Our recommendation: Springboro voters should say 'yes' the first time to school levies

Feb 5, 2008 Full story: Dayton Daily News 31,412

Recommended local sites More... UD sports info, pictures and discussions Are you a UD sports fan? Whether you like basketball, volleyball, soccer, men's or women's teams -- Doesn't matter -- this site is for ... via Dayton Daily News

Full Story
Just Watching

Cleveland, OH

#23687 Feb 28, 2013
Great News wrote:
Interest seems to be growing throughout the state. We are not alone in our travails. Progress is never as simple as wishing it so and thus it becomes. Breaking the cycle that has lead our children, parents, staff, administrators, and taxpayers to this point will require the will to see the point through.

Opposition will be strong, as thoroughly entrenched opponents feels the threat to their status quo.

The odd thing will be when the moment of insight becomes clarity, and the sudden realization that this could benefit everyone financially, professionally, and personally.

There is no right or wrong, just how we approach the problem. Fifty years down our current path has lead us to nothing more than besting the state minimums.

It is time to do better for all of our sake.
new to boro

Cleves, OH

#23688 Feb 28, 2013
Everyone, thanks so much for the information! I'm hearing positive things on this board now, which is encouraging.(that's not to say positive as in "we're great", but positive as in "we need some work.") I agree with all of you - from my limited information at this moment - and I have spoken to some teachers who agree...not good to assume the teachers are all resistant to change. I'd rather not bash the Teacher's Union or the teachers who support them, IMHO we should give the benefit of the doubt and agree to disagree and then move on. It sounds like we are moving in the right direction. I hope so, for my kids' sake. Just a side note, he told me "school is boring." Time to challenge them, Springboro!
Just Watching wrote:
<quoted text>
Interest seems to be growing throughout the state. We are not alone in our travails. Progress is never as simple as wishing it so and thus it becomes. Breaking the cycle that has lead our children, parents, staff, administrators, and taxpayers to this point will require the will to see the point through.
Opposition will be strong, as thoroughly entrenched opponents feels the threat to their status quo.
The odd thing will be when the moment of insight becomes clarity, and the sudden realization that this could benefit everyone financially, professionally, and personally.
There is no right or wrong, just how we approach the problem. Fifty years down our current path has lead us to nothing more than besting the state minimums.
It is time to do better for all of our sake.
A little honesty please

Piqua, OH

#23689 Feb 28, 2013
"Dr. Kohls and the council, developed the philosophy and methods to Children First Budgeting. The philosophy is a zero based budget process applied by the Springsboro Ohio Schools.

The plan turned a projected $30 million deficit into a $10 million surplus with no additional burden on citizens property taxes."

Give a little credit where credit is due. The teachers agreed to a pay freeze for multiple years and agreed to pay more of their health care costs. A majority of the money saved was due to the teachers giving up pay and benefits.

As for the kids first and making all of the changes this past year, again a little honesty is needed.
1st - Technology (wireless internet) had to be put into the schools because of the requirement starting in 2014 to test electronically. Without that requirement who knows if the board would have spent the extra money. Actually I know - they wouldn't have.
On those same lines, they bought extra computers - again their hand was forced due to the upcoming state requirements to test electronically.
2nd - Buses had to be bought so that busing could be maintained within the district (something that many of the board members fought to bring back). Again, their hand was forced on this issue as well, if not, they wouldn't have spent the money.
3rd - The board has bragged about how they focused on the kids and bought new books but again this was required due to the new core curriculum that is being flowed down from the state.

This distric has a lot of work ahead to figure out budgets and educating our students but let's be honest with why changes are being made and stop implying it is all about the students - we all know it is all about the $$$.
truth to power

Girard, OH

#23690 Feb 28, 2013
[QUOTE who="A little honesty pleaseThis distric has a lot of work ahead to figure out budgets and educating our students but let's be honest with why changes are being made and stop implying it is all about the students - we all know it is all about the $$$.
[/QUOTE]

Yeah! It's all about the money, alright! It's obviou our board cares not iota about Boro's kids!
I heard our board's majority has plans to ransack the budget surplus, then head on down to Monday's grand opening of the Horseshoe Casino!
;-)
ursmarterthantha t

