Supreme Court won't hear Planned Pare...

Supreme Court won't hear Planned Parenthood funding case

There are 854 comments on the CBS News story from May 28, 2013, titled Supreme Court won't hear Planned Parenthood funding case. In it, CBS News reports that:

The Supreme Court will not disturb a lower court ruling that blocks Indiana's effort to strip Medicaid funds from Planned Parenthood because the organization performs abortions among its medical services.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at CBS News.

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#872 Jun 27, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
After birth, gestational age can be measured by looking at the baby's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. The baby's developmental gestational age on the day you were born may not be the same as the baby's calendar age on the day you were born. For example, an infant born at 36 weeks may actually have a developmental gestational age of 38 weeks.
Why is it important to determine gestational age on the day you were born? It helps the obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs.
Nothing in this quote you've plagiarized refutes what I said. Gestational age measures the length of the PREGNANCY, not the age of the fetus. It's not my fault you don't understand English very well.

On the day you were born, your age was 0, not 36 weeks.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#873 Jun 27, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
Nothing in this quote you've plagiarized refutes what I said. Gestational age measures the length of the PREGNANCY, not the age of the fetus. It's not my fault you don't understand English very well.
On the day you were born, your age was 0, not 36 weeks.
What does plagiarism have to do with abortion? Shouldn't you be posting on the plagiarism forum? Besides which I am posting anonymously under a fictitious name which isn't plagiarism at all.
As a general rule, a fact can be said to be 'common knowledge' when:
&#9726;it is widely accessible - you may not know the total population of China, but you would be able to find the answer easily from numerous sources.
&#9726;it is likely to be known by a lot of people
&#9726;it can be found in a general reference resource, such as a dictionary or encyclopedia.
For example:
Pterosaurs were the flying reptiles of the dinosaur age
'Everyone' knows this, so no citation is needed.
You can include such facts in your writing without citation and without fear of committing plagiarism. Other facts that count as common knowledge—for instance, that Franz Boas, the distinguished American ethnologist, held the first academic appointment in anthropology in the United States—are widely known to some groups of people (professional anthropologists) but perhaps not to you. Nevertheless, you would not have to cite the fact about Boas, since it is common knowledge in the sense that no particular individual discovered this information (say, through archival research at Columbia University, where Boas taught).
In other words, even though my data is not known to you. My data is widely known to some groups of people, is widely accessible, and can be found in general reference resources, which makes my data common knowledge, which means my data is not plagiarized.

Gestational age of an infant cannot measure the length of pregnancy, since it is impossible to be pregnant with an infant.
The baby's calendar age is determined from date of fertilization, while the baby's gestational age can be measured by looking at the baby's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair.

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#874 Jun 27, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
What does plagiarism have to do with abortion? Shouldn't you be posting on the plagiarism forum? Besides which I am posting anonymously under a fictitious name which isn't plagiarism at all.
As a general rule, a fact can be said to be 'common knowledge' when:
&#9726;it is widely accessible - you may not know the total population of China, but you would be able to find the answer easily from numerous sources.
&#9726;it is likely to be known by a lot of people
&#9726;it can be found in a general reference resource, such as a dictionary or encyclopedia.
For example:
Pterosaurs were the flying reptiles of the dinosaur age
'Everyone' knows this, so no citation is needed.
You can include such facts in your writing without citation and without fear of committing plagiarism. Other facts that count as common knowledge—for instance, that Franz Boas, the distinguished American ethnologist, held the first academic appointment in anthropology in the United States—are widely known to some groups of people (professional anthropologists) but perhaps not to you. Nevertheless, you would not have to cite the fact about Boas, since it is common knowledge in the sense that no particular individual discovered this information (say, through archival research at Columbia University, where Boas taught).
In other words, even though my data is not known to you. My data is widely known to some groups of people, is widely accessible, and can be found in general reference resources, which makes my data common knowledge, which means my data is not plagiarized.
Gestational age of an infant cannot measure the length of pregnancy, since it is impossible to be pregnant with an infant.
The baby's calendar age is determined from date of fertilization, while the baby's gestational age can be measured by looking at the baby's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair.
Plagiarism has nothing to do with abortion, and I didn't say it did. See, I TOLD you that you can't understand English very well, and you just proved me right.

