Largest US Protestant churches on gay clergy

Feb 28, 2010 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: The Oregonian

A look at where the largest Protestant churches in the United States stand on gay clergy: ?UNITED METHODIST CHURCH: 7.9 million U.S. members.

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“The Kingdom of God Begins NOW!”

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#318
Jan 3, 2013
 
Selecia Jones- JAX FL wrote:
<quoted text>Do you mean like IN GOD WE TRUST added to the bills in 1957?
And 'under God' in the pledge, made up by a flag seller....

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#319
Jan 3, 2013
 

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Selecia Jones- JAX FL wrote:
<quoted text>Do you mean like IN GOD WE TRUST added to the bills in 1957?
Yes. But IN GOD WE TRUST was already being used on US coins in the mid 1860s. So it shouldn't be surprising it would show up on US paper currency.

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#320
Jan 3, 2013
 

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RevKen wrote:
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On the contrary, that was the whole point of creating the framework in the first place - so that it COULD be amended - without losing the basis for the principles that were first defined. If that is any sort of admission, I gladly make it.
And, Well,... if you had already taken time to read the Federalist Papers, as well as getting an understanding of the motivations of Jefferson and Franklin and a few others in their group, you would have likely gained a different view of the actual civil rights that we should expect to defend for each other.
When they completed the task of executing the Constitution, Franklin made a prophetic comment. He said something to the effect, " Gentlemen, you have managed to create a Constitutional Republic. Now the task will be to see if you can keep it."
We must not fear to take civil rights and the defense of the personal liberty of the individual citizen to the extensions that are both practical and logical. This includes allowing consenting adults the right to the benefits of a civil union.
Just because the Constitution does not have the words you would demand as proof of intent does not mean that the principles of its tenets are not present.
Rev. Ken
Argue whatever you like. You were wrong because you believed something you had heard, not something you had researched. You said the constitution guaranteed same sex marriage. I told you it didn't I told you it didn't guarantee any marriage. As usual you disagreed.
So try this link. http://www.usconstitution.net/constnot.html

Marriage

In 2004, a lot of controversy began to swirl around the topic of marriage as homosexual marriage entered the news once again. In 1999, the Vermont Supreme Court ordered that the state must make accommodations for gay unions, bringing the issue into the public eye. Vermont created civil unions as a result. In 2004, the Massachusetts Supreme Court went a step further, and ruled that the state must accommodate not just an institution equal to marriage, as civil union was designed to be, but that gay marriage itself must be offered in the state. Subsequently, mayors in New York and California began to offer gay marriage in their towns and cities, citing civil rights concerns. Those opposed to gay marriage began to urge that an amendment to the Constitution be created to define marriage as being between a man and a woman only. Opponents of the amendment pointed to the failed Prohibition Amendment as a reason why such social issues should stay out of the Constitution. In the absence of any such amendment, however, marriage is not mentioned in the Constitution at any point. More information is available on the Marriage Topic Page.

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#321
Jan 3, 2013
 

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MiddleWay wrote:
<quoted text>
And 'under God' in the pledge, made up by a flag seller....
So I'm curious. Who was the flag seller? How did they come to think of adding "under God" to a pledge being done to our flag? You know that "under God" had to go before congress before it was included correct? You realize it was President Eisenhower that pushed congress to make the addition of words? Did this flag maker know Eisenhower?

“For this reason...”

Since: Feb 10

Marriage = Man + Woman 4 Life

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#322
Jan 3, 2013
 

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No Surprise wrote:
<quoted text>
So I'm curious. Who was the flag seller? How did they come to think of adding "under God" to a pledge being done to our flag? You know that "under God" had to go before congress before it was included correct? You realize it was President Eisenhower that pushed congress to make the addition of words? Did this flag maker know Eisenhower?
It would seem MW has his own interpretation of history to go along with his own interpretation of scripture.

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#323
Jan 4, 2013
 
The Pledge of Allegiance was written in 1892 by Francis Bellamy (1855–1931), who was a Baptist minister, a Christian socialist,[3] and the cousin of socialist utopian novelist Edward Bellamy (1850–1898). The original "Pledge of Allegiance" was published in the September 8 issue of the popular children's magazine The Youth's Companion as part of the National Public-School Celebration of Columbus Day, a celebration of the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbus's arrival in the Americas. The event was conceived and promoted by James B. Upham, a marketer for the magazine, as a campaign to instill the idea of American nationalism by selling flags to public schools and magazines to students.[4][5][6][7]

Bellamy's original Pledge read as follows:[8][9]

I pledge allegiance to my Flag and the Republic for which it stands, one nation indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.

