Supreme Court won't hear Planned Parenthood funding case

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The Supreme Court will not disturb a lower court ruling that blocks Indiana's effort to strip Medicaid funds from Planned Parenthood because the organization performs abortions among its medical services. Full Story

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#892 Jun 29, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
Cling to your archaic notions of reality all you want. I find your illogic extremely disturbing. And I refuse to agree with such foolishness. In logic, begging the question is a type of fallacy occurring in deductive reasoning in which the proposition to be proved is assumed implicitly or explicitly in one of the premises. In other words your proposition that on the day you were born, your age was 0, is based on the premise that age begins at birth, which is an assumption that has no scientific merit, and serves no beneficial purpose.
Our existence does not begin with birth. Our existence begins with fertilization. Age begins with existence, and nothing else. An infants gestational age is never 0, an infants calendar age is never 0. Age is only 0 at the beginning of existence, and our existence begins with fertilization. The gestational age, as does the calendar of infants varies with each individual. A premature baby is an infant of less than 37 weeks gestational age on the day the baby is born. The earliest gestational age at which the infant has at least a 50% chance of survival is referred to as the limit of viability. As NICU care has improved over the last 40 years, viability has reduced to infants approximately 24 weeks old on the day they are born, although rare survivors have been documented as early as 21 weeks old on the day they are born.
The gestational age of infants can be measured by looking at the infant's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. Or from the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date. The infant's developmental gestational age may not be the same as the infants calendar age. For example, an infant 36 weeks old at birth may actually have a developmental gestational age of 38 weeks at birth.
Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants? Because gestational age is a rough estimate of or calendar age, that helps obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs. Whereas determining age from birth is inaccurate, and serves no beneficial purpose in helping obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. Birth is just an arbitrary point in our lifespan, and has nothing to do with determining our actual age.
I have stated a fact. You cannot refute it. My position stands.

Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we are born, our age is 0.

Period.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#893 Jun 29, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
I have stated a fact. You cannot refute it. My position stands.
Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we are born, our age is 0.
Period.
You have stated a misnomer not a fact. And as I have said, you have every right to cling to your archaic sense of reality, just like every other mindless drone in this decadent, decaying society.

The gestational age of infants on the day they are born varies with each individual. A premature baby is an infant of less than 37 weeks gestational age on the day the baby is born. The earliest gestational age at which the infant has at least a 50% chance of survival is referred to as the limit of viability. As NICU care has improved over the last 40 years, viability has reduced to infants approximately 24 weeks old on the day they are born, although rare survivors have been documented as early as 21 weeks old on the day they are born.
The gestational age of infants can be measured by looking at the infant's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. Or from the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date. The infant's developmental gestational age may not be the same as the infants calendar age. For example, an infant with a calendar age of 36 weeks at birth may actually have a developmental gestational age of 38 weeks at birth.
Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants? Because gestational age is a rough estimate of or calendar age, that helps obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs. Whereas determining age from birth is inaccurate, and serves no beneficial purpose in helping obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. Birth is just an arbitrary point in our lifespan, and has nothing to do with determining our actual age.

A misnomer is a word or term that suggests a meaning that is known to be wrong. Misnomers often arise because the thing named received its name long before its true nature was known.
Young Earth creationism (YEC) is the belief that our planet and universe were created, from nothing, in six days, approximately 6,000 years ago, by the God of the Abrahamic religions. Adherents of young Earth creationism are known as "young Earth creationists", or simply YECs.
While in reality the best measurement of the age of the universe is 13.798 ± 0.037 billion years (4.354 ± 38,051,750 years ± 1%) within the Lambda-CDM concordance model. Because measurements of the cosmic background radiation give the cooling time of the universe since the Big Bang, and measurements of the expansion rate of the universe can be used to calculate its approximate age by extrapolating backwards in time. And the age of the Earth is 4.54 ± 0.05 billion years (4.54 × 109 years ± 1%). This age is based on evidence from radiometric age dating of meteorite material and is consistent with the ages of the oldest-known terrestrial and lunar samples.