Determining gestational age after the birth is STILL measuring the timing of the pregnancy, how long the fetus was in the womb. What it is NOT, is the fetus' age. Even when it's judged after birth.

And STILL, you have not refuted my point.

On the day you were born, your age was 0, not 36 weeks. Period.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#875 Jun 27, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
Plagiarism has nothing to do with abortion, and I didn't say it did. See, I TOLD you that you can't understand English very well, and you just proved me right.
Determining gestational age after the birth is STILL measuring the timing of the pregnancy, how long the fetus was in the womb. What it is NOT, is the fetus' age. Even when it's judged after birth.
And STILL, you have not refuted my point.
On the day you were born, your age was 0, not 36 weeks. Period.
I was talking about the gestational age of infants. I said nothing about fetus at all. A fetus is not an infant. An infant is not a fetus.
An infant two weeks after being born, with a gestational age of 34 weeks is not a measurement of pregnancy, it is a measure of the gestational age of the infant. The pregnancy ended at 32 weeks. It is impossible to be pregnant with a baby two weeks after it is born. It is impossible to measure the timing of the pregnancy of someone that is not pregnant. It is impossible to look at the baby's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair while the baby is in the womb.
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
Gestational age of an infant cannot measure the length of pregnancy, since it is impossible to be pregnant with an infant.
The baby's calendar age is determined from date of fertilization, while the baby's gestational age can be measured by looking at the baby's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair.

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#876 Jun 28, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
I was talking about the gestational age of infants. I said nothing about fetus at all. A fetus is not an infant. An infant is not a fetus.
An infant two weeks after being born, with a gestational age of 34 weeks is not a measurement of pregnancy, it is a measure of the gestational age of the infant. The pregnancy ended at 32 weeks. It is impossible to be pregnant with a baby two weeks after it is born. It is impossible to measure the timing of the pregnancy of someone that is not pregnant. It is impossible to look at the baby's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair while the baby is in the womb.
<quoted text>
Infants don't HAVE a "gestational age". That's NOT what that says. It says they were BORN at that point in the pregnancy, not that it's their own age. It is STILL the time measurement of the PREGNANCY. You're saying it yourself.....the infants are TWO WEEKS OLD. THAT is what I mean when I say you don't understand English very well.

Gestational age refers to the PREGNANCY, even if they are referring to it two weeks after it ended.

OUR age begins at birth, not before. On the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks. Period.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#877 Jun 28, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
Infants don't HAVE a "gestational age". That's NOT what that says. It says they were BORN at that point in the pregnancy, not that it's their own age. It is STILL the time measurement of the PREGNANCY. You're saying it yourself.....the infants are TWO WEEKS OLD. THAT is what I mean when I say you don't understand English very well.
Gestational age refers to the PREGNANCY, even if they are referring to it two weeks after it ended.
OUR age begins at birth, not before. On the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks. Period.
Infants do have a gestational age, which is exactly what that says.
Because it is the age of the infant that is important to the proper care of infants, and not their date of birth. Because the exact date of fertilization is impossible to determine, it is impossible to determine the exact calendar age of humans. The gestational age of humans is a rough estimate of the calendar age of humans. Humans can in actuality be up to one month younger than their gestational age, but never older than their gestational age. Gestational age has a direct correlation to the length of pregnancy which is measured with trimesters.
The gestational age of infants can be measured by looking at the infant's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. Or from the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date. The infant's developmental gestational age may not be the same as the infants calendar age. For example, an infant with a calendar age 36 weeks may actually have a developmental gestational age of 38 weeks.
Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants? It helps the obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs.