Students swearing the Pledge on Flag Day in 1899

The Pledge was supposed to be quick and to the point. Bellamy designed it to be recited in 15 seconds. As a socialist, he had initially also considered using the words equality and fraternity[7] but decided against it - knowing that the state superintendents of education on his committee were against equality for women and African Americans.[10]

Francis Bellamy and Upham had lined up the National Education Association to support the "Youth's Companion" as a sponsor of the Columbus Day observance along with the use of the American flag. By June 29, 1892, Bellamy and Upham had arranged for Congress and President Benjamin Harrison to announce a proclamation making the public school flag ceremony the center of the Columbus Day celebrations (this was issued as Presidential Proclamation 335). Subsequently, the Pledge was first used in public schools on October 12, 1892, during Columbus Day observances organized to coincide with the opening of the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago, Illinois.[11]

“The Kingdom of God Begins NOW!”

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#324
Jan 4, 2013
 
Louis A. Bowman (1872–1959), an attorney from Illinois, was the first to initiate the addition of "under God" to the Pledge. The National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution gave him an Award of Merit as the originator of this idea.[13][14] He spent his adult life in the Chicago area and was Chaplain of the Illinois Society of the Sons of the American Revolution. At a meeting on February 12, 1948,[13] Lincoln's Birthday, he led the Society in swearing the Pledge with two words added, "under God." He stated that the words came from Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. Though not all manuscript versions of the Gettysburg Address contain the words "under God", all the reporters' transcripts of the speech as delivered do, as perhaps Lincoln may have deviated from his prepared text and inserted the phrase when he said "that the nation shall, under God, have a new birth of freedom." Bowman repeated his revised version of the Pledge at other meetings.[13]

In 1951, the Knights of Columbus, the world's largest Catholic fraternal service organization, also began including the words "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance.[15] In New York City, on April 30, 1951, the Board of Directors of the Knights of Columbus adopted a resolution to amend the text of their Pledge of Allegiance at the opening of each of the meetings of the 800 Fourth Degree Assemblies of the Knights of Columbus by addition of the words "under God" after the words "one nation." Over the next two years, the idea spread throughout Knights of Columbus organizations nationwide. On August 21, 1952, the Supreme Council of the Knights of Columbus at its annual meeting adopted a resolution urging that the change be made universal and copies of this resolution were sent to the President, the Vice President (as Presiding Officer of the Senate) and the Speaker of the House of Representatives. The National Fraternal Congress meeting in Boston on September 24, 1952, adopted a similar resolution upon the recommendation of its president, Supreme Knight Luke E. Hart. Several State Fraternal Congresses acted likewise almost immediately thereafter. This campaign led to several official attempts to prompt Congress to adopt the Knights of Columbus’ policy for the entire nation. These attempts failed.

In 1952, Holger Christian Langmack wrote a letter to President Truman suggesting the inclusion of "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance. Mr. Langmack was a Danish philosopher and educator who came to the United States in 1911. He was one of the originators of the Prayer Breakfast and a religious leader in Washington, D.C. President Truman met with him along with several others to discuss the inclusion of "under God" and "love" just before "liberty and justice".[citation needed]

At the suggestion of a correspondent, Representative Louis C. Rabaut of Michigan sponsored a resolution to add the words "under God" to the Pledge in 1953.

History can be your friend if you study it.

LOL.....

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#325
Jan 4, 2013
 

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MiddleWay wrote:
<quoted text>
And 'under God' in the pledge, made up by a flag seller....
You stated the above. You stated a flag seller made up the words "..under God.." in the pledge of allegiance.
In your two further posts the only information you supplied about a flag seller is the following...
"The event was conceived and promoted by James B. Upham, a marketer for the magazine, as a campaign to instill the idea of American nationalism by selling flags to public schools and magazines to students.[4][5][6][7]."
None of your pasted information stated "..under God.." was first made up by a flag seller. Your pasted information shows a number of individuals liked that phrase to be included in a pledge. But none of the pasted information states they were a flag seller as you stated.

