Can You Pass an 8th Grade Test from 1912?

Aug 13, 2013 Full story: politix.topix.com 1,075

This exam was taken by middle schoolers in Bullitt County, Kentucky. The real test contained 58 questions and wasn't multiple choice.

Full Story
Idiots

Princeton, KY

#1321 Nov 30, 2013
Should be able to pass but many can't
Retired Farmer

Paducah, KY

#1322 Nov 30, 2013
Tough wrote:
<quoted text>
That is sad. Those stories hurt. Seriously.
That was the reality of the "good old days" in Dixie.

It wasn't really a class system though, not in the traditional sense. In a class system a person can at least in theory work their way up to a higher class. That was impossible in the old South. It was more like India's Hindu caste system. You were born into your caste and you were expected to stay in that caste.

Desegregation might have broken that system up if private Christian schools had been made illegal, but they weren't. As a result the top caste is even more removed from everybody else now than it was in the 1950s-60s.
Tough

Greenville, KY

#1323 Nov 30, 2013
Again. A sad state of affairs. Good informational posts. Mice to learn.
Old school

Greenville, KY

#1324 Nov 30, 2013
Is it really that bad?
Tough

Greenville, KY

#1325 Nov 30, 2013
Afraid it is. Barge Man and Retired tell stories similar to others I've heard.
Just Me

Owensboro, KY

#1326 Nov 30, 2013
My Dad was born in 1903; poor, white and the son of a sharecropper, one of 13 children. He finished 8th grade at age 12 and had a better education than I had at age 18 when I graduated at the top of my high school class. He and all of his siblings attended those little one room schools and managed to find their way out of poverty by putting their knowledge to use in the world.
You can say all you want that people can't "escape" poverty but my father's family proves that you can if you learn the value of education combined with a good work ethic. They worked hard, saved their money, didn't believe in debt and every one of them had their own home and most had their own businesses by the end of their life. My sharecropper grandfather was finally able to save enough money to buy his own farm by the time he was 47 years old. He spent the last 30 years of his life growing hemp on his own land.
Retired Farmer

Paducah, KY

#1327 Nov 30, 2013
Just Me wrote:
My Dad was born in 1903; poor, white and the son of a sharecropper, one of 13 children. He finished 8th grade at age 12 and had a better education than I had at age 18 when I graduated at the top of my high school class. He and all of his siblings attended those little one room schools and managed to find their way out of poverty by putting their knowledge to use in the world.
You can say all you want that people can't "escape" poverty but my father's family proves that you can if you learn the value of education combined with a good work ethic. They worked hard, saved their money, didn't believe in debt and every one of them had their own home and most had their own businesses by the end of their life. My sharecropper grandfather was finally able to save enough money to buy his own farm by the time he was 47 years old. He spent the last 30 years of his life growing hemp on his own land.
My grandfather did something similar. However, he did not do it by staying and working in the social system that he grew up in. He joined the U.S. Army in 1904 and stayed 20 years. He then came home, bought a farm, and did fairly well. Funny (not so funny) thing was he lost his farm in the Great Depression. He owed some money on it, but he was current in his payments, had enough money in the bank to pay off the note, and was drawing his Army pension. Yet he lost it. Seems the bank that held the note and held his savings went broke. President of the bank told his cronies that the bank was going to go under on Sunday night, opened up, and let them draw their money out. Everybody else lost theirs when the bank announced it was broke on Monday morning. Then the receivers gave him 90 days to find another bank to refinance his farm mortgage. When he could not, he had to sell at a loss. And guess what? One of the bank president's cronies bought it.
Tough

Greenville, KY

#1328 Nov 30, 2013
Just Me wrote:
My Dad was born in 1903; poor, white and the son of a sharecropper, one of 13 children. He finished 8th grade at age 12 and had a better education than I had at age 18 when I graduated at the top of my high school class. He and all of his siblings attended those little one room schools and managed to find their way out of poverty by putting their knowledge to use in the world.
You can say all you want that people can't "escape" poverty but my father's family proves that you can if you learn the value of education combined with a good work ethic. They worked hard, saved their money, didn't believe in debt and every one of them had their own home and most had their own businesses by the end of their life. My sharecropper grandfather was finally able to save enough money to buy his own farm by the time he was 47 years old. He spent the last 30 years of his life growing hemp on his own land.
Even though the world and economy now different, the same ethics still pertain to success. And it is those ethics if still followed today will bring solid ground and security. Thank you.
Tough

Greenville, KY

#1329 Nov 30, 2013
Barge man and retired farmer. Thanks for the stories and knowledge. I have enjoyed and learned. Unfortunately I'm going to take my need for knowledge to another arena. Too much hate and ugliness on this site. Keep the home fires burning and imparting your wisdom on those like me who needed it. It has been a pleasure
Jeff

Middlesboro, KY

#1332 Dec 1, 2013
Tough test
Bella

West Liberty, KY

#1337 Dec 5, 2013
TopMod15 wrote:
Not as easy as it sounds
no I can't
OMG

United States

#1340 Dec 5, 2013
No
tyi

Greenville, KY

#1341 Dec 5, 2013
Yes
things change

Danville, KY

#1342 Dec 5, 2013
nothin stays the same
Observation

Hopkinsville, KY

#1343 Dec 6, 2013
things change wrote:
nothin stays the same
Yes. One thing never changes: human nature.
Toes

Elizabethtown, KY

#1344 Dec 6, 2013
TopMod15 wrote:
Not as easy as it sounds
lol i got a B on it
where is this test at

Newport, KY

#1347 Dec 7, 2013
I want to take it
huh

Murray, KY

#1349 Dec 7, 2013
no
USS ARIZONA

Gilbertsville, KY

#1351 Dec 7, 2013
A lot of folks sure flunked history today. Today is December 7 "the Day the will live in Infamy" and there's been almost no mention of it. Even Google didn't put up a special logo.
Grover

Harold, KY

#1352 Dec 7, 2013
Yep.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Louisville Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Cardinals Basketball 47 min da L1C4 6
Police Exemption/misconduct 1 hr ShepCop 4
jenna trumme 5 hr jealous 2
Ben Kemble Thu Justin 4
Grade lane hit and run (Travis Christy)This is ... (Nov '12) Thu defeated 130
best night spot to meet thirty something ladie... Wed ForumCommando 2
Why did Wave 3 Kevin & Carrie harned get divorce? (Aug '13) Nov 26 luvthemkats1 38
Carla Rushing Aka The pornstar Cody lane Living... (Nov '11) Nov 17 Vinohutch20 259
Louisville Dating
Find my Match

Louisville People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

Louisville News, Events & Info

Click for news, events and info in Louisville

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]

NFL Latest News

Updated 2:19 pm PST

Bleacher Report 2:19PM
Robert Griffin III Comments on Being Benched by Redskins HC Jay Gruden
Bleacher Report 4:00 PM
Breaking Down What Colt McCoy Brings to the Washington Offense in Place of RGIII
Bleacher Report 4:00 AM
Complete Bengals Preview for Bucs Game
NBC Sports 7:26 AM
Griffin's departure from starting lineup could be temporary
NBC Sports 8:58 AM
Vontaze Burfict not taking part in Friday practice