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#878 Jun 28, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
Infants do have a gestational age, which is exactly what that says.
Because it is the age of the infant that is important to the proper care of infants, and not their date of birth. Because the exact date of fertilization is impossible to determine, it is impossible to determine the exact calendar age of humans. The gestational age of humans is a rough estimate of the calendar age of humans. Humans can in actuality be up to one month younger than their gestational age, but never older than their gestational age. Gestational age has a direct correlation to the length of pregnancy which is measured with trimesters.
The gestational age of infants can be measured by looking at the infant's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. Or from the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date. The infant's developmental gestational age may not be the same as the infants calendar age. For example, an infant with a calendar age 36 weeks may actually have a developmental gestational age of 38 weeks.
Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants? It helps the obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs.
You're still misunderstanding, but I suppose you can't help that. It's not saying what you think/want to pretend it does. And it doesn't refute what I'm saying.

Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#879 Jun 28, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
You're still misunderstanding, but I suppose you can't help that. It's not saying what you think/want to pretend it does. And it doesn't refute what I'm saying.
Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.
The gestational age of infants varies with each individual. A premature baby is an infant of less than 37 weeks gestational age on the day the baby is born. The earliest gestational age at which the infant has at least a 50% chance of survival is referred to as the limit of viability. As NICU care has improved over the last 40 years, viability has reduced to infants approximately 24 weeks old on the day they are born, although rare survivors have been documented as early as 21 weeks old on the day they are born.
The gestational age of infants can be measured by looking at the infant's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. Or from the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date. The infant's developmental gestational age may not be the same as the infants calendar age. For example, an infant with a calendar age of 36 weeks at birth may actually have a developmental gestational age of 38 weeks at birth.
Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants? It helps the obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs.

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#880 Jun 28, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
The gestational age of infants varies with each individual. A premature baby is an infant of less than 37 weeks gestational age on the day the baby is born. The earliest gestational age at which the infant has at least a 50% chance of survival is referred to as the limit of viability. As NICU care has improved over the last 40 years, viability has reduced to infants approximately 24 weeks old on the day they are born, although rare survivors have been documented as early as 21 weeks old on the day they are born.
The gestational age of infants can be measured by looking at the infant's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. Or from the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date. The infant's developmental gestational age may not be the same as the infants calendar age. For example, an infant with a calendar age of 36 weeks at birth may actually have a developmental gestational age of 38 weeks at birth.
Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants? It helps the obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs.
Repeating this will not change the fact that you are misunderstanding what is being said. None of this refutes my statement.

Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#881 Jun 28, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
Repeating this will not change the fact that you are misunderstanding what is being said. None of this refutes my statement.
Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.
The gestational age of infants on the day they are born varies with each individual. A premature baby is an infant of less than 37 weeks gestational age on the day the baby is born. The earliest gestational age at which the infant has at least a 50% chance of survival is referred to as the limit of viability. As NICU care has improved over the last 40 years, viability has reduced to infants approximately 24 weeks old on the day they are born, although rare survivors have been documented as early as 21 weeks old on the day they are born.
The gestational age of infants can be measured by looking at the infant's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. Or from the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date. The infant's developmental gestational age may not be the same as the infants calendar age. For example, an infant with a calendar age of 36 weeks at birth may actually have a developmental gestational age of 38 weeks at birth.
Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants? It helps the obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs.

A misnomer is a word or term that suggests a meaning that is known to be wrong. Misnomers often arise because the thing named received its name long before its true nature was known.
Young Earth creationism (YEC) is the belief that our planet and universe were created, from nothing, in six days, approximately 6,000 years ago, by the God of the Abrahamic religions. Adherents of young Earth creationism are known as "young Earth creationists", or simply YECs.
While in reality the best measurement of the age of the universe is 13.798 ± 0.037 billion years (4.354 ± 38,051,750 years ± 1%) within the Lambda-CDM concordance model. Because measurements of the cosmic background radiation give the cooling time of the universe since the Big Bang, and measurements of the expansion rate of the universe can be used to calculate its approximate age by extrapolating backwards in time. And the age of the Earth is 4.54 ± 0.05 billion years (4.54 × 109 years ± 1%). This age is based on evidence from radiometric age dating of meteorite material and is consistent with the ages of the oldest-known terrestrial and lunar samples.

