How the Civil Rights Act of 1964 changed America

Jul 1, 2014 Full story: San Gabriel Valley Tribune 143

When Earl Ofari-Hutchinson watched President Lyndon B. Johnson sign the historic Civil Rights Act on television five decades ago, something inside him stirred.

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“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#1 Jul 2, 2014
The Civil Rights Act of 1964, followed by the Voting Rights Act of 1965, were the outcomes of a courageous freedom Movement waged by my elders at great risk to their very lives.

That Movement and the Civil Rights Act that emanated from it, created a realm of possibility hardly imaginable to generations who preceded the 1960s.
It is the primary reason I do not have to live so confined a life as my father did.
UTB

Atlanta, GA

#2 Jul 2, 2014
Savant wrote:
The Civil Rights Act of 1964, followed by the Voting Rights Act of 1965, were the outcomes of a courageous freedom Movement waged by my elders at great risk to their very lives.
That Movement and the Civil Rights Act that emanated from it, created a realm of possibility hardly imaginable to generations who preceded the 1960s.
It is the primary reason I do not have to live so confined a life as my father did.
Thanks for saying that.

I was one of the protestors back then.

Our high school teachers knew that it was coming, so they did the best to educate us as much as possible. Sometimes I just sadly shake my head, and say, did we go through hell for the crap and excuses that young people are making today? Most have never lived under the conditions of prejudice, and bigotry.
gangsta lean

Washington, DC

#3 Jul 2, 2014
Savant wrote:
The Civil Rights Act of 1964, followed by the Voting Rights Act of 1965, were the outcomes of a courageous freedom Movement waged by my elders at great risk to their very lives.
That Movement and the Civil Rights Act that emanated from it, created a realm of possibility hardly imaginable to generations who preceded the 1960s.
It is the primary reason I do not have to live so confined a life as my father did.
Yours was a great generation. Too bad the younger AA generation of today did not inherit many of your virtues.
Timothy

Norfolk, VA

#4 Jul 2, 2014
Savant wrote:
The Civil Rights Act of 1964, followed by the Voting Rights Act of 1965, were the outcomes of a courageous freedom Movement waged by my elders at great risk to their very lives.
That Movement and the Civil Rights Act that emanated from it, created a realm of possibility hardly imaginable to generations who preceded the 1960s.
It is the primary reason I do not have to live so confined a life as my father did.
I agree with you Brother. Many people shed blood and died for the establishment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to be passed. Human beings stood up against then legalized apartheid and voting rights discrimination. We can never forget the sacrifices made by those of Freedom Summer too. Grassroots activism is a great exercise of strength. Also, one Sister named Jessica Gordon Nembhard has a new book out called,“Collective Courage: A History of African American Cooperative Economic Thought and Practice.” The book talks about cooperative economics in the civil rights movement. She wrote about how many people were involved in that movement or adhered to many of its concepts like Dr. King, the old school Black Panthers, Fannie Lou Hamer, etc. Since, you have talked about this issue; I just want to let you know about a new book written by the Sister. This framework can be used today. That is why it is important for us to still oppose imperialism, to stand up for our economic rights, and to adhere to justice as well.
X-TREME BIAS

Anonymous Proxy

#5 Jul 2, 2014
Nothing has changed since 1964 for the American negroe as they still far from civil & as such they deserve no rights.
Jawga Boy Hehehe

El Monte, CA

#6 Jul 2, 2014
UTB wrote:
<quoted text>
Thanks for saying that.
I was one of the protestors back then.
Our high school teachers knew that it was coming, so they did the best to educate us as much as possible. Sometimes I just sadly shake my head, and say, did we go through hell for the crap and excuses that young people are making today? Most have never lived under the conditions of prejudice, and bigotry.
Hello jawga boy, ya crackkka

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#7 Jul 2, 2014
gangsta lean wrote:
<quoted text>
Yours was a great generation. Too bad the younger AA generation of today did not inherit many of your virtues.
I was a small child at that time. But I had elders, including cousins who were only adolescents, who were down with the struggle. But it was from them that I was educated in ways even more enlightening than my education at university.
UTB

Atlanta, GA

#8 Jul 2, 2014
AFIK, the "Great Society" was a failure.

It was designed to help uplift the poor to a higher plateau.

Instead it failed miserably.

The opportunities were there, but it was administration that screwed up the "Great Society" programs.

Had the program been administrated properly, more people would have benefited.

Instead in many instances, people at the top, were stealing, and getting their family, and friends on the programs, leaving out the poor!

