Can You Pass an 8th Grade Test from 1...

Can You Pass an 8th Grade Test from 1912?

There are 1076 comments on the politix.topix.com story from Aug 13, 2013, titled Can You Pass an 8th Grade Test from 1912?. In it, politix.topix.com reports that:

This exam was taken by middle schoolers in Bullitt County, Kentucky. The real test contained 58 questions and wasn't multiple choice.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at politix.topix.com.

Tough

Cadiz, KY

#1291 Nov 24, 2013
Hard as heck!!!
Lol

Mount Vernon, KY

#1293 Nov 25, 2013
I did
Tough

United States

#1298 Nov 26, 2013
Nice....
Old school

Cadiz, KY

#1299 Nov 26, 2013
Thing is most of those century old tests were not meant for nor taken by the average students of any state. Extreme basics were the norm. Most got no more than a base education to deal with life on the farm or enough to apprentice under a parent , relative, or friend who taught them a valuable trade.
Retired Teacher

Paducah, KY

#1300 Nov 26, 2013
Old school wrote:
Thing is most of those century old tests were not meant for nor taken by the average students of any state. Extreme basics were the norm. Most got no more than a base education to deal with life on the farm or enough to apprentice under a parent , relative, or friend who taught them a valuable trade.
You are half wrong and half right. By the 1890s almost all states had some form of final examination that every child who graduated from the 8th grade had to take and pass. For the vast majority schooling ended with the 8th grade.

Many children never went to school at all, however, especially in the South. Kentucky did not pass a compulsory school attendance law until 1896, and then the legal school leaving age was 14. South Carolina did not pass a compulsory school attendance law until 1915. Child labor in factories was also still legal. As a result, many children were put to work in factories. This was especially prevalent in the South, where the major industrial employers of children were the cotton textile mills and tobacco factories. Most of these children grew up completely illiterate. This problem was recognized by the U.S. Army in World War 1, when it discovered that about a quarter to a third of draftees from the rural South were illiterate.
Old school

Cadiz, KY

#1301 Nov 26, 2013
Agree completely. You just spelled it out much better than me!!!
Old school

Cadiz, KY

#1302 Nov 26, 2013
Or is that "I"? I do get confused!
Tommy tippy

New Albany, IN

#1303 Nov 26, 2013
Oh no
Retired Teacher

Paducah, KY

#1308 Nov 27, 2013
Here is an interesting observation by the North Carolina Superintendent of Public Instruction in 1900. In case the link does not go to the right page, it is on page 480:

http://books.google.com/books...

Despite the fact that he points up, many people, especially religious fundamentalists in rural areas, were ardently opposed to educating girls.
um

United States

#1309 Nov 27, 2013
What in the world
weird

United States

#1310 Nov 27, 2013
This is silly
Old School

Cadiz, KY

#1311 Nov 28, 2013
But interesting.
Tough

Cadiz, KY

#1312 Nov 29, 2013
Retired Teacher wrote:
Here is an interesting observation by the North Carolina Superintendent of Public Instruction in 1900. In case the link does not go to the right page, it is on page 480:
http://books.google.com/books...
Despite the fact that he points up, many people, especially religious fundamentalists in rural areas, were ardently opposed to educating girls.
Education for women was a mixed bag back then. Very limited opportunities except in select fields, regardless of religious position.
Barge Man

Hopkinsville, KY

#1313 Nov 29, 2013
I think the biggest reason for opposing educating girls had to do with the fact that if they were educated they would break out of the "select fields" open to them. For the religious angle, preachers in the South were some of the strongest opposers of women getting the right control their own property, much less the right to vote.
Tough

Cadiz, KY

#1314 Nov 29, 2013
You are on to something. Threats to the job market have historically created opposition to any group threatening.
Barge Man

Hopkinsville, KY

#1315 Nov 29, 2013
I don't think it had as much to do with the job market as it was about a threat to the existing social order. The privileged class in the South opposed public education in general, not just education of girls (and blacks). But, strangely, a lot of uneducated poor whites also opposed free public education for their own children. That was because of the deeply ingrained idea that tax funded public schools were "pauper schools" (some states actually called them that, notably South Carolina and Missouri). It was a slap at poor whites' sense of honor to send their children to those free public schools. It took a long hard 50-60 year fight to change that perception. Now, sadly, it seems to be going back the other way, especially in places where all the better off white people send their kids to private Christian schools.
Tough

Cadiz, KY

#1316 Nov 29, 2013
You are exactly right. In Deep South especially many send their students to inferior schools for that exact purpose. Good post.
Old School

Cadiz, KY

#1318 Nov 30, 2013
Barge Man wrote:
I don't think it had as much to do with the job market as it was about a threat to the existing social order. The privileged class in the South opposed public education in general, not just education of girls (and blacks). But, strangely, a lot of uneducated poor whites also opposed free public education for their own children. That was because of the deeply ingrained idea that tax funded public schools were "pauper schools" (some states actually called them that, notably South Carolina and Missouri). It was a slap at poor whites' sense of honor to send their children to those free public schools. It took a long hard 50-60 year fight to change that perception. Now, sadly, it seems to be going back the other way, especially in places where all the better off white people send their kids to private Christian schools.
Unfortunately I don't think it's socioeconomics , almost totally race based.
Retired Farmer

Paducah, KY

#1319 Nov 30, 2013
Old School wrote:
<quoted text>
Unfortunately I don't think it's socioeconomics , almost totally race based.
I disagree. True, race is a big part of it, but the social class system of the rural South is also a big factor.

I grew up white and poor. When I started to first grade schools were still segragated. The teacher segragated the class into 3 groups. Group 1 was the main street merchant's kids, the banker's kid, etc., ones whose parents were members of the same main street chruch and social circle that the teacher was a member of. Group 2 was the land owning farmers' kids and that sort. Group 3 was the poor kids, the "outsiders" or what used to be called "poor white trash." The teacher spent about half her time with the elite group, two-thirds of the remaining half with Group 2, and very little with the bottom group. Of the kids in that bottom group, I was the only one that eventually finished high school. When the school was integrated, that same teacher added a fourth group at the bottom for the blacks.
Tough

Cadiz, KY

#1320 Nov 30, 2013
Retired Farmer wrote:
<quoted text>
I disagree. True, race is a big part of it, but the social class system of the rural South is also a big factor.
I grew up white and poor. When I started to first grade schools were still segragated. The teacher segragated the class into 3 groups. Group 1 was the main street merchant's kids, the banker's kid, etc., ones whose parents were members of the same main street chruch and social circle that the teacher was a member of. Group 2 was the land owning farmers' kids and that sort. Group 3 was the poor kids, the "outsiders" or what used to be called "poor white trash." The teacher spent about half her time with the elite group, two-thirds of the remaining half with Group 2, and very little with the bottom group. Of the kids in that bottom group, I was the only one that eventually finished high school. When the school was integrated, that same teacher added a fourth group at the bottom for the blacks.
That is sad. Those stories hurt. Seriously.

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