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#894 Jun 29, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
You have stated a misnomer not a fact. And as I have said, you have every right to cling to your archaic sense of reality, just like every other mindless drone in this decadent, decaying society.
The gestational age of infants on the day they are born varies with each individual. A premature baby is an infant of less than 37 weeks gestational age on the day the baby is born. The earliest gestational age at which the infant has at least a 50% chance of survival is referred to as the limit of viability. As NICU care has improved over the last 40 years, viability has reduced to infants approximately 24 weeks old on the day they are born, although rare survivors have been documented as early as 21 weeks old on the day they are born.
The gestational age of infants can be measured by looking at the infant's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. Or from the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date. The infant's developmental gestational age may not be the same as the infants calendar age. For example, an infant with a calendar age of 36 weeks at birth may actually have a developmental gestational age of 38 weeks at birth.
Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants? Because gestational age is a rough estimate of or calendar age, that helps obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs. Whereas determining age from birth is inaccurate, and serves no beneficial purpose in helping obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. Birth is just an arbitrary point in our lifespan, and has nothing to do with determining our actual age.
A misnomer is a word or term that suggests a meaning that is known to be wrong. Misnomers often arise because the thing named received its name long before its true nature was known.
Young Earth creationism (YEC) is the belief that our planet and universe were created, from nothing, in six days, approximately 6,000 years ago, by the God of the Abrahamic religions. Adherents of young Earth creationism are known as "young Earth creationists", or simply YECs.
While in reality the best measurement of the age of the universe is 13.798 ± 0.037 billion years (4.354 ± 38,051,750 years ± 1%) within the Lambda-CDM concordance model. Because measurements of the cosmic background radiation give the cooling time of the universe since the Big Bang, and measurements of the expansion rate of the universe can be used to calculate its approximate age by extrapolating backwards in time. And the age of the Earth is 4.54 ± 0.05 billion years (4.54 × 109 years ± 1%). This age is based on evidence from radiometric age dating of meteorite material and is consistent with the ages of the oldest-known terrestrial and lunar samples.
No, I've stated facts. And none of your long, drawn-out, I suspect half plagiarized posts have proven otherwise.

Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, not 36 weeks. Period.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#895 Jun 29, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
No, I've stated facts. And none of your long, drawn-out, I suspect half plagiarized posts have proven otherwise.
Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, not 36 weeks. Period.
Misnomers are not facts. All you have stated is a misnomer. A misnomer no matter how widely accepted is never a fact, and should never be confused as a fact. And as long, or drawn out as my posts my be, my posts consist of common knowledge, and common knowledge cannot be plagiarized. Furthermore plagiarism never lessons the validity of any fact, and is a useful tool in communication.
Our age begins with our existence and our existence begins with fertilization. The gestational age of an infant is measure from the first day of our mother's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date.
The baby's calendar age is determined from date of fertilization, while the baby's gestational age can be measured by looking at the baby's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. The age of individuals on the day we are born varies from approximately 21 weeks to 45 weeks. On the day we are born, our age is never 0.

I am posting anonymously under a fictitious name which isn't plagiarism at all.
As a general rule, a fact can be said to be 'common knowledge' when:
*it is widely accessible - you may not know the total population of China, but you would be able to find the answer easily from numerous sources.
*it is likely to be known by a lot of people
*it can be found in a general reference resource, such as a dictionary or encyclopedia.
For example:
Pterosaurs were the flying reptiles of the dinosaur age
'Everyone' knows this, so no citation is needed.
You can include such facts in your writing without citation and without fear of committing plagiarism. Other facts that count as common knowledge—for instance, that Franz Boas, the distinguished American ethnologist, held the first academic appointment in anthropology in the United States—are widely known to some groups of people (professional anthropologists) but perhaps not to you. Nevertheless, you would not have to cite the fact about Boas, since it is common knowledge in the sense that no particular individual discovered this information (say, through archival research at Columbia University, where Boas taught).
In other words, even though my data is not known to you. My data is widely known to some groups of people, is widely accessible, and can be found in general reference resources, which makes my data common knowledge, which means my data is not plagiarized.

