Since: Mar 08

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#1 Jan 8, 2010
Jasmine Guy was bullied for being light skin and biracial in Atlanta(black majority city, in 2005 Atlanta was the fifth poorest U.S. city) http://www.answers.com/topic/jasmine-guy

Since: Mar 08

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#2 Jan 8, 2010
Jasmine Guy
Black Biography: Jasmine Guy
Personal Information
Born c. 1964 in Boston, MA; daughter of William (a minister and college professor) and Jaye (a high school English teacher; maiden name, Rudolph) Guy.
Education: Graduated from Northside High School of the Arts, Atlanta, GA; studied dance with Alvin Ailey's American Dance Theater, New York City.
Career
American Dance Theater, artist with second and third companies, c. 1981-83; performer in stage musicals, including The Wiz, Bubbling Brown Sugar, Leader of the Pack, and Dancin' in the Streets, c. 1983-87. Principal television work includes lead in comedy series A Different World, NBC, 1987--, and made-for-television movie A Killer Among Us, 1991. Principal film work includes roles in School Daze, 1988, and Harlem Nights, 1989. With group Full Force, cut debut album, Jasmine Guy, for Warner Brothers, 1991.
Life's Work
Jasmine Guy has made a name for herself playing snobby Whitley Gilbert on the highly rated television show A Different World. The part has made Guy a star, but it demonstrates only a small facet of her talent--she can dance, sing, and pull off a tense dramatic role with equal finesse. As Whitley, Guy fairly seethes with prissiness and propriety. As a would-be pop singer, however, the former Alvin Ailey dancer radiates erotic heat and moves flawlessly from jazz to hip hop to new jack-swing. The actress told Essence magazine that her success has not come on easy terms. "I've been so driven that whole chunks of my life are blurs," she said. "I'm trying to live in the present, trying to enjoy reaping the benefits of eight years of perseverance.... I've worked hard and, having achieved a little, I find it hard not to want to work harder to achieve even more."
The gifts of beauty and talent, however, were not enough to assure Guy a happy childhood. She was born in Boston but raised in Atlanta. Her father, a minister and college professor, is black. Her mother, a high school English teacher, is white. Guy told People that she was often the target of criticism from darker-skinned classmates in the Atlanta public schools. "I remember getting into several fights in grade school because black kids would think I thought I was pretty because I had light skin and long hair," she recalled. "They said I always tried to talk properly. But I wasn't trying to seem better. I just wanted to be me."
Even now Guy often finds herself addressing the issue of her skin color. "I'm tired of hearing about the plight of the mulatto," she told Essence. "It's old news. Sure, it's caused me pain. Just the other day, a dark-skinned friend was saying how she'd always envied me. Well, I told her I'd always been envious of the shade of her skin. It's important that chocolate women of the world know they're beautiful." She added: "I spent years worrying about these things, crying in my diary. But I finally stopped myself, stopped finding fault with my big eyes or my blemishes. Like so many other people, I had to fight feeling ugly. We're all different, yet we're all the same. Why as women are we always feeling bad about ourselves?"
Guy helped bolster her self-image by singing in her father's church choir and by performing in stage musicals. "I always sang in church," she told Jet magazine. "I was the loud alto in the back." Her talents landed her a spot in Atlanta's prestigious Northside High School of the Arts, where she studied dance, drama, and voice. "I was Anita in West Side Story when I was 13 and that really opened my eyes to what was out there and what I was capable of doing," she said.

Since: Mar 08

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#3 Jan 8, 2010
Guy's parents were rather dismayed when she won the opportunity to study dance with the Alvin Ailey company in New York City. At the tender age of seventeen, Guy left Atlanta to make her own way in the world--on $75 a week. She performed with Ailey's second and third companies and auditioned frequently for Broadway and Off-Broadway dancing roles. "New York was a rude awakening," she told Essence. "It was lonely and scary, but I just couldn't afford those big-city fears.... I was pursuing my dream of becoming a dancer. So I put my paranoia in my pocket, fought the smelly ol' subway and just kept training."

Frustrated with her poverty wage and with the fact that she was refused black-actress roles because she was too light-skinned, Guy went to Los Angeles to work as a dancer on the television show Fame. That too proved disappointing. "They treated us like scenery," she said of Fame 's producers, "and I knew in my heart I could do better. Besides, I missed the discipline of dance training. So I quit. I tucked my tail between my legs and returned to Ailey. I went from making $750 a week to making $75." Eventually Guy landed small parts in musicals and variety shows such as The Wiz, Bubbling Brown Sugar, and Leader of the Pack. Her touring schedule took her all over Europe and the United States, sometimes leaving her near exhaustion.

Guy's first movie role was in Spike Lee's 1988 film School Daze, about life in an all-black college. Ironically, Guy was cast as a light-skinned black woman who is shunned by her dark-skinned classmates. "The role was difficult for me because it brought back ugly memories," she told People. "Again I had to face the reality of how the world sometimes views people only on outward appearances. I don't like being prejudged." Painful as the role was for her, Guy drew notice for her portrayal of a "Wannabee," the vain, spoiled beauty queen.

Since: Mar 08

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#4 May 4, 2010
interesting
heeeeeeeee

Stone Mountain, GA

#5 Jun 17, 2010
her kids are ugly

Since: Mar 08

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#6 Jun 20, 2010
heeeeeeeee wrote:
her kids are ugly
not true.

“about 2 be a mini me”

Since: Apr 12

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#7 Apr 29, 2012
this happens to a lot of us; you have to forgive and forget ya know : )

Since: Aug 12

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#8 Nov 10, 2012
Black people are probably the most racist against other Blacks.
When I was younger, all my friends were Hispanics, especially Ricans and Dominicans, for the simple reason that for many AAs I was too light to be one of them even though I am not biracial... my parents and grand parents are all light skin Blacks and now people wonder why I tend to go for Black Hispanic women not my own....

“Being a Black Queen in America”

Since: May 12

Location hidden

#9 Nov 19, 2012
Dark or light skin. we all get bullied a lot. thats life in the black community
DSMmom

Tucker, GA

#11 Dec 7, 2012
I can't imagine anyone who feels it necessary to bully anyone. I came across all of this because my daughter is bullied for having interest in African-American young men. She is just in the eighth grade and certainly not "dating" but she "went" to a dance this year with one young man and is now "going out with" another young guy, both of whom are black. She has been called
Some horrific things as a result of this,and from a wide array of
People. Such a shame skin color still matters, but apparently it does.

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