Springboro, OH

#23691 Feb 28, 2013
A little honesty please wrote:
"Dr. Kohls and the council, developed the philosophy and methods to Children First Budgeting. The philosophy is a zero based budget process applied by the Springsboro Ohio Schools.
The plan turned a projected $30 million deficit into a $10 million surplus with no additional burden on citizens property taxes."
Give a little credit where credit is due. The teachers agreed to a pay freeze for multiple years and agreed to pay more of their health care costs. A majority of the money saved was due to the teachers giving up pay and benefits.
As for the kids first and making all of the changes this past year, again a little honesty is needed.
1st - Technology (wireless internet) had to be put into the schools because of the requirement starting in 2014 to test electronically. Without that requirement who knows if the board would have spent the extra money. Actually I know - they wouldn't have.
On those same lines, they bought extra computers - again their hand was forced due to the upcoming state requirements to test electronically.
2nd - Buses had to be bought so that busing could be maintained within the district (something that many of the board members fought to bring back). Again, their hand was forced on this issue as well, if not, they wouldn't have spent the money.
3rd - The board has bragged about how they focused on the kids and bought new books but again this was required due to the new core curriculum that is being flowed down from the state.
This distric has a lot of work ahead to figure out budgets and educating our students but let's be honest with why changes are being made and stop implying it is all about the students - we all know it is all about the $$$.
Cmon wake up. The district never had a 30 million dollar deficit. It was a hoax to get more cash from you. The wage freeze and pipleine dollars are the reasons for the turn around. And you idiots that want esc services, well you are idiots. How in the world can the land of retire rehires be cost effective. Stay out of Springboro, wcesc!
masterofconcrete pourers

Dayton, OH

#23692 Feb 28, 2013
So, when will you bums vote for a levy? That's original topic, duh!
Why no answers

Norwalk, OH

#23693 Feb 28, 2013
When we need one
Just Watching

Cleveland, OH

#23694 Feb 28, 2013
truth to power wrote:
<quoted text>
Yeah! It's all about the money, alright! It's obviou our board cares not iota about Boro's kids!
I heard our board's majority has plans to ransack the budget surplus, then head on down to Monday's grand opening of the Horseshoe Casino!
;-)
Somebody better start caring about the 2000 plus kids who are not getting the education they deserve.

Do you notice that no one provides an alternative reading of the data?

What are they going to say in refutation, 42% is good enough to pass?

Spare us the snarky comments and tell us how you would reallocate our existing resources to apply them where they are needed most urgently.

Our junior high school, in math and reading, is in a horrid state according to the scores on the OAA tests. While some children are doing very well, an unacceptably large percentage is performing abysmally below the 63% mark.

The snide and dismissive comments will not save these 2000 plus children's futures.
Just Watching

Cleveland, OH

#23695 Feb 28, 2013
When I was a child, the junior high school I attended had 6 periods of 55 minutes each, 5 minutes between classes, and half hour for lunch.
It got me 170 hours of instruction per year in each subject.

The junior high in Springboro has 8 periods of 42 minutes each. 130 hours of instruction per year in each subject.

Over the course of 185 days in a school year that amounts to 40 plus more hours of instruction that I received in english, math, science, social studies, music, and 20 more hours of industrial arts, and PE.

We had no study halls until we got to high school.

To make up that forty hours the kids today in Springboro would need to attend 48 weeks of school rather than the 37 they currently enjoy.

Given the state of our reading and math scores in the Junior High, we should probably forgo the fun electives and concentrate once again on the core classes and return to 6 periods of instruction.
Do something

Piqua, OH

#23696 Mar 1, 2013
Just Watching wrote:
<quoted text>
Somebody better start caring about the 2000 plus kids who are not getting the education they deserve.
Do you notice that no one provides an alternative reading of the data?
What are they going to say in refutation, 42% is good enough to pass?
Spare us the snarky comments and tell us how you would reallocate our existing resources to apply them where they are needed most urgently.
Our junior high school, in math and reading, is in a horrid state according to the scores on the OAA tests. While some children are doing very well, an unacceptably large percentage is performing abysmally below the 63% mark.
The snide and dismissive comments will not save these 2000 plus children's futures.
I'm curious, the test scores have not changed that much over the past decade per your comparison of school funding and test scores so where are all of those Springboro graduates that were only proficient? How many went on to college anyways even though you would have called them failures. How many are successful adults?