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#896 Jun 30, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
Misnomers are not facts. All you have stated is a misnomer. A misnomer no matter how widely accepted is never a fact, and should never be confused as a fact. And as long, or drawn out as my posts my be, my posts consist of common knowledge, and common knowledge cannot be plagiarized. Furthermore plagiarism never lessons the validity of any fact, and is a useful tool in communication.
Our age begins with our existence and our existence begins with fertilization. The gestational age of an infant is measure from the first day of our mother's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date.
The baby's calendar age is determined from date of fertilization, while the baby's gestational age can be measured by looking at the baby's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. The age of individuals on the day we are born varies from approximately 21 weeks to 45 weeks. On the day we are born, our age is never 0.
I am posting anonymously under a fictitious name which isn't plagiarism at all.
As a general rule, a fact can be said to be 'common knowledge' when:
*it is widely accessible - you may not know the total population of China, but you would be able to find the answer easily from numerous sources.
*it is likely to be known by a lot of people
*it can be found in a general reference resource, such as a dictionary or encyclopedia.
For example:
Pterosaurs were the flying reptiles of the dinosaur age
'Everyone' knows this, so no citation is needed.
You can include such facts in your writing without citation and without fear of committing plagiarism. Other facts that count as common knowledge—for instance, that Franz Boas, the distinguished American ethnologist, held the first academic appointment in anthropology in the United States—are widely known to some groups of people (professional anthropologists) but perhaps not to you. Nevertheless, you would not have to cite the fact about Boas, since it is common knowledge in the sense that no particular individual discovered this information (say, through archival research at Columbia University, where Boas taught).
In other words, even though my data is not known to you. My data is widely known to some groups of people, is widely accessible, and can be found in general reference resources, which makes my data common knowledge, which means my data is not plagiarized.
Facts are facts. And what I said is a fact. Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we are born, our age is 0, not 36 weeks. Period. And none of your long-winded, I suspect half plagiarized, posts have yet proven otherwise.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#897 Jun 30, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
Facts are facts. And what I said is a fact. Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we are born, our age is 0, not 36 weeks. Period. And none of your long-winded, I suspect half plagiarized, posts have yet proven otherwise.
Whatever you might suspect is "half plagiarized" in no way affects the validity of my progressive arguments, or the stubborn foolishness of your archaic arguments.
Misnomers are not facts. All you have stated is a misnomer. A misnomer no matter how widely accepted is never a fact, and should never be confused as a fact. And as long-winded as my posts might be, my posts consist of common knowledge, and common knowledge cannot be plagiarized. Furthermore plagiarism never lessons the validity of any fact, and is a useful tool in communication.
Our age begins with our existence and our existence begins with fertilization. The gestational age of an infant is measure from the first day its mother's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date.
The baby's calendar age is determined from date of fertilization, while the baby's gestational age can be measured by looking at the baby's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair.
Your proposition that on the day you were born, your age was 0, is based on the premise that age begins at birth, which is an assumption that has no scientific merit. In reality the age of individuals on the day we are born varies from approximately 21 weeks to 45 weeks. On the day we are born, our age is never 0.

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#898 Jun 30, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
Whatever you might suspect is "half plagiarized" in no way affects the validity of my progressive arguments, or the stubborn foolishness of your archaic arguments.
Misnomers are not facts. All you have stated is a misnomer. A misnomer no matter how widely accepted is never a fact, and should never be confused as a fact. And as long-winded as my posts might be, my posts consist of common knowledge, and common knowledge cannot be plagiarized. Furthermore plagiarism never lessons the validity of any fact, and is a useful tool in communication.
Our age begins with our existence and our existence begins with fertilization. The gestational age of an infant is measure from the first day its mother's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date.
The baby's calendar age is determined from date of fertilization, while the baby's gestational age can be measured by looking at the baby's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair.
Your proposition that on the day you were born, your age was 0, is based on the premise that age begins at birth, which is an assumption that has no scientific merit. In reality the age of individuals on the day we are born varies from approximately 21 weeks to 45 weeks. On the day we are born, our age is never 0.
Your misinterpretation of what you've plagiarized, you mean.