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#882 Jun 28, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
The gestational age of infants on the day they are born varies with each individual. A premature baby is an infant of less than 37 weeks gestational age on the day the baby is born. The earliest gestational age at which the infant has at least a 50% chance of survival is referred to as the limit of viability. As NICU care has improved over the last 40 years, viability has reduced to infants approximately 24 weeks old on the day they are born, although rare survivors have been documented as early as 21 weeks old on the day they are born.
The gestational age of infants can be measured by looking at the infant's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. Or from the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date. The infant's developmental gestational age may not be the same as the infants calendar age. For example, an infant with a calendar age of 36 weeks at birth may actually have a developmental gestational age of 38 weeks at birth.
Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants? It helps the obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs.
A misnomer is a word or term that suggests a meaning that is known to be wrong. Misnomers often arise because the thing named received its name long before its true nature was known.
Young Earth creationism (YEC) is the belief that our planet and universe were created, from nothing, in six days, approximately 6,000 years ago, by the God of the Abrahamic religions. Adherents of young Earth creationism are known as "young Earth creationists", or simply YECs.
While in reality the best measurement of the age of the universe is 13.798 ± 0.037 billion years (4.354 ± 38,051,750 years ± 1%) within the Lambda-CDM concordance model. Because measurements of the cosmic background radiation give the cooling time of the universe since the Big Bang, and measurements of the expansion rate of the universe can be used to calculate its approximate age by extrapolating backwards in time. And the age of the Earth is 4.54 ± 0.05 billion years (4.54 × 109 years ± 1%). This age is based on evidence from radiometric age dating of meteorite material and is consistent with the ages of the oldest-known terrestrial and lunar samples.
Again, repeating this won't change the fact that you are STILL misunderstanding what is being said, and it doesn't refute what I said. "Gestational" refers to GESTATION, also known as what?.....PREGNANCY. Gestational age, even if estimated after the gestation is over, refers to the timing of the pregnancy, and is not an infants age.

Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks. Period.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#883 Jun 28, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
Again, repeating this won't change the fact that you are STILL misunderstanding what is being said, and it doesn't refute what I said. "Gestational" refers to GESTATION, also known as what?.....PREGNANCY. Gestational age, even if estimated after the gestation is over, refers to the timing of the pregnancy, and is not an infants age.
Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks. Period.
That is a logical fallacy. You are wrong. In logic, begging the question is a type of fallacy occurring in deductive reasoning in which the proposition to be proved is assumed implicitly or explicitly in one of the premises. In other words your proposition that on the day you were born, your age was 0 is based on the premise that age begins at birth, which is an assumption and has no scientific merit.

In reality, our age begins with our existence, as does everything else in the known universe, not later. Our existence begins with fertilization, not birth.
Gestation is the development of the baby in the womb. In human neonatology, gestational age refers to the infants calendar age plus two weeks. Premature babies are always of a younger age on the day they are born than full term babies are on the day they are born, and neither are ever age 0.

Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants on the day you were born? It helps the obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs.

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#884 Jun 28, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
That is a logical fallacy. You are wrong. In logic, begging the question is a type of fallacy occurring in deductive reasoning in which the proposition to be proved is assumed implicitly or explicitly in one of the premises. In other words your proposition that on the day you were born, your age was 0 is based on the premise that age begins at birth, which is an assumption and has no scientific merit.
In reality, our age begins with our existence, as does everything else in the known universe, not later. Our existence begins with fertilization, not birth.
Gestation is the development of the baby in the womb. In human neonatology, gestational age refers to the infants calendar age plus two weeks. Premature babies are always of a younger age on the day they are born than full term babies are on the day they are born, and neither are ever age 0.
Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants on the day you were born? It helps the obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs.
No, it's a fact that on the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks, and that "gestational age" refers to the PREGNANCY, not a fetus, not an infant. Period.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#885 Jun 28, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
No, it's a fact that on the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks, and that "gestational age" refers to the PREGNANCY, not a fetus, not an infant. Period.
No. That is not a fact. That's just your ignorant biased opinion.
Gestational age relates to the age of an embryo, fetus, or newborn infant.
Gestational age of infants is measured by looking at the baby's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. Which does not refer to any pregnancy at all. Period

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#886 Jun 29, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
No. That is not a fact. That's just your ignorant biased opinion.
Gestational age relates to the age of an embryo, fetus, or newborn infant.
Gestational age of infants is measured by looking at the baby's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. Which does not refer to any pregnancy at all. Period
You are wrong. Gestational age refers to the pregnancy, even if estimated after there is no longer a pregnancy. It does not refer to the embryo/fetus or newborn. YOU are wrong.

Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks. Period.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#887 Jun 29, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
You are wrong. Gestational age refers to the pregnancy, even if estimated after there is no longer a pregnancy. It does not refer to the embryo/fetus or newborn. YOU are wrong.
Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks. Period.
Cling to your archaic notions of reality all you want. I find your illogic extremely disturbing. And I refuse to agree with such foolishness. In logic, begging the question is a type of fallacy occurring in deductive reasoning in which the proposition to be proved is assumed implicitly or explicitly in one of the premises. In other words your proposition that on the day you were born, your age was 0, is based on the premise that age begins at birth, which is an assumption that has no scientific merit, and serves no beneficial purpose.

Our existence does not begin with birth. Our existence begins with fertilization. Age begins with existence, and nothing else. An infants gestational age is never 0, an infants calendar age is never 0. Age is only 0 at the beginning of existence, and our existence begins with fertilization. The gestational age, as does the calendar of infants varies with each individual. A premature baby is an infant of less than 37 weeks gestational age on the day the baby is born. The earliest gestational age at which the infant has at least a 50% chance of survival is referred to as the limit of viability. As NICU care has improved over the last 40 years, viability has reduced to infants approximately 24 weeks old on the day they are born, although rare survivors have been documented as early as 21 weeks old on the day they are born.
The gestational age of infants can be measured by looking at the infant's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. Or from the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date. The infant's developmental gestational age may not be the same as the infants calendar age. For example, an infant 36 weeks old at birth may actually have a developmental gestational age of 38 weeks at birth.
Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants? Because gestational age is a rough estimate of or calendar age, that helps obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs. Whereas determining age from birth is inaccurate, and serves no beneficial purpose in helping obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. Birth is just an arbitrary point in our lifespan, and has nothing to do with determining our age.

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#888 Jun 29, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
Cling to your archaic notions of reality all you want. I find your illogic extremely disturbing. And I refuse to agree with such foolishness. In logic, begging the question is a type of fallacy occurring in deductive reasoning in which the proposition to be proved is assumed implicitly or explicitly in one of the premises. In other words your proposition that on the day you were born, your age was 0, is based on the premise that age begins at birth, which is an assumption that has no scientific merit, and serves no beneficial purpose.
Our existence does not begin with birth. Our existence begins with fertilization. Age begins with existence, and nothing else. An infants gestational age is never 0, an infants calendar age is never 0. Age is only 0 at the beginning of existence, and our existence begins with fertilization. The gestational age, as does the calendar of infants varies with each individual. A premature baby is an infant of less than 37 weeks gestational age on the day the baby is born. The earliest gestational age at which the infant has at least a 50% chance of survival is referred to as the limit of viability. As NICU care has improved over the last 40 years, viability has reduced to infants approximately 24 weeks old on the day they are born, although rare survivors have been documented as early as 21 weeks old on the day they are born.
The gestational age of infants can be measured by looking at the infant's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. Or from the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date. The infant's developmental gestational age may not be the same as the infants calendar age. For example, an infant 36 weeks old at birth may actually have a developmental gestational age of 38 weeks at birth.
Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants? Because gestational age is a rough estimate of or calendar age, that helps obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs. Whereas determining age from birth is inaccurate, and serves no beneficial purpose in helping obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. Birth is just an arbitrary point in our lifespan, and has nothing to do with determining our age.
There is nothing "archaic" about it.

Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.

Gestational age refers to the pregnancy (gestation), even when measured after birth occurs. It does not refer to an embryo, a fetus, or a neonate.

Those are both facts.