How about, instead of constantly complaining how bad we are doing YOU come up with some ideas that can help this district.
Worth Remembering

Piqua, OH

#23697 Mar 1, 2013
I would love it wrote:
<quoted text>
Its not my communication. You assume way too much out of a simple sentence. Let me get this out there so you can relax. I fully support Dr. Kohls, Rigano and Petroni! I absolutley oppose Miller, the union, SEA and the Babbalonies. I, like everyone else don't know if the a Charter school will improve Boro but it is worth a study. More importantly I hope this discussion brings to light that our school is not as good as the administrator, teachers and the union would like us to beleive. I hope this discussion wakes everyone up and we all realize there is a ton of room for improvement. Realization is the first step for improvement. We need to realize Excellent with Distinction honors the state bestows upon schools is not worth the paper it is written on.
Bestowing the label of excellence on districts that do little to provide for students beyond basic proficiency helps no one. Even in elite, affluent suburbs, communities are lulled into complacent acceptance of the status quo even as their children perform at a level nowhere near excellent. This phenomenon is nicely explained by Jay Greene, coauthor of
When the Best Is Mediocre:

State accountability systems and the desire to rationalize the lack of quality options have encouraged the elites to compare their affluent suburban districts to the large urban ones in their state. These inappropriate comparisons have falsely reassured them that their own school districts are doing well. This false reassurance has also perhaps undermined the desire among the elites to engage in dramatic education reform. As long as the elites hold onto the belief that their own school districts are excellent, they have little desire to push for the kinds of significant systemic reforms that might improve their districts as well as the large urban districts. They may wish the urban districts well and hope matters improve, but their taste for bold reform is limited by a false contentment with their own situation.

Radio audiences laugh at the imaginary Lake Wobegon, where ALL students are above average, but Ohio has taken things to a level that some have described as Lake Wobegon on steroids, and the damage to the educational system is becoming evident. It is Time to take an honest look at state standards and to see how these “excellent” districts are truly performing. Parents, policymakers, and the general public no longer can afford to pretend that the emperor is clothed. It is time to take a look at the ugly, naked truth about the accountability system in Ohio.– www.oagc.com
Just Watching

Cleveland, OH

#23698 Mar 1, 2013
Do something wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm curious, the test scores have not changed that much over the past decade per your comparison of school funding and test scores so where are all of those Springboro graduates that were only proficient? How many went on to college anyways even though you would have called them failures. How many are successful adults?
How about, instead of constantly complaining how bad we are doing YOU come up with some ideas that can help this district.
Perhaps you could leaf back through the pages of this forum and find more than a few of the suggestions I have passed forward.

The ones that I personally know that have been rated as Proficient have had a hard time getting a foot hold in college and in life. They tend to expect more than what they are actually earning and discourage rather easily. None that I know have gotten out in four years from college and are frustrated by their lack of progress and the pace at which they are pursuing a better life.

I have been hiring these kids for the past 20 years and these are merely my observations, your mileage may vary.

The young men and women I have talked to knew the score and what the easy classes were that prepared them not a whit for life. They took them because they were easy and got good scores in them. Hindsight from a kid who graduated three or four years ago is illuminating to listen to if you have the time.
All Talk NO GO

Dayton, OH

#23699 Mar 1, 2013
Do something wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm curious, the test scores have not changed that much over the past decade per your comparison of school funding and test scores so where are all of those Springboro graduates that were only proficient? How many went on to college anyways even though you would have called them failures. How many are successful adults?
How about, instead of constantly complaining how bad we are doing YOU come up with some ideas that can help this district.
If he or she was capable of doing something they would have to change their tag to "Just Doing" it's much easier to be "Just Watching"
Just Watching

Cleveland, OH

#23700 Mar 2, 2013
Top-down federalized "Common Core" standards are now sweeping the country. It's important to remember that while teachers-union control freaks are on board with the Common Core regime, untold numbers of rank-and-file educators are just as angered and frustrated as parents about the Big Ed power grab. The program was concocted not at the grassroots level, but by a bipartisan cabal of nonprofits (led by lobbyists for the liberal Bill Gates Foundation), statist business groups and hoodwinked Republican governors. As I've reported previously, this scheme, enabled by the Obama administration's "Race to the Top" funding mechanism, usurps local autonomy in favor of lesson content and pedagogical methods.