And NONE of it refutes my statement. Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, NOT 36 weeks. And "gestational age" refers to the pregnancy, even when estimated after the pregnancy is over. It does not refer to the embryo/fetus/neonate. Period.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#899 Jun 30, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
Your misinterpretation of what you've plagiarized, you mean.
And NONE of it refutes my statement. Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, NOT 36 weeks. And "gestational age" refers to the pregnancy, even when estimated after the pregnancy is over. It does not refer to the embryo/fetus/neonate. Period.
My misinterpretation?
Have you any idea how your notion that the gestational age of an infant does refer to the infant sounds?
Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants? Because gestational age is a rough estimate of our calendar age, that helps obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs. Whereas determining age from birth is archaic, inaccurate, and serves no beneficial purpose. Birth is just an arbitrary point in our lifespan, and has nothing to do with determining our actual age.

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#900 Jun 30, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
My misinterpretation?
Have you any idea how your notion that the gestational age of an infant does refer to the infant sounds?
Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants? Because gestational age is a rough estimate of our calendar age, that helps obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs. Whereas determining age from birth is archaic, inaccurate, and serves no beneficial purpose. Birth is just an arbitrary point in our lifespan, and has nothing to do with determining our actual age.
Yes, your misinterpretation.

You've even misstated what I said in this post. It's not your fault, you don't understand English very well, obviously.

Gestational age refers to the length of the gestation (pregnancy) only. Even if it's estimated/measured after the pregnancy is over to determine things about the neonate. Yes, your misinterpretation. That is a fact.

Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, NOT 36 weeks. That is another fact that the concept of "gestational age" does nothing to refute. Period.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#901 Jun 30, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, your misinterpretation.
You've even misstated what I said in this post. It's not your fault, you don't understand English very well, obviously.
Gestational age refers to the length of the gestation (pregnancy) only. Even if it's estimated/measured after the pregnancy is over to determine things about the neonate. Yes, your misinterpretation. That is a fact.
Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, NOT 36 weeks. That is another fact that the concept of "gestational age" does nothing to refute. Period.
Gestational age relates to the age of an embryo or fetus (or newborn infant).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gestational_age
Gestational age relates to the age of an embryo or fetus (or newborn infant).
https://www.boundless.com/physiology/human-de...
The term “gestational age” should be used instead of “menstrual age” to describe the age of the fetus or newborn infant.
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content...
Gestational age is how old an embryo or fetus is.
http://answers.ask.com/health/reproductive/wh...

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#902 Jun 30, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
Gestational age relates to the age of an embryo or fetus (or newborn infant).
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gestational_age
Gestational age relates to the age of an embryo or fetus (or newborn infant).
https://www.boundless.com/physiology/human-de...
The term “gestational age” should be used instead of “menstrual age” to describe the age of the fetus or newborn infant.
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content...
Gestational age is how old an embryo or fetus is.
http://answers.ask.com/health/reproductive/wh...
I'm sorry you have such a problem with the English language, but you are still misinterpreting what you read.

And ask.com ? Really? Where ordinary people post what they feel like? LOL, you're not very good at this, you know.

The sites with real information there don't refute what I'm saying. I'm sorry, but that's true.

Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.

Gestational age refers to the length of the GESTATION, otherwise known as PREGNANCY.

Those are facts that even your own sources are not refuting, you are just misunderstanding.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#903 Jun 30, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm sorry you have such a problem with the English language, but you are still misinterpreting what you read.
And ask.com ? Really? Where ordinary people post what they feel like? LOL, you're not very good at this, you know.
The sites with real information there don't refute what I'm saying. I'm sorry, but that's true.
Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.
Gestational age refers to the length of the GESTATION, otherwise known as PREGNANCY.
Those are facts that even your own sources are not refuting, you are just misunderstanding.
Gestational age, or the age of the baby, is calculated from the first day of the mother’s last menstrual period. Since the exact date of conception is almost never known, the first day of the last menstrual period is used to measure how old the baby is.
http://americanpregnancy.org/duringpregnancy/...
Gestational age relates to the age of an embryo or fetus (or newborn infant).
https://www.boundless.com/physiology/human-de...
The term “gestational age” should be used instead of “menstrual age” to describe the age of the fetus or newborn infant.
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content...
Two different age metrics are used to describe prenatal development. The first is the post-fertilization age--the time that has passed since fertilization of the egg. The second is the gestational age--the time elapsed since the first day of the mother's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy. Gestational age is approximately two weeks greater than post-fertilization age. Gestational age is often used because its start date can be clearly determined, whereas the moment of fertilization must be inferred.
http://www.livestrong.com/article/92683-embry...
Note: gestational age of the fetus is calculated from the first day of the last menstruation. However, the actual age of the fetus as approximately 2 weeks less (due to the usual date of conception) To make things clearer, the gestational age terminology is usually used.
http://atlases.muni.cz/atlases/feto/atl_en/ma...