The result, is what you see today.

“My hand is over my crotch.”

Since: Jan 10

It's time to put it to use

#9 Jul 2, 2014
The Civil Rights Act gave rights to everyone, not just blacks. It's important to note that fact.
UTB

Atlanta, GA

#10 Jul 2, 2014
emperorjohn wrote:
The Civil Rights Act gave rights to everyone, not just blacks. It's important to note that fact.
So noted.

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#11 Jul 2, 2014
Timothy wrote:
<quoted text>
I agree with you Brother. Many people shed blood and died for the establishment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to be passed. Human beings stood up against then legalized apartheid and voting rights discrimination. We can never forget the sacrifices made by those of Freedom Summer too. Grassroots activism is a great exercise of strength. Also, one Sister named Jessica Gordon Nembhard has a new book out called,“Collective Courage: A History of African American Cooperative Economic Thought and Practice.” The book talks about cooperative economics in the civil rights movement. She wrote about how many people were involved in that movement or adhered to many of its concepts like Dr. King, the old school Black Panthers, Fannie Lou Hamer, etc. Since, you have talked about this issue; I just want to let you know about a new book written by the Sister. This framework can be used today. That is why it is important for us to still oppose imperialism, to stand up for our economic rights, and to adhere to justice as well.
Th. I actually came a across that book, COLLECTIVE COURAGE, while visiting an old lefty bookstore. Have to wait for pay day to get a copy, however. If you're ever in Baltimore, Md. try to check out a bookstore café called RED EMMAS. Also, look up BLACK CLASSICS PRESS run by Paul Coates, former leader of the Baltimore chapter of the Black Panther Party. You know, my mom started buying the Panther newspaper after Dr. King was murdered. Sometimes she and her more "conscious" church sisters would raise money and even cook stuff for the BPP breakfast program. Now that former Bmore BPP leader has recently gotten out of prison, I'm trying to discuss with him how much of the Panther program might still be useful.
Yes, the Panther, SNCC and others did advocate cooperatives King supported such efforts under the leadership of sister Fannie Lou Hamer. Robert Allen proposed cooperatives as part of the revolutionary process in his book called BLAK AWAKENING IN CAPITALIST AMERICA, and way back in 1940 W.E.B. Du Bois was advocating cooperatives in his book entitled DUSK OF DAWN (in chapter called "The Colored World Within"). This legacy should be continued.

Since: Oct 12

Location hidden

#13 Jul 2, 2014
emperorjohn wrote:
The Civil Rights Act gave rights to everyone, not just blacks. It's important to note that fact.
But also some special treatment for some, which was not how it was sold to the American people.....
UTB

Atlanta, GA

#14 Jul 2, 2014
Raise da Roof S wrote:
<quoted text> The "poor" people abusing the system, sticking it to the man mentality, is what doomed those programs.
This also PROVES what an abysmal failure Socialism is. Also leading to racism.Imho which is right.
Before opening mouth, please engage brain in gear!

http://www.lbjlibrary.org/lyndon-baines-johns...

Reading is fundamental
Fred

Lafayette, LA

#15 Jul 2, 2014
The Cincinnati Riots of 1841 occurred after a long drought had created widespread unemployment in Cincinnati, Ohio,United States. Over a period of several days in September 1841, unemployed whites attacked the blacks, who then fought back. Many blacks were rounded up and held behind a cordon and then moved to the jail. According to the authorities, this was for their own protection. On 1 August 1841, the black leaders held ceremonies to commemorate the Slavery Abolition Act 1833 that abolished slavery in the British West Indies,an action viewed with hostility by many whites. That month the city experienced a drought and heat wave that caused the Ohio River to drop to the lowest waterline yet recorded, making many who depended on the river traffic out of work.

Tensions mounted, with several scuffles between blacks and whites.

On the evening of Tuesday, 31 August, a group of Irishmen got into a fight with some blacks. On Wednesday, the fight resumed. A mob of white men armed with clubs attacked the occupants of a Negro boarding house. The brawl spread to involve the occupants of neighboring houses and lasted for about three quarters of an hour.

Although several people were wounded on both sides, the incident was not reported to the police, and no arrests were made. Another encounter took place on the Thursday, where two white boys were badly injured, apparently with knives.

