Report: Medicaid expansion in Maine would cost $807 million over 10 years

Jan 10, 2014 Full story: Bangor Daily News 9

The first public takeaway from a controversial consultant's report on the effect of expanding Medicaid in Maine as allowed by the federal Affordable Care Act is that it would cost the state an estimated $807 million over the first 10 years, despite promises from the federal government to cover the full cost of the program for three years and no ... (more)

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YaoMan790

Bristol, ME

#1 Jan 10, 2014
I found the report on Medicaid expansion in Maine to be incomplete. The report did not answer the following questions for me.

How much it will cost Maine people to subsidize expanded Medicaid in other States, when the Maine people themselves do not have access to the same coverage.

How much it will cost Maine people on their hospital bills to pay for increase charity care for Medicaid expansion eligible people?

How many very low income people with preexisting medical problems will be helped by expanded Medicaid coverage?

In conclusion, I found the report to be a partisan requested document by some Maine people to serve the body of politics and not the people of Maine.

Maine State Government: Try Again.
Lollypopmike4670

Bristol, ME

#2 Jan 12, 2014
Mainers pay about 9 cents on the dollar off their paychecks in federal taxes to pay for expanded Medicaid in other U.S. States. Mainers also pay some amount of money on their hospital bills to pay for a hospital’s Free Care Program. Who is to blame for this? Your Maine Lawmaker is. Why? These out-of-touch politicians are either unable or unwilling to provide Mainers with expanded Medicaid to end Mainers subsidizing others access to Medicaid when Mainers are being locked out of this coverage. I am sick in tired of this group of state lawmakers that is why my republican state lawmaker has lost my vote in November of 2014.

blueboatpodium29

Bristol, ME

#3 Jan 13, 2014
It is remarkable that with the stroke of a pen and with the press of a nay button that some state legislators and the governor have now open the door to the possibility of a health/economic crisis in Maine. By saying no way to expanded Medicaid under the ACA Act, these elected officials have made it harder for lower income Mainers to afford vaccinations for everything from influenza to the whooping cough. That means less people in Maine are not immunized against illnesses that are communicable and cause epidemics and pandemics. Certain state legislators and the governor do not seem to understand that epidemics and pandemics kill both people and sales. Augusta needs a change in its political atmosphere an atmosphere that is more attentive to the needs of its citizens and less focus on party politics and fear over primary challenges.


Duh

Chicago, IL

#4 Jan 13, 2014
Who cares what it will cost? The taxpayers will pay for it.
Government writes a bill, the people pay the bill.
It's easy to be generous with other people's money.

Since: Nov 08

Location hidden

#5 Jan 14, 2014
YaoMan490

You poor soul.
Maybe I can help.

Q: How much it will cost Maine people to subsidize expanded Medicaid in other States, when the Maine people themselves do not have access to the same coverage.

A: Maine taxpayers will be paying exactly HALF as much for other people to have free health insurance compared to Maine and all other states joining in on Medicaid expansion. Remember, it is Maine IRS taxpayers who would be funding FREE health insurance, for those too poor to pay IRS taxes. Given a choice of paying for Medicaid Expansion in all state, or half the states, clearly half the states is a better deal.

You seem to think those “Maine people” are all one group, when in fact there are two groups, the ones paying the bills, and the ones getting the benefit.“Maine taxpayers” receive no benefit from giving non-taxpaying “Maine people” free health insurance. Zip, Zilch, Zero, benefit.

Q: How much it will cost Maine people on their hospital bills to pay for increase charity care for Medicaid expansion eligible people?
A: Well, we have health insurance, don’t we. If there is a “hidden” charge for charity care, the insurance will pay for it. If we give Medicaid expansion to all eligible people, I know I will be paying for it, even if I never step foot in a hospital.
The majority of hospital bills are paid for by Medicare, Medicaid, and private insurance. Only a small part is written off as charity care. Those who never go to a hospital, will not pay a penny. But with Medicaid Expansion, the taxpayer is guaranteed to get stuck with someone else’s bill.
It does not take a brain surgeon to realize those bills covered by charity care are going to come out of taxpayer’s pockets, one way or another. It will be hidden charges on bills, or taxes. I’ll take my chances, and so will any person with a brain.

Q: How many very low income people with preexisting medical problems will be helped by expanded Medicaid coverage?
A:“Low’ income, and “NO” income. Hundreds of thousands (millions) of ZERO income adults will get Medicaid under Medicaid Expansion.
As a taxpayer, being asked to pay medical bills for other people, I have to say it does not matter to me if the conditions are new or preexisting.
I am sorry, I (representative of taxpayers) cannot afford to pay all medical bills for all people with all possible ailments. Bad things happen to good people, get over it.
Medicaid expansion gives free health insurance to people who never worked, just the kind of person is prone to have substance abuse issues, that cause health problems, and expensive hospital bills.
Medicaid already pays millions of dollars for methadone, and you want to increase that.