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#904 Jul 1, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
Gestational age, or the age of the baby, is calculated from the first day of the mother’s last menstrual period. Since the exact date of conception is almost never known, the first day of the last menstrual period is used to measure how old the baby is.
http://americanpregnancy.org/duringpregnancy/...
Gestational age relates to the age of an embryo or fetus (or newborn infant).
https://www.boundless.com/physiology/human-de...
The term “gestational age” should be used instead of “menstrual age” to describe the age of the fetus or newborn infant.
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content...
Two different age metrics are used to describe prenatal development. The first is the post-fertilization age--the time that has passed since fertilization of the egg. The second is the gestational age--the time elapsed since the first day of the mother's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy. Gestational age is approximately two weeks greater than post-fertilization age. Gestational age is often used because its start date can be clearly determined, whereas the moment of fertilization must be inferred.
http://www.livestrong.com/article/92683-embry...
Note: gestational age of the fetus is calculated from the first day of the last menstruation. However, the actual age of the fetus as approximately 2 weeks less (due to the usual date of conception) To make things clearer, the gestational age terminology is usually used.
http://atlases.muni.cz/atlases/feto/atl_en/ma...
I'm sorry you don't understand.

Gestational age is the length of the pregnancy, even if it's measured after the pregnancy is over.

Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.

And nothing you've posted proves otherwise.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#905 Jul 1, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
I'm sorry you don't understand.
Gestational age is the length of the pregnancy, even if it's measured after the pregnancy is over.
Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.
And nothing you've posted proves otherwise.
Gestational age, or the age of the baby, is calculated from the first day of the mother’s last menstrual period. Since the exact date of conception is almost never known, the first day of the last menstrual period is used to measure how old the baby is.
http://americanpregnancy.org/duringpregnancy/...
Gestational age relates to the age of an embryo or fetus (or newborn infant).
https://www.boundless.com/physiology/human-de...
The term “gestational age” should be used instead of “menstrual age” to describe the age of the fetus or newborn infant.
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content...
Two different age metrics are used to describe prenatal development. The first is the post-fertilization age--the time that has passed since fertilization of the egg. The second is the gestational age--the time elapsed since the first day of the mother's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy. Gestational age is approximately two weeks greater than post-fertilization age. Gestational age is often used because its start date can be clearly determined, whereas the moment of fertilization must be inferred.
http://www.livestrong.com/article/92683-embry...
Note: gestational age of the fetus is calculated from the first day of the last menstruation. However, the actual age of the fetus as approximately 2 weeks less (due to the usual date of conception) To make things clearer, the gestational age terminology is usually used.
http://atlases.muni.cz/atlases/feto/atl_en/ma...

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#906 Jul 1, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
Gestational age, or the age of the baby, is calculated from the first day of the mother’s last menstrual period. Since the exact date of conception is almost never known, the first day of the last menstrual period is used to measure how old the baby is.
http://americanpregnancy.org/duringpregnancy/...
Gestational age relates to the age of an embryo or fetus (or newborn infant).
https://www.boundless.com/physiology/human-de...
The term “gestational age” should be used instead of “menstrual age” to describe the age of the fetus or newborn infant.
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content...
Two different age metrics are used to describe prenatal development. The first is the post-fertilization age--the time that has passed since fertilization of the egg. The second is the gestational age--the time elapsed since the first day of the mother's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy. Gestational age is approximately two weeks greater than post-fertilization age. Gestational age is often used because its start date can be clearly determined, whereas the moment of fertilization must be inferred.
http://www.livestrong.com/article/92683-embry...
Note: gestational age of the fetus is calculated from the first day of the last menstruation. However, the actual age of the fetus as approximately 2 weeks less (due to the usual date of conception) To make things clearer, the gestational age terminology is usually used.
http://atlases.muni.cz/atlases/feto/atl_en/ma...
None of which disproves what I'm saying. You are simply misunderstanding. My points stand.

