Editorial | It's time to make Kentuck...

Editorial | It's time to make Kentucky smoke-free

There are 4 comments on the The Courier-Journal story from Jan 13, 2013, titled Editorial | It's time to make Kentucky smoke-free. In it, The Courier-Journal reports that:

Let's hope the third try is a charm. Otherwise, Kentuckians will continue to die or become ill from cigarette smoke -- their own and second-hand -- until lawmakers get serious about the matter and take steps to help protect smokers from themselves as well as those exposed to their smoke.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Courier-Journal.

wondering

Farmington, MO

#1 Jan 13, 2013
you say you want to be smoke free, doesnt kentucky grow tobbacco? if so you have to take care of that little problem .
confederate1989

Bowling Green, KY

#2 Jan 14, 2013
They have created a fear that is based on nothing’’
World-renowned pulmonologist, president of the prestigious Research Institute Necker for the last decade, Professor Philippe Even, now retired, tells us that he’s convinced of the absence of harm from passive smoking. A shocking interview.

What do the studies on passive smoking tell us?

PHILIPPE EVEN. There are about a hundred studies on the issue. First surprise: 40% of them claim a total absence of harmful effects of passive smoking on health. The remaining 60% estimate that the cancer risk is multiplied by 0.02 for the most optimistic and by 0.15 for the more pessimistic … compared to a risk multiplied by 10 or 20 for active smoking! It is therefore negligible. Clearly, the harm is either nonexistent, or it is extremely low.

It is an indisputable scientific fact. Anti-tobacco associations report 3 000-6 000 deaths per year in France ...

I am curious to know their sources. No study has ever produced such a result.

Many experts argue that passive smoking is also responsible for cardiovascular disease and other asthma attacks. Not you?

They don’t base it on any solid scientific evidence. Take the case of cardiovascular diseases: the four main causes are obesity, high cholesterol, hypertension and diabetes. To determine whether passive smoking is an aggravating factor, there should be a study on people who have none of these four symptoms. But this was never done. Regarding chronic bronchitis, although the role of active smoking is undeniable, that of passive smoking is yet to be proven. For asthma, it is indeed a contributing factor ... but not greater than pollen!

The purpose of the ban on smoking in public places, however, was to protect non-smokers. It was thus based on nothing?

Absolutely nothing! The psychosis began with the publication of a report by the IARC, International Agency for Research on Cancer, which depends on the WHO (Editor's note: World Health Organization). The report released in 2002 says it is now proven that passive smoking carries serious health risks, but without showing the evidence. Where are the data? What was the methodology? It's everything but a scientific approach. It was creating fear that is not based on anything.

Why would anti-tobacco organizations wave a threat that does not exist?
...

The anti-smoking campaigns and higher cigarette prices having failed, they had to find a new way to lower the number of smokers. By waving the threat of passive smoking, they found a tool that really works: social pressure. In good faith, non-smokers felt in danger and started to stand up against smokers. As a result, passive smoking has become a public health problem, paving the way for the Evin Law and the decree banning smoking in public places. The cause may be good, but I do not think it is good to legislate on a lie. And the worst part is that it does not work: since the entry into force of the decree, cigarette sales are rising again.

Why not speak up earlier?

As a civil servant, dean of the largest medical faculty in France, I was held to confidentiality. If I had deviated from official positions, I would have had to pay the consequences. Today, I am a free man.

Le Parisien
...
Smoke Free Forever

Atlanta, GA

#3 Jan 16, 2013
I live in Maryland and we have been 100% smoke free since 2007. That's over 5 years ago and guess what it works GREAT. It's the norm now and everyone just accepts it. Bars, Restaurants, Casinos, and business is booming bigger and better than ever. The Casinos are packed with people and are taking in Millions every month. Restaurants are cleaner and better than ever. Bars are packed with a whole new clientel and the same old smokers still show up but respect the rights of others to breathe cleaner air.

Smokefree Maryland is such a great success that they'd never go back and allow smoking ever again.
Everyone is happy, the bar owners, restaurant owners, Servers are healthier with less sick time off and getting better tips. It's just a win win for all. Smokers just step outside smoke and step back in not missing a beat.

I really can't believe Kentucky is still stuck in the 1970's. Kentucky needs to get their political leaders to go to Maryland and see for themselves just how well the 100% smokefree really works.

Maryland was a big tobacco grower but today they grow other crops that make more money for them. It isn't rocket science.
Vet

Atlanta, GA

#4 Jan 17, 2013
Smoke Free Forever wrote:
I live in Maryland and we have been 100% smoke free since 2007. That's over 5 years ago and guess what it works GREAT. It's the norm now and everyone just accepts it. Bars, Restaurants, Casinos, and business is booming bigger and better than ever. The Casinos are packed with people and are taking in Millions every month. Restaurants are cleaner and better than ever. Bars are packed with a whole new clientel and the same old smokers still show up but respect the rights of others to breathe cleaner air.
Smokefree Maryland is such a great success that they'd never go back and allow smoking ever again.
Everyone is happy, the bar owners, restaurant owners, Servers are healthier with less sick time off and getting better tips. It's just a win win for all. Smokers just step outside smoke and step back in not missing a beat.
I really can't believe Kentucky is still stuck in the 1970's. Kentucky needs to get their political leaders to go to Maryland and see for themselves just how well the 100% smokefree really works.
Maryland was a big tobacco grower but today they grow other crops that make more money for them. It isn't rocket science.
I'm a retired veteran living in Maryland and I too am so thankful for the strict restrictions. I stopped going 15 years ago because of the smoke. I have been in my local smoke free American Legion and VFW more in the past 5 years than the ever before. More and more vets are coming back now that the smoke is gone. I just couldn't justify going to the smoke filled AL or VFW. My health was more important, but thanks to the Maryland leaders for the strict smoking restrictions I can go and share my war stories with my fellow vets.
Maryland was smart and made the smoking restrictions all exclusive; restaurants, bars, private clubs, casinos, vet clubs, etc. Everyone was on a level playing field and it is great.

I can't believe some states still allow smoking and employees and patrons to be subjected to such a hazardous work environment.

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