Q: In conclusion, I found the report to be a partisan requested document by some Maine people to serve the body of politics and not the people of Maine.

A: Well, as a welfare worker in a state that has accepted Medicaid expansion, as someone who sees first hand the ones benefiting from Medicaid Expansion, I can tell you that the people of Maine should thank their lucky stars they do not have to increase the tax burden caused from those benefiting from Medicaid Expansion.

I certainly know I do not receive any benefit from my tax increase to pay for free health insurance for other people. it dos not matter what state thy live in, but the fewer the better.

If you want to make a humanitarian plea, and say yes, more money out of my pocket to help people who choose to not work is a good thing, have at it, a rebuttal is waiting, give it your best shot.
onestopvoyage21

Bristol, ME

#6 Jan 14, 2014
The low income adult Joe and Jane Citizens of Maine will not be building in any great works of architecture for the enjoyment of all anytime soon or be buying any big ticket items to stimulate the economy with an architect’s salary anytime soon either because they are unable afford to see any doctors to address their medical needs so they can go to college to learn how to be adept in the world of building great artistically pleasing buildings. Unfortunately, their state government feels that the low income adult Joes and Janes of Maine are not worth the time and effort to assist them in their live changing dreams and goals to become architects by giving them Medicaid expansion health insurance coverage under the ACA Act to address their medical needs. What a waste of potential talent and a lost opportunity for Maine and the world.
onestopvoyage21

Bristol, ME

#7 Jan 14, 2014
BeHereNow:

Not all people on basic Medicaid are able to work becuase of their medical problems. Fix their medical problems and some might work to pay taxes.

Since: Nov 08

Location hidden

#8 Jan 15, 2014
onestopvoyage21 wrote:
BeHereNow:
Not all people on basic Medicaid are able to work becuase of their medical problems. Fix their medical problems and some might work to pay taxes.
Yes, of course, no disagreement from me.
What shall we say, 1% will benefit, and become taxpayers? You estimate some number larger? Certainly you have no evidence, conjecture only.
So we shall give 99% free health care, who have not worked, who will not work, so the 1% will benefit.
Oh my, what a waste of resources.

Talk to any eligibility worker, the ones dealing with the Medicaid recipients on a daily basis, ESPECIALLY those getting free medical insurance through Medicaid Expansion. The generous ones will say not 1%, but 10%. One out of ten will go on to be a productive tax payer, best case scenario.
Still a bad investment, by most taxpayer standards.

Remember, nearly all of these people now covered under Medicaid Expansion had free health insurance under the CHIPS program, as children.
Free health insurance beyond high school age. Eighteen years to have any condition diagnosed and treated.

In 2010, before Medicaid Expansion, 21% of all citizens had Medicaid coverage.
http://kff.org/medicaid/state-indicator/medic...

This is what will happen.
Those with no health issues, will use Medicaid to make frequent doctor visits, to establish a "medical history" basis for disability - SSI.
They will ignore medical advice to take preventative actions, to make healthy choices concerning lifestyle.

This is beyond question, just like your suggestion, some will do it, the only unknown is how many.
Considering the population we are dealing with - welfare background - I have no doubt that this group will exceed your group of those with problems to be fixed and " might work to pay taxes".

I am not an uninformed taxpayer making conjectures.
I am an eligibility worker, in a state with Medicaid expansion.

Are you ready for something scary.
An adult on my caseload now has Medicaid with the disability of erectile dysfunction.
He managed to get General Assistance - cash welfare - for a diagnosis of Bi-polar, which gave him a free prescription card, and free meds for his bi-polar condition.
At the next review his bi-polar was under control, but the meds had a side effect of erectile dysfunction - still disabled. Yes, the examining doctor gave him a "not able to work" decision with a primary diagnosis of E.D., secondary of bi-polar under control.

His attempts at being approved for SSI have been unsuccessful so far, but his friends tell him to be persistent. With the full Medicaid, that will be easy.
After talking to his friends he now realizes he has some new "disabilities".

Since: Nov 08

Location hidden

#9 Jan 15, 2014
I remember the 35+ year old woman who wanted to add Medicaid benefits to her food stamps. She did not even want cash - general assistance, since it requires a disability.

I told her she wasn't eligible, no category for her to fit into.

She was at first startled, then recovered and raised her voice to say "I HAVE to be eligible, I never worked a day in my life!"

There is an assumption, by a growing segment of the population, that no work history is a clear indicator of poverty, and welfare benefits to meet all the needs of life.
This belief is not without bases, they have friends, they see it first hand.
A minority group to be sure, but growing on a daily basis.
Medicaid expansion is fertilizer for that group.

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