Gestational age refers to the gestation, otherwise known as PREGNANCY. Even if it is measured after the pregnancy is over and used to determine things about a neonate. It does NOT refer to an embryo/fetus/neonate.

And our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#907 Jul 1, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
None of which disproves what I'm saying. You are simply misunderstanding. My points stand.
Gestational age refers to the gestation, otherwise known as PREGNANCY. Even if it is measured after the pregnancy is over and used to determine things about a neonate. It does NOT refer to an embryo/fetus/neonate.
And our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.
An infant's gestational age is determined by several sources of information.
http://www.pediatrics.emory.edu/divisions/neo...
Gestational age, or the age of the baby, is calculated from the first day of the mother’s last menstrual period. Since the exact date of conception is almost never known, the first day of the last menstrual period is used to measure how old the baby is.
http://americanpregnancy.org/duringpregnancy/...
Gestational age relates to the age of an embryo or fetus (or newborn infant).
https://www.boundless.com/physiology/human-de...
The term “gestational age” should be used instead of “menstrual age” to describe the age of the fetus or newborn infant.
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content...
Two different age metrics are used to describe prenatal development. The first is the post-fertilization age--the time that has passed since fertilization of the egg. The second is the gestational age--the time elapsed since the first day of the mother's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy. Gestational age is approximately two weeks greater than post-fertilization age. Gestational age is often used because its start date can be clearly determined, whereas the moment of fertilization must be inferred.
http://www.livestrong.com/article/92683-embry...
Note: gestational age of the fetus is calculated from the first day of the last menstruation. However, the actual age of the fetus as approximately 2 weeks less (due to the usual date of conception) To make things clearer, the gestational age terminology is usually used.
http://atlases.muni.cz/atlases/feto/atl_en/ma...
A new study out of Sweden has found that using ultrasounds alone to determine the gestational age of a baby girl could cause her to unnecessarily be born post-term, which in some cases can lead to death.
http://www.naturalnews.com/029877_ultrasounds...

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#908 Jul 1, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
An infant's gestational age is determined by several sources of information.
http://www.pediatrics.emory.edu/divisions/neo...
Gestational age, or the age of the baby, is calculated from the first day of the mother’s last menstrual period. Since the exact date of conception is almost never known, the first day of the last menstrual period is used to measure how old the baby is.
http://americanpregnancy.org/duringpregnancy/...
Gestational age relates to the age of an embryo or fetus (or newborn infant).
https://www.boundless.com/physiology/human-de...
The term “gestational age” should be used instead of “menstrual age” to describe the age of the fetus or newborn infant.
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content...
Two different age metrics are used to describe prenatal development. The first is the post-fertilization age--the time that has passed since fertilization of the egg. The second is the gestational age--the time elapsed since the first day of the mother's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy. Gestational age is approximately two weeks greater than post-fertilization age. Gestational age is often used because its start date can be clearly determined, whereas the moment of fertilization must be inferred.
http://www.livestrong.com/article/92683-embry...
Note: gestational age of the fetus is calculated from the first day of the last menstruation. However, the actual age of the fetus as approximately 2 weeks less (due to the usual date of conception) To make things clearer, the gestational age terminology is usually used.
http://atlases.muni.cz/atlases/feto/atl_en/ma...
A new study out of Sweden has found that using ultrasounds alone to determine the gestational age of a baby girl could cause her to unnecessarily be born post-term, which in some cases can lead to death.
http://www.naturalnews.com/029877_ultrasounds...
Yes, I know what they say. It's YOU who is not understanding. None of this disproves my points.

Gestational age refers to the length of the GESTATION, even if it's measured after the GESTATION is over, and used to determine treatment for the neonate. It does NOT refer to the embryo/fetus/neonate.

Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, NOT 36 weeks, even if the GESTATION lasted that long.

Period.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#909 Jul 1, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes, I know what they say. It's YOU who is not understanding. None of this disproves my points.
Gestational age refers to the length of the GESTATION, even if it's measured after the GESTATION is over, and used to determine treatment for the neonate. It does NOT refer to the embryo/fetus/neonate.
Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, NOT 36 weeks, even if the GESTATION lasted that long.
Period.
Gestational age does not refer to the length of gestation. Gestational age calculates the baby's approximate age from the first day of the mother’s last menstrual period before gestation.