You are wrong.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#889 Jun 29, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
There is nothing "archaic" about it.
Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.
Gestational age refers to the pregnancy (gestation), even when measured after birth occurs. It does not refer to an embryo, a fetus, or a neonate.
Those are both facts.
You are wrong.
Those are misnomers and misconceptions, not facts.
Gestational age refers to the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy, as it relates to the calendar age of an embryo, a fetus, or a neonate.
The celebration of a birthday usually is thought to mark how old a person is, however in reality, age begins with existence, and our existence begins with fertilization.
Mesopotamia and Egypt, the cradles of civilization, were the first lands in which men remembered and honored their birthdays. The ancient world of Egypt, Greece, Rome, and Persia celebrated the birthdays of gods, kings, and nobles. The keeping of birthday records was important in ancient times principally because a birth date was essential for the casting of a horoscope.
So, there is a direct connection between the Pagan practice of birthday celebrations and astrology, horoscopes, and fortune telling.

“Blessed Be”

Since: Jun 07

Location hidden

#890 Jun 29, 2013
zef wrote:
<quoted text>
Those are misnomers and misconceptions, not facts.
Gestational age refers to the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy, as it relates to the calendar age of an embryo, a fetus, or a neonate.
The celebration of a birthday usually is thought to mark how old a person is, however in reality, age begins with existence, and our existence begins with fertilization.
Mesopotamia and Egypt, the cradles of civilization, were the first lands in which men remembered and honored their birthdays. The ancient world of Egypt, Greece, Rome, and Persia celebrated the birthdays of gods, kings, and nobles. The keeping of birthday records was important in ancient times principally because a birth date was essential for the casting of a horoscope.
So, there is a direct connection between the Pagan practice of birthday celebrations and astrology, horoscopes, and fortune telling.
No, they are facts. And nothing you have posted refutes those facts.

Gestational age refers to the timing of gestation, or PREGNANCY. It does NOT refer to an embryo, fetus, or neonate. Period.

Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.
zef

Los Angeles, CA

#891 Jun 29, 2013
Bitner wrote:
<quoted text>
No, they are facts. And nothing you have posted refutes those facts.
Gestational age refers to the timing of gestation, or PREGNANCY. It does NOT refer to an embryo, fetus, or neonate. Period.
Our age begins at birth, not before. On the day you were born, your age was 0, NOT 36 weeks.
Cling to your archaic notions of reality all you want. I find your illogic extremely disturbing. And I refuse to agree with such foolishness. In logic, begging the question is a type of fallacy occurring in deductive reasoning in which the proposition to be proved is assumed implicitly or explicitly in one of the premises. In other words your proposition that on the day you were born, your age was 0, is based on the premise that age begins at birth, which is an assumption that has no scientific merit, and serves no beneficial purpose.

Our existence does not begin with birth. Our existence begins with fertilization. Age begins with existence, and nothing else. An infants gestational age is never 0, an infants calendar age is never 0. Age is only 0 at the beginning of existence, and our existence begins with fertilization. The gestational age, as does the calendar of infants varies with each individual. A premature baby is an infant of less than 37 weeks gestational age on the day the baby is born. The earliest gestational age at which the infant has at least a 50% chance of survival is referred to as the limit of viability. As NICU care has improved over the last 40 years, viability has reduced to infants approximately 24 weeks old on the day they are born, although rare survivors have been documented as early as 21 weeks old on the day they are born.
The gestational age of infants can be measured by looking at the infant's weight, length, head circumference, vital signs, reflexes, muscle tone, posture, and condition of the skin and hair. Or from the first day of the woman's last menstrual cycle before pregnancy to the current date. The infant's developmental gestational age may not be the same as the infants calendar age. For example, an infant 36 weeks old at birth may actually have a developmental gestational age of 38 weeks at birth.
Why is it important to determine gestational age of infants? Because gestational age is a rough estimate of or calendar age, that helps obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. This can help them anticipate the infant's needs. Whereas determining age from birth is inaccurate, and serves no beneficial purpose in helping obstetricians and neonatologists anticipate what complications an infant might be expected to have. Birth is just an arbitrary point in our lifespan, and has nothing to do with determining our actual age.

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