Special-education lawsuit settled in ...

Special-education lawsuit settled in part Columbus Dispatch Pol...

There are 9 comments on the DispatchPolitics story from Jul 3, 2009, titled Special-education lawsuit settled in part Columbus Dispatch Pol.... In it, DispatchPolitics reports that:

A federal judge gave preliminary approval yesterday to a partial settlement of a lawsuit filed against the state by parents of disabled students.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at DispatchPolitics.

Maven

Massillon, OH

#1 Jul 4, 2009
We (special education teachers) are still waiting on the Feds to "fully fund" IDEA at 40%; as promised in the original iteration of IDEA. We believe that special education as we know it is going to be eradicated, just because of the bottom line. All this talk about school reform, No Child Left BBehind, etc. are leaving behind America's most needy students. However, more jails and prisons are being built who house a significant number of people who cannot read, erite, nor perform math at its most basic level. We are being undermined by big pushes from districts to fully include students with disabilities and by holding them to the same standarts as their non-disabled peers on state test performances. I applaud any parent who is willing to undertake the fight to demand those services that allegedly are already provided under the IDEA. Maybe, someone will wake up!!
Glasnos

Apopka, FL

#2 Jul 4, 2009
Why should special education students get a good education? The real students who will need the education to make a living aren't.
Maven

Massillon, OH

#3 Jul 4, 2009
Glasnos wrote:
Why should special education students get a good education? The real students who will need the education to make a living aren't.
The real students? How would you classify a "real student?" I was not a "real student," however, the teachers that realized that I learned differently, taught me how to use my deficiencies to help me study and retain information. The results: Bachelor of Science; Masters of Education, Master of Arts in Education, five teaching license, passed 3 praxis (national tests) gained 1st runner up in teacher of the year for CEA-O. I'm GLAD i wasn't a real student. I know some real students (like the valedictorian of my senior class, who flucked out twice from OSU)
Glasnos

Apopka, FL

#4 Jul 4, 2009
Maven wrote:
<quoted text>
The real students? How would you classify a "real student?" I was not a "real student," however, the teachers that realized that I learned differently, taught me how to use my deficiencies to help me study and retain information. The results: Bachelor of Science; Masters of Education, Master of Arts in Education, five teaching license, passed 3 praxis (national tests) gained 1st runner up in teacher of the year for CEA-O. I'm GLAD i wasn't a real student. I know some real students (like the valedictorian of my senior class, who flucked out twice from OSU)
Face it ... most "special ed" students will be on disability their entire lives, and "classes" are not much more than day care centers.
In the meantime, we fail to teach children who will only be taken care of by taxpayers if we fail to give them a basic education.
Maven

Massillon, OH

#5 Jul 4, 2009
Maven wrote:
We (special education teachers) are still waiting on the Feds to "fully fund" IDEA at 40%; as promised in the original iteration of IDEA. We believe that special education as we know it is going to be eradicated, just because of the bottom line. All this talk about school reform, No Child Left BBehind, etc. are leaving behind America's most needy students. However, more jails and prisons are being built who house a significant number of people who cannot read, erite, nor perform math at its most basic level. We are being undermined by big pushes from districts to fully include students with disabilities and by holding them to the same standarts as their non-disabled peers on state test performances. I applaud any parent who is willing to undertake the fight to demand those services that allegedly are already provided under the IDEA. Maybe, someone will wake up!!
When you use the word "most," from where do you get your basis of quantification? I am a special eduction teacher, who have students who graduated and are business owners, serve in the armed services, work in hospitals, post-offices to name a few. The students whom you speak of, are those who are severely handicapped. The state of Ohio requires me to teach from the academic content standards; the difference is the way in which the information is presented. Be careful when you use the word "most." If you were a "real student, then, I surmise that you were taught in your "real classes" how to read and interpret data.
Glasnos

Apopka, FL

#6 Jul 4, 2009
Maven wrote:
<quoted text>
When you use the word "most," from where do you get your basis of quantification? I am a special eduction teacher, who have students who graduated and are business owners, serve in the armed services, work in hospitals, post-offices to name a few. The students whom you speak of, are those who are severely handicapped. The state of Ohio requires me to teach from the academic content standards; the difference is the way in which the information is presented. Be careful when you use the word "most." If you were a "real student, then, I surmise that you were taught in your "real classes" how to read and interpret data.
I would assume then, that ADD qualifies for "special education" now?
Maven

Massillon, OH

#7 Jul 4, 2009
No. Most students who have ADD, are "real students." The law that provides regulatory guidance for special education, provides for 13 specific ategories for special education. ADD is not one of them. In order to be educated about IDEA, perhaps you should visit the USDOE website, Office od Special Education Programs (OSEP) and it will give you a much better explanation of what disabilities qualify.
Glasnos

Apopka, FL

#8 Jul 4, 2009
Maven wrote:
No. Most students who have ADD, are "real students." The law that provides regulatory guidance for special education, provides for 13 specific ategories for special education. ADD is not one of them. In order to be educated about IDEA, perhaps you should visit the USDOE website, Office od Special Education Programs (OSEP) and it will give you a much better explanation of what disabilities qualify.
It seems you are less than forthright.

Joint Policy Memorandum on ADD/ADHD - 1991 Memorandum from the U. S. Department of Education; children with ADD/ADHD may be eligible for special education services under several existing categories (including LD, OHI, ED); circumstances under which schools must provide services and supports under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. The Memorandum begins with this statement:
The legal definition of "Other Health Impairment is "having limited strength, vitality, or alertness, including heightened alertness to environmental stimuli, that results in limited alertness with respect to the educational environment, that ... is due to chronic or acute health problems such as ... attention deficit disorder or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ..."

So ... it would seem ADD is eligible for "special education"
Maven

Massillon, OH

#9 Jul 5, 2009
Glasnos wrote:
<quoted text>
It seems you are less than forthright.
Joint Policy Memorandum on ADD/ADHD - 1991 Memorandum from the U. S. Department of Education; children with ADD/ADHD may be eligible for special education services under several existing categories (including LD, OHI, ED); circumstances under which schools must provide services and supports under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act. The Memorandum begins with this statement:
The legal definition of "Other Health Impairment is "having limited strength, vitality, or alertness, including heightened alertness to environmental stimuli, that results in limited alertness with respect to the educational environment, that ... is due to chronic or acute health problems such as ... attention deficit disorder or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder ..."
So ... it would seem ADD is eligible for "special education"
ADD is NOT a categoey. ADD may be a co-morbid condition, or concommitent condition. You are not forthright. ADD is NOT listed in the 13 categoreiws Of eligible disabilities. Read it again. If ADD is so prominent; then the student can be listed under OHI (Other Health Impaired). However, those students usually get re-evaluated as ED. Districts are reticent to grant OHI for ADD only. Check your local district stats; you will see that OHI is a very small percentage. Why is ADD so hard to qualify? Because many ADD students are average to above average in their cognitive functioning. You see, ADD cannot follow the medical model, because you cannot take blood, or gain an empirical manifestation of the condition. One doctor may say a student has ADD; while another doctor may not agree. Check the research before you admonish one who is ABD doctorate in special education policy; who is also a practioner.

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