That day, bands of angry whites were roaming the city. An eyewitness said blacks were "assaulted wherever found in the streets, and with such weapons and violence as to cause death. On September 3 A white mob organized by people from Kentucky assembled in Fifth Street Market, armed with clubs and stones. They marched towards Broadway and Sixth streets, where they wrecked a black-owned confectionary house on Broadway, next to Sycamore. The crowd grew, and ignored calls to disperse from local dignitaries, including the mayor. Advancing to attack the black neighborhood, the mob was met with gunfire and retreated. In several further attacks, people on both sides were wounded and some reported killed. The Negroes advanced courageously, and according to a reporter, fired down the street into the mass of ruffians, causing a hasty retreat. Around one in the morning, a group of whites brought up an iron six-pounder cannon from near the river, which they loaded with boiler punchings and pointed down Sixth street from Broadway. By this time many of the blacks had fled, but fighting continued, with the cannon being fired several times.

About two am, militiamen arrived and managed to end the fighting.The soldiers threw a cordon around several blocks of the black neighborhood, holding those within captive. The militia also rounded up other blacks in the city and marched them to the cordoned-off area, where they were also held captive until they paid bond.
gangsta lean

Washington, DC

#16 Jul 2, 2014
Savant wrote:
<quoted text>
I was a small child at that time. But I had elders, including cousins who were only adolescents, who were down with the struggle. But it was from them that I was educated in ways even more enlightening than my education at university.
What do you attribute the different attitude of today's young AAs to?
UTB

Atlanta, GA

#19 Jul 2, 2014
Cyrus777 wrote:
Yea accomplished nothing but the removal of the black wealth from the black community.
"The philosophy of Black Nationalism involves a re-education program in the Black community in regards to economics. Our people have to be made to see that any time you take your dollar out of your community and spend it in a community where you don’t live, the community where you live will get poorer and poorer, and the community where you spend your money will get richer and richer.
If we own the stores, if we operate the businesses, if we try and establish some industry in our own community, then we’re developing to the position where we are creating employment for our own kind. Once you gain control of the economy of your own community, then you don’t have to picket and boycott and beg some cracker downtown for a job in his business."
-- El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz/Malcolm X, "The Ballot or The Bullet" speech in Cleveland, Ohio on April 3, 1964.
The white owners of certain stores, they didn't want you there, and told you so. Blacks said OK and opened their own stores, then along came integration, and that was that.

I now ask the question:

Should state sanctioned segregation make a return?

That will be the only way blacks will deal with blacks.
Kip

San Francisco, CA

#20 Jul 2, 2014
Cyrus777 wrote:
Yea accomplished nothing but the removal of the black wealth from the black community.
"The philosophy of Black Nationalism involves a re-education program in the Black community in regards to economics. Our people have to be made to see that any time you take your dollar out of your community and spend it in a community where you don’t live, the community where you live will get poorer and poorer, and the community where you spend your money will get richer and richer.
If we own the stores, if we operate the businesses, if we try and establish some industry in our own community, then we’re developing to the position where we are creating employment for our own kind. Once you gain control of the economy of your own community, then you don’t have to picket and boycott and beg some cracker downtown for a job in his business."
-- El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz/Malcolm X, "The Ballot or The Bullet" speech in Cleveland, Ohio on April 3, 1964.
You sound too young, uninformed, and ignorant to appreciate what the Civil Rights Act REALLY stood for.
UTB

Atlanta, GA

#21 Jul 2, 2014
Kip wrote:
<quoted text>
You sound too young, uninformed, and ignorant to appreciate what the Civil Rights Act REALLY stood for.
Malcolm NEVER came South to fight for Black rights, instead he kept his behind "Up North" where it was safe.

I have NO respect for him at all.

“Yes WE Can! Yes we Will!”

Since: Jul 07

Baltimore, Md.

#22 Jul 2, 2014
gangsta lean wrote:
<quoted text>
What do you attribute the different attitude of today's young AAs to?
number of things, including the suppression of Black movements and leadership by COINTELPRO. When conscious leadership had been suppressed that left a culture of jive. Also the dislocation of Black communities by new economic forces. And other things. Maybe a thread on this question would be good.
gangsta lean

Washington, DC

#23 Jul 2, 2014
Savant wrote:
<quoted text>number of things, including the suppression of Black movements and leadership by COINTELPRO. When conscious leadership had been suppressed that left a culture of jive. Also the dislocation of Black communities by new economic forces. And other things. Maybe a thread on this question would be good.
Yes a thread on this would be very informative. Leadership and a sense of direction with meaningful values needs to be restablished. I think an ever growing trend toward materialism and individualism as encouraged by our essentially immoral capitalistc culture has something to do with it.

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