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#326
Jan 4, 2013
 

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MiddleWay wrote:
In 1952, Holger Christian Langmack wrote a letter to President Truman suggesting the inclusion of "under God" in the Pledge of Allegiance. Mr. Langmack was a Danish philosopher and educator who came to the United States in 1911. He was one of the originators of the Prayer Breakfast and a religious leader in Washington, D.C. President Truman met with him along with several others to discuss the inclusion of "under God" and "love" just before "liberty and justice".[citation needed]
At the suggestion of a correspondent, Representative Louis C. Rabaut of Michigan sponsored a resolution to add the words "under God" to the Pledge in 1953.
History can be your friend if you study it.
LOL.....
History can be your friend if you don't exclude some from the rest. A number of individuals are responsible for "..under God.." being a part of the pledge of aligiance :)
http://voices.yahoo.com/pastor-helped-put-und...
The Rev. George M. Docherty, the man responsible for inspiring congress to add the phrase, "under God" into the Pledge of Allegiance, has died at the ripe old age of 97. Pastor Docherty died at his home in central Pennsylvania on Thanksgiving.
In 1952, when George M. Docherty was pastor of the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church in Washington D.C., he gave a sermon in which he argued that the Pledge of Allegiance should acknowledge God. Two years later, on February 7, 1954, Rev. Docherty learned that President Dwight Eisenhower would be attending services at his church. So he decided to give the aforementioned sermon again. At the conclusion of the service, Rev. Docherty had a discussion with Presidnet Eisenhower regarding the relevance of the sermon. You can imagine how delighted he was to discover that President Eisenhower was in full agreement with him.

The very next day, Rep. Charles G. Oakmon (R-Mich) introduced a bill to add "under God" to the Pledge of Allegiance (a companion bill was also introduced in the Senate). Clearly, President Eisenhower was instrumental in getting Rep. Oakmon to introduce the bill. And he did so as a direct result of sitting in the pews of Rev. Docherty's church on that fateful day. President Dwight Eisenhower signed the bill into law on Flag Day that same year.

“The Kingdom of God Begins NOW!”

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#328
Jan 5, 2013
 
So it wasn't from our founding fathers?

No, it was during the 'red' scare.

Fear always works in herding the naive, always the enemy, never the peacemaker....

Since: Aug 09

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#329
Jan 7, 2013
 
MiddleWay wrote:
(In reply to No surprise)

So it wasn't from our founding fathers?
....
No one can deny that many of the founding fathers of the United States of America were men of deep religious convictions based in the Bible and their Christian faith in Jesus Christ. Of the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence, nearly half (24) held seminary or Bible school degrees.- About.com

Patrick Henry
Ratifier of the U.S. Constitution

"It cannot be emphasized too strongly or too often that this great nation was founded, not by religionists, but by Christians; not on religions, but on the gospel of Jesus Christ. For this very reason peoples of other faiths have been afforded asylum, prosperity, and freedom of worship here."
--The Trumpet Voice of Freedom: Patrick Henry of Virginia, p. iii.

John Quincy Adams -
"The general principles, on which the Fathers achieved independence, were the only Principles in which that beautiful Assembly of young Gentlemen could Unite, and these Principles only could be intended by them in their address, or by me in my answer. And what were these general Principles? I answer, the general Principles of Christianity, in which all these Sects were United: And the general Principles of English and American Liberty, in which all those young Men United, and which had United all Parties in America, in Majorities sufficient to assert and maintain her Independence."

"Now I will avow, that I then believe, and now believe, that those general Principles of Christianity, are as eternal and immutable, as the Existence and Attributes of God; and that those Principles of Liberty, are as unalterable as human Nature and our terrestrial, mundane System."
--Adams wrote this on June 28, 1813, excerpt from a letter to Thomas Jefferson.

"I am a real Christian – that is to say, a disciple of the doctrines of Jesus Christ."
--The Writings of Thomas Jefferson

Alexander Hamilton -
Signer of the Declaration of Independence and Ratifier of the U.S. Constitution

"I have carefully examined the evidences of the Christian religion, and if I was sitting as a juror upon its authenticity I would unhesitatingly give my verdict in its favor. I can prove its truth as clearly as any proposition ever submitted to the mind of man."
--Famous American Statesmen.

The phrase, "under God," is a concept long known to the Christians and the Free Masons, the members of both groups whose authority is received through the ancient priesthood after Melchizedek.

Rev. Ken

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