An infant's gestational age is determined by several sources of information.
http://www.pediatrics.emory.edu/divisions/neo...
Gestational age, or the age of the baby, is calculated from the first day of the mother’s last menstrual period. Since the exact date of conception is almost never known, the first day of the last menstrual period is used to measure how old the baby is.
http://americanpregnancy.org/duringpregnancy/...
Gestational age relates to the age of an embryo or fetus (or newborn infant).
https://www.boundless.com/physiology/human-de...
The term “gestational age” should be used instead of “menstrual age” to describe the age of the fetus or newborn infant.
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content...
Two different age metrics are used to describe prenatal development. The first is the post-fertilization age--the time that has passed since fertilization of the egg. The second is the gestational age--the time elapsed since the first day of the mother's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy. Gestational age is approximately two weeks greater than post-fertilization age. Gestational age is often used because its start date can be clearly determined, whereas the moment of fertilization must be inferred.
http://www.livestrong.com/article/92683-embry...
Note: gestational age of the fetus is calculated from the first day of the last menstruation. However, the actual age of the fetus as approximately 2 weeks less (due to the usual date of conception) To make things clearer, the gestational age terminology is usually used.
http://atlases.muni.cz/atlases/feto/atl_en/ma...
A new study out of Sweden has found that using ultrasounds alone to determine the gestational age of a baby girl could cause her to unnecessarily be born post-term, which in some cases can lead to death.
http://www.naturalnews.com/029877_ultrasounds...
Definition: Gestational age is the age of a fetus or baby counted from the first day of the mother’s last menstrual period.
http://preemies.about.com/od/glossary/g/GestA...

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#910 Jul 1, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
Gestational age does not refer to the length of gestation. Gestational age calculates the baby's approximate age from the first day of the mother’s last menstrual period before gestation.
An infant's gestational age is determined by several sources of information.
http://www.pediatrics.emory.edu/divisions/neo...
Gestational age, or the age of the baby, is calculated from the first day of the mother’s last menstrual period. Since the exact date of conception is almost never known, the first day of the last menstrual period is used to measure how old the baby is.
http://americanpregnancy.org/duringpregnancy/...
Gestational age relates to the age of an embryo or fetus (or newborn infant).
https://www.boundless.com/physiology/human-de...
The term “gestational age” should be used instead of “menstrual age” to describe the age of the fetus or newborn infant.
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content...
Two different age metrics are used to describe prenatal development. The first is the post-fertilization age--the time that has passed since fertilization of the egg. The second is the gestational age--the time elapsed since the first day of the mother's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy. Gestational age is approximately two weeks greater than post-fertilization age. Gestational age is often used because its start date can be clearly determined, whereas the moment of fertilization must be inferred.
http://www.livestrong.com/article/92683-embry...
Note: gestational age of the fetus is calculated from the first day of the last menstruation. However, the actual age of the fetus as approximately 2 weeks less (due to the usual date of conception) To make things clearer, the gestational age terminology is usually used.
http://atlases.muni.cz/atlases/feto/atl_en/ma...
A new study out of Sweden has found that using ultrasounds alone to determine the gestational age of a baby girl could cause her to unnecessarily be born post-term, which in some cases can lead to death.
http://www.naturalnews.com/029877_ultrasounds...
Definition: Gestational age is the age of a fetus or baby counted from the first day of the mother’s last menstrual period.
http://preemies.about.com/od/glossary/g/GestA...
Repeating it will not change the fact that you are misunderstanding what is being said, none of which disproves what I say.

Gestational age refers to the length of the GESTATION, even when it's measured after gestation is over, and is used to determine treatment for a neonate.

Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#911 Jul 1, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
Repeating it will not change the fact that you are misunderstanding what is being said, none of which disproves what I say.
Gestational age refers to the length of the GESTATION, even when it's measured after gestation is over, and is used to determine treatment for a neonate.
Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day we were born, our age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.
Gestational age begins before gestation, and continues after gestation, which obviously is not the length of gestation. The length of gestation is measured with trimesters. Gestational age is an approximation of the baby's age. Our age begins with fertilization, and neither the gestational age nor the calendar age of infants is ever 0.

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