatically; the following day it had cleared completely and has been clear since, some 10 years later.
Lillian had given her white arsenic — a combined cure for shock (the near death experience) and digestive disorders (the chronic indigestion). The more diluted the dose in homeopathy the more potent, so the arsenic was harmless, but proved a potent cure.
We were also told that our daughter was asthmatic and would have to start to use inhalers. We went to Lillian who treated her homoeopathically and out daughter has never been near an inhaler in her life.”

These are anecdotes, without seeing the actual doctors reports they are meaningless.

“So much for the placebo effect!“

Note how no information is provided so we can verify the claims. I suspect that this is a fabricated story for self promotion by a quack.
ikz

Pune, India

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#19
Apr 26, 2010
 
Mark wrote:
Lets look at the original claims:
Irrelevant to the story except it creates empathy with the subject.
“Following this she developed skin which looked like someone had scrubbed it with a wire brush and weeping.”
Sounds like eczema which is a common childhood complaint although it appears the author is trying to like it to the earlier episode.
“We went to ever doctor, every dermatologist in the country.”
Really? Every doctor & dermatologist in Ireland? How many 1000s of doctors did they see???
“We were finally told, by supposedly the best dermatologist in Europe that we would have to cover her in wet wraps ever night like a mummy and that by the time she was seven she should start to come out of it — she was two at the time!”
Why didn’t they name the dermatologist? So we cannot confirm her story. Also the wet wrap therapy is normally only used for 1 to 2 weeks.
“Someone recommended we go to Lillian Van Eycken. We told Lillian everything about our daughter including the near death experience and the fact that she had chronic indigestion. We had told all the consultants about the indigestion (she was too old for it to be colic and they all said it had nothing to do with her skin.”
They were probably right.
“Lillian gave us two small tablets one to be given that night and the next the following evening. The next morning our daughter’s skin had calmed dramatically; the following day it had cleared completely and has been clear since, some 10 years later.
Lillian had given her white arsenic — a combined cure for shock (the near death experience) and digestive disorders (the chronic indigestion). The more diluted the dose in homeopathy the more potent, so the arsenic was harmless, but proved a potent cure.
We were also told that our daughter was asthmatic and would have to start to use inhalers. We went to Lillian who treated her homoeopathically and out daughter has never been near an inhaler in her life.”
Some news from your country:

CLINICAL tests were never carried out on the latest seasonal flu vaccine - a first-time combination of seasonal flu with the feared swine flu H1N1 - that has left a baby girl fighting for her life in a Perth hospital and sparked fits, fevers and vomiting in up to 60 toddlers across the country.

Please ask the parents what they think of the scientific basis of this vaccination protocol!

You remember the one child that died because of the homeopathic treatment!
ikz

Pune, India

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#20
Apr 26, 2010
 
Mark wrote:
C Redd do you also believe that blood letting should be practised as it was 1000 years ago?
This practise was part of the scientific conventional doctor's system of removing blood tainted with GERMS.

Why is it quoted under homeopathy?

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