One teacher described a thought-control training seminar in her school district titled "Making the Common Core Come Alive." A worksheet labeled "COMMON CORE MIND SHIFTS" included the following rhetorical muck:--The goal of curriculum should not be the coverage of content, but rather the discovery of content.... If done well, Common Core will elevate our teaching to new heights, and emphasize the construction of meaning, while deepening our understanding of our students."

--"In our classrooms, it is the students' voices, not the teachers', that are heard."

Blah, blah, blah. In practice, Common Core evades transparency by peddling shoddy curricular material authored by anonymous committees. It promotes faddish experiments masquerading as "world-class" math and reading goals. Instead of raising expectations, Common Core is a Trojan horse for lowering them. California, for example, is now citing Common Core as a rationale for abandoning algebra classes for 8th graders. Common Core's "constructivist" approach to reading is now the rationale for abandoning classic literature for "informational texts."

Claims that Common Core bubbled up from the states are bass-ackward. A shady nonprofit group called "Achieve Inc.," stocked with federal-standards advocates who've been around since the Clinton years, designed the materials. They were rubber-stamped by the National Governors Association and the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and subsidized by the Gates Foundation.

In states like Texas, which " rejected

" Common Core, similar secretive alliances prevail. The Texas Education Service Center Curriculum Collaborative, a nonprofit group led by government officials, designed the "CSCOPE" curriculum now used in 80 percent of the state's schools. The state Board of Education, local schools and parents were denied access to the online CSCOPE curriculum database -- which was exempted from disclosure rules. In fact, dissemination of the lessons was considered a crime until earlier this month. Only after parents and teachers across the state blew the whistle on radical CSCOPE lesson plans (including designing a new flag for a socialist lesson) did the state take steps to rein in the CSCOPE zealots.

Grassroots activists in Indiana, Alabama, Utah and nearly a dozen other states are now educating themselves and their state legislatures about the centralized education racket, whether it's under the guise of Common Core or any other name. Last week, in response to a passionate parent-driven protest, the Indiana state Senate passed legislation to halt Common Core implementation. Anti-Common Core bills are moving through the Alabama state legislature, where lawmakers are especially concerned about how Common Core's intrusive database gathering would violate student privacy.

As Texas goes, so goes the nation. The fight against the federalization of academic standards is a national education Alamo.

Props to Michelle Malkin

We are not condemned to wallowing in the base of educational standards, regardless of who is doing the promotion, the state or the feds.

We can set our own level of expectations and devise ways of accomplishing them that raise the bar towards actual achievement.

Our children deserve as much.
ursmarterthantha t

Springboro, OH

#23701 Mar 2, 2013
Once again do the math, Students with no snow days are only in session 180 days max, and can be 179. The 185 is what the teachers get paid for. 5 days of no kids. GET OUT OF THE WARREN COUNTY ESC SERVICES AND LET US RUN OUR SCHOOL
Just Watching wrote:
When I was a child, the junior high school I attended had 6 periods of 55 minutes each, 5 minutes between classes, and half hour for lunch.
It got me 170 hours of instruction per year in each subject.
The junior high in Springboro has 8 periods of 42 minutes each. 130 hours of instruction per year in each subject.
Over the course of 185 days in a school year that amounts to 40 plus more hours of instruction that I received in english, math, science, social studies, music, and 20 more hours of industrial arts, and PE.
We had no study halls until we got to high school.
To make up that forty hours the kids today in Springboro would need to attend 48 weeks of school rather than the 37 they currently enjoy.
Given the state of our reading and math scores in the Junior High, we should probably forgo the fun electives and concentrate once again on the core classes and return to 6 periods of instruction.
We Are On Our Way

Piqua, OH

#23702 Mar 2, 2013
All Talk NO GO wrote:
<quoted text> If he or she was capable of doing something they would have to change their tag to "Just Doing" it's much easier to be "Just Watching"
Thank you for just watching, and DOING what's right for our school children and community; educating Springboro with a broader vision for our children's future. Our schools and community have only just begun as we review our 2012 Achievements of what our reform minded BOE majority has already done! We're on our way; and no way, will we not continue standing firm on our principles against our political opposition's agenda to reverse our children's future to status quo business as usual.

Judged:

15

11

11

Reply »
Report Abuse Judge it!
Just the Beginning

Piqua, OH

#23703 Mar 2, 2013
Springboro Board of Education Highlights from 2012

Investments in our classrooms
A renewed focus on individual student success is critical as we adopt higher standards required by Ohio’s Common Core Curriculum by 2014-15 ( www.corestandards.org ). We’ve invested $350,000 in a highly acclaimed reading curriculum for first through fifth graders, added high school AP and math courses, and reduced some elementary class sizes. And this is just the beginning.

Keeping pace with technology in 2013
We are focused on preparing our students to be career and college ready, which includes encouraging digital learning. The district is working on its first comprehensive technology plan. Our five-year forecast includes $1,100,000 to bring our infrastructure up to date, go wireless in every classroom, build the technology backbone for our schools, and replace 1,100 of the district’s aging computers. This is necessary in order to equip our classrooms for the new state tests in 2014.

Innovative problem solving
Our district purchased 20 buses in 2006; however, we have not purchased any since. With no prior plan for bus purchases, we learned that our optimum fleet is 70 buses, and 20 buses will age out of our fleet in the next two to four years. With the administration, we worked to find an affordable solution that will bring 21 new buses to the district over the next five years without placing a disproportionate burden on our budget. And the district is working to revise bus routes for 2013-2014 to be more efficient and cost-effective.

Connecting the community to our schools
A Board of Education’s role is to represent the community within the school district, and transparency with our community is a priority. Our board created three committees in 2012—budget and finance, policy, and compensation and evaluation. These committees’ meetings follow Ohio’s Sunshine Laws: they are open to the public with announced meeting times and published minutes. The bridge with the community has been broadened online and on television as well. Board meeting documents are all available through the district website www.Springboro.org , and board meetings are broadcast on EATV Channel 21 through the Miami Valley Communications Council. Visit www.MVCC.net for the broadcast schedule.

Judged:

14

12

11

Reply »
Report Abuse Judge it!
Hooray for Us

Piqua, OH

#23704 Mar 2, 2013
How fortunate are we Springboro families and taxpaying homeowners to be represented by reform minded board members and school district leaders,
proudly DOING what's right for our strong schools and strong community; Reforming budgets assuring all Springboro students a quality education while living within our financial means, with no increase in taxes! How Absolutely Amazingly Awesome is that Achievement for Our Children's Future!

Now that's DOING it right-- the Boro Proud Way --deserving of community wide applause and continued support for children first budgeting during the ongoing challenges of 2013!

Judged:

16

15

15

Reply »
Report Abuse Judge it!
Math Major

Irwin, PA

#23705 Mar 2, 2013
ursmarterthanthat wrote:
Once again do the math, Students with no snow days are only in session 180 days max, and can be 179. The 185 is what the teachers get paid for. 5 days of no kids. GET OUT OF THE WARREN COUNTY ESC SERVICES AND LET US RUN OUR SCHOOL
<quoted text>
The kids are screwed even more, they now only receive 129 hours of instruction. Thanks for the correct info.
Just A Lapdog

Dayton, OH

#23706 Mar 3, 2013
All Talk NO GO wrote:
<quoted text> If he or she was capable of doing something they would have to change their tag to "Just Doing" it's much easier to be "Just Watching"
Do not let all the post that reference DOING trick you, they are all from Just Watching trying to legitimize the nonsenses and fear mongering that they thrive off of. We all know that its one of two BOE members posting this nonsense. If not Just A Lapdog of theirs.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Wedding Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Judge overturns Montana's gay marriage ban 3 hr Lawrence Wolf 74
Studies show many Americans not reading the Bib... 3 hr thetruth 18
Ill. House Approves Legalizing Same-Sex Civil U... (Dec '10) 3 hr KiMerde 51,241
Unmasking The "Gay" Agenda (Feb '08) 4 hr Shadow Walker 1,023
BC denies accreditation to anti-Gay Christian l... 6 hr DebraE 69
Pastors opposed to gay marriage swear off all c... 6 hr Listen to the Word 6
Abercrombie content as he leaves office 8 hr Guru 7

Wedding People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE