Area gun sales, fears rising

Nov 14, 2012 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: North Port Sun

Gun stores in Charlotte County have experienced increased sales since Election Day as local gun owners brace for an anticipated restriction of gun laws following the re-election of President Barack Obama.

Comments (Page 247)

Showing posts 4,921 - 4,940 of7,571
|
Go to last page| Jump to page:
xxxrayted

Beachwood, OH

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5278
Feb 15, 2013
 
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>If that's the case, why bothering to hire a professional? It's the realtor's job to represent the selller's interest and to protect their client. If the mortgage broker and the realtor tell the client they can afford more, whose to argue with their experience? After all the buyer's realtor is SUPPOSED to work for the buyer. They get paid by the buyer for their PROFESSIONAL SERVICES, which includes knowing the industry. The same for the mortgage brokers.
If you truly believe these "industry professionals" are blameless, then please go ahead and find the same types of loans that were offered like you're showing. I'd like to see the same types of loans today that were being offered in the past.
You're not going to see that because the rules went in reverse. Today, it's almost impossible for many people to get a loan which they site as one of the reasons housing growth is so slow.

My newest tenant was a neighbor down the street looking high and low for someplace to move. They were living in his sisters house and she got foreclosed on. They claimed they couldn't find a descent rent anywhere. This was before I knew I was going to have a vacant apartment.

So I went online to Craig's list to find them an apartment in their price range. I use Craig's List to find most of my tenants. Low and behold, I couldn't find them one place either. I couldn't believe the change in rentals in just one year. When I advertised my apartments, I am usually competing with dozens of other landlords in the area. Not anymore. It's a landlords market now. Everybody is renting today because they can't get a home loan.
Yeah

Kaneohe, HI

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5279
Feb 15, 2013
 
xxxrayted wrote:
<quoted text>
It's government that pressured banks into giving bad loans. And why not? The banks made their money processing the loan. Then it went to Fanny, Freddy or a number of other wholesale places that shuffled those bad mortgages to Wall Street.
Banks sets their standards for primary loans because it's their money. For sub-prime loans and government assisted loans, government sets the standards.
The way we could have avoided the housing collapse was to let banks set their own standards. After all, you can't bundle bad securities unless you have those bad securities to begin with, and everybody knew those were all bad loans.
lol! Again, it's your word son on something I've shown isn't true. You keep trying to blame people you hold responsible because you think it provides political brownie points.

You keep spewing your opinion as if they're facts... and that's as far as you go.

BTW, some banks DID set their loan standards. With the blessings of the SEC no less. Which is why the big banks got in trouble.

As for the securities, we know BoA and Countrywide knew the loans were bad. That's why they had to buy back the loans and pay a huge penalty.

You really should keep up with the times son.... and the facts!
Yeah

Kaneohe, HI

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5280
Feb 15, 2013
 
xxxrayted wrote:
<quoted text>
Well if you like a cradle to grave government, why don't you move to Cuba, China or North Korea? They have government everything over there. You don't have to worry about a thing. Government makes all your decisions for you.
Because I'm not son.

But if you want no government, have fun in Somalia. In fact, you don't even have to worry about your second amendment rights!
Yeah

Kaneohe, HI

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5281
Feb 15, 2013
 
xxxrayted wrote:
<quoted text>
You're not going to see that because the rules went in reverse. Today, it's almost impossible for many people to get a loan which they site as one of the reasons housing growth is so slow.
My newest tenant was a neighbor down the street looking high and low for someplace to move. They were living in his sisters house and she got foreclosed on. They claimed they couldn't find a descent rent anywhere. This was before I knew I was going to have a vacant apartment.
So I went online to Craig's list to find them an apartment in their price range. I use Craig's List to find most of my tenants. Low and behold, I couldn't find them one place either. I couldn't believe the change in rentals in just one year. When I advertised my apartments, I am usually competing with dozens of other landlords in the area. Not anymore. It's a landlords market now. Everybody is renting today because they can't get a home loan.
That's what I've heard tell as well. Part of the reason was the housing bubble. Part is a more mobile society. And part is due to the slipping salary gap.
Spocko

Oakland, CA

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5282
Feb 15, 2013
 
xxxrayted wrote:
<quoted text>
It is their fault for the most part. I watched our news here and seen the places government closed up and threw the owner or employees in jail where they belong. Guess what? They weren't reputable places. Joe's Barber Shop and Loan isn't the place you trust when larger organizations turned you down.
For most people, a house is the largest purchase you will ever make in your life. If you don't know WTF you're doing, then the responsible thing is to hire people that do. You get your loan and real estate help from reputable places. You hire a lawyer or an accountant to help you figure out the facts such as when you get a loan for 2.95% on an arm, it's not going to go down. It's going to go up. And when it does, what does that mean to you as the person paying the mortgage?
The tear jerking stories I've seen on the news made me shake my head. The working people who got caught in all this had no idea what happens when their interest rate doubled. Some didn't even know they were on an adjustable mortgage loan. They never read any of the paperwork because they didn't understand it. They just signed their name to the dozens of forms and got their house. That's all they wanted to know about it at the time.
If what you're saying is true, yes it would be their fault! I would find it hard to feel empathy for anyone looking for a mortgage professional at Joe's Barber Shop. On the other hand, clearly, the barber shop brokers were not trying to help they were taking advantage of the law and the clients! Real-estate and Mortgage professionals are licensed by the State and these people are showing blatantly unprofessional conduct.
xxxrayted

Beachwood, OH

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5283
Feb 15, 2013
 
Spocko wrote:
<quoted text>
If what you're saying is true, yes it would be their fault! I would find it hard to feel empathy for anyone looking for a mortgage professional at Joe's Barber Shop. On the other hand, clearly, the barber shop brokers were not trying to help they were taking advantage of the law and the clients! Real-estate and Mortgage professionals are licensed by the State and these people are showing blatantly unprofessional conduct.
That's what I mean by reputable places. Those round-the-corner places were the places authorities went to first to nab the bad guys. In fact, Cleveland was featured in a 60 minutes episode about a year ago. The Mayor of Cleveland called azz on the shisters who were involved in all this. Many people rightfully went to jail. Good for them.

If standards were high enough at the time, none of those people would have got screwed either by the salesmen or their ignorance. Lower income people seen stars in their eyes. The very idea of finally owning your own home and getting off of rent. The American dream. Little did they know they were getting setup for a good screwing.

Both of my tenants who purchased their homes with 0% down later regretted it. We stay in touch and they frequently say "We should have listened to you." But they thought I was acting in my own best interests by telling them the faults of their home purchases. Both now have homes under water and there is little that can be done. They have to keep them until the market finally gets back to normal, and even then they will take a loss.
xxxrayted

Beachwood, OH

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5284
Feb 15, 2013
 
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>That's what I've heard tell as well. Part of the reason was the housing bubble. Part is a more mobile society. And part is due to the slipping salary gap.
Only a small part. What the banks are looking for now is outstanding credit and 20% down. Few can come up with that record or downpayment. Some who were involved in the crash told me they would never buy a home again under any circumstance.

My personal experience is that single women are looking to get out of home ownership. Very few have the skills to upkeep the house they live in. They are always looking for help from family or friends, or hiring professionals to get work done. You can go broke that way.

My sister has a beautiful house in a development. It's quality built because my father built it for her when she was married. She's been single for the last decade or so, and can't upkeep the house in spite of help from myself or my father. She just wants to get out. Her desire is to purchase a townhouse where they have a maintenance agreement that covers inside and out.

Right now, the only major purchasers of homes are landlords. Since the rental market is on fire, they are purchasing single homes to rent to families that have a tough time squeezing into an apartment. They can buy houses cheap enough to charge a decent amount for rent. When the market recovers, they are going to sell these houses and make a profit for themselves.
xxxrayted

Beachwood, OH

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5285
Feb 15, 2013
 
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>Because I'm not son.
But if you want no government, have fun in Somalia. In fact, you don't even have to worry about your second amendment rights!
There is a thick line between no government and limited government. Just because you want very limited government doesn't mean you want no government. In fact, you would be hard-pressed to find a conservative that believes in no government. The no government people are usually Libertarians.

If conservatives believed in no government, we wouldn't be Constitutionalists. The Constitution is a document that has government, but very limited government. When it comes to government, I would be happy following the founders Constitution.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5286
Feb 15, 2013
 
xxxrayted wrote:
<quoted text>
There is a thick line between no government and limited government. Just because you want very limited government doesn't mean you want no government. In fact, you would be hard-pressed to find a conservative that believes in no government. The no government people are usually Libertarians.
If conservatives believed in no government, we wouldn't be Constitutionalists. The Constitution is a document that has government, but very limited government. When it comes to government, I would be happy following the founders Constitution.
your exactly right you wont find a moderen Conservative that believes in no government and in favor of a Plutocracy but still favor some form of Socialism Vs Capitalism which rejects our form of Constitutional Government here in the US.
xxxrayted

Beachwood, OH

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5287
Feb 15, 2013
 
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>lol! Again, it's your word son on something I've shown isn't true. You keep trying to blame people you hold responsible because you think it provides political brownie points.
You keep spewing your opinion as if they're facts... and that's as far as you go.
BTW, some banks DID set their loan standards. With the blessings of the SEC no less. Which is why the big banks got in trouble.
As for the securities, we know BoA and Countrywide knew the loans were bad. That's why they had to buy back the loans and pay a huge penalty.
You really should keep up with the times son.... and the facts!
The facts are that everybody knew those loans were bad. How? Because government created the parameters for such loans, that's how. All those loans that went to the secondary market all had paperwork for anybody to see. After they were bundled, investors depended on the rating those loans had. They didn't see the paperwork because it would take months to years to sort through all of it, so they depended on the credit rating like they always have. They got screwed. It was pass-the-buck.

You are correct that not all banks went along for the ride. Here in Cleveland, there was a small banking outfit called Fifth-third. They resisted all the temptation of those money making paperwork deals. Instead, they continued to make mortgages as usual. They told ACORN and Piglosi to go screw themselves. They came out like a rose in the end.

“Si vis pacem, para bellum !!”

Since: Dec 07

Southeast Virginia

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5288
Feb 15, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

xxxrayted wrote:
<quoted text>
You're not going to see that because the rules went in reverse. Today, it's almost impossible for many people to get a loan which they site as one of the reasons housing growth is so slow.
My newest tenant was a neighbor down the street looking high and low for someplace to move. They were living in his sisters house and she got foreclosed on. They claimed they couldn't find a descent rent anywhere. This was before I knew I was going to have a vacant apartment.
So I went online to Craig's list to find them an apartment in their price range. I use Craig's List to find most of my tenants. Low and behold, I couldn't find them one place either. I couldn't believe the change in rentals in just one year. When I advertised my apartments, I am usually competing with dozens of other landlords in the area. Not anymore. It's a landlords market now. Everybody is renting today because they can't get a home loan.
And that is mainly because these people that are asking for sky high rents are the ones that bought there houses at the peak just before the bubble burst. They are now upside down on their loans and they can't sell there houses, and they can't afford to stay in them. Just like my neighbor across the street. He lost his job here, and found a new one in New Orleans (notice I live in VA). His house is only a few hundred square feet bigger than mine but his mortgage is almost double what mine is because he decided to pull the equity out for whatever reason. For the first year he was gone, he rented the house for a little over half of what his mortgage is taking over a $900 loss every month. That family moved out after a year, and now that house has been vacant since the end of August because they are now trying to sell it instead of renting it out again.

The housing bubble was mainly caused by people's GREED and impatience. Keeping up with the Jones's and buying as much house as they could qualify for without any regard for what would they could really afford. just like the morons who go out and buy a car they think they can afford if they just give up this or that without ever thinking about what happens if it breaks down or needs maintenance, tires, etc. Financial irresponsibility.

“Si vis pacem, para bellum !!”

Since: Dec 07

Southeast Virginia

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5289
Feb 15, 2013
 

Judged:

1

1

Spocko wrote:
<quoted text>
You live in very simple world where everything is black and white and absurdly simplistic! Comparing a real estate/mortgage transaction to -- "Kind of like a woman claiming "so-and-so got me pregnant" -- is beyond stupid, it is nothing short of retarded! There are very serious reasons why we seek professional help to navigate, negotiate and perform complex business transactions or medical procedures. Most mortgage brokers in the country will not touch a questionable client, it is only a few bad apples that put profits before "due diligence." To claim that the individual seeking professional help is to blame is remarkably illogical, something one would get from FAUX News ...
The only thing stupid here is your post above. I can see that personal responsibility is completely foreign to you also. If the buyer gets taken advantage of because of their own naivety or ignorance, who is ultimately responsible?? Just like a girl who ends up pregnant (not raped). Who is ultimately responsible for what happens to her body??? Get it yet, moron?
xxxrayted

Beachwood, OH

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5291
Feb 15, 2013
 
Armed Veteran wrote:
<quoted text>
And that is mainly because these people that are asking for sky high rents are the ones that bought there houses at the peak just before the bubble burst. They are now upside down on their loans and they can't sell there houses, and they can't afford to stay in them. Just like my neighbor across the street. He lost his job here, and found a new one in New Orleans (notice I live in VA). His house is only a few hundred square feet bigger than mine but his mortgage is almost double what mine is because he decided to pull the equity out for whatever reason. For the first year he was gone, he rented the house for a little over half of what his mortgage is taking over a $900 loss every month. That family moved out after a year, and now that house has been vacant since the end of August because they are now trying to sell it instead of renting it out again.
The housing bubble was mainly caused by people's GREED and impatience. Keeping up with the Jones's and buying as much house as they could qualify for without any regard for what would they could really afford. just like the morons who go out and buy a car they think they can afford if they just give up this or that without ever thinking about what happens if it breaks down or needs maintenance, tires, etc. Financial irresponsibility.
What really happened is that these people bought houses and were faced with foreclosure or renting them out. This really screwed us landlords because then, everybody was a landlord. As such, when there is too much supply and not enough demand, prices go down.

So they moved out to live with family or friends, and in desperation, they rented out their home. Rental prices are based on what your competition is charging. During that time, I had to drop my rates as well. So regardless what your mortgage is, you can only get so much money for your house.

Because of that, I think these novice landlords still lost their azz. They may have delayed it for a while, but eventually, they still couldn't keep up with mortgage payments and increasing property taxes. Either that or they got lucky and were able to sell the home for a price that got them out of hot water.

In any event, those people are out of the landlord business, and that's good for me. Now I have a choice of who I rent to instead of settling for the bottom of the barrel.
Yeah

Mililani, HI

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5292
Feb 15, 2013
 
xxxrayted wrote:
<quoted text>
Only a small part. What the banks are looking for now is outstanding credit and 20% down. Few can come up with that record or downpayment. Some who were involved in the crash told me they would never buy a home again under any circumstance.
My personal experience is that single women are looking to get out of home ownership. Very few have the skills to upkeep the house they live in. They are always looking for help from family or friends, or hiring professionals to get work done. You can go broke that way.
My sister has a beautiful house in a development. It's quality built because my father built it for her when she was married. She's been single for the last decade or so, and can't upkeep the house in spite of help from myself or my father. She just wants to get out. Her desire is to purchase a townhouse where they have a maintenance agreement that covers inside and out.
Right now, the only major purchasers of homes are landlords. Since the rental market is on fire, they are purchasing single homes to rent to families that have a tough time squeezing into an apartment. They can buy houses cheap enough to charge a decent amount for rent. When the market recovers, they are going to sell these houses and make a profit for themselves.
I hear Nevada has more houses than people to rent to.
Yeah

Mililani, HI

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5293
Feb 15, 2013
 
xxxrayted wrote:
<quoted text>
There is a thick line between no government and limited government. Just because you want very limited government doesn't mean you want no government. In fact, you would be hard-pressed to find a conservative that believes in no government. The no government people are usually Libertarians.
If conservatives believed in no government, we wouldn't be Constitutionalists. The Constitution is a document that has government, but very limited government. When it comes to government, I would be happy following the founders Constitution.
What you're looking for is selective government.

Again, Somalia is the best option to create that utopia. What you want in America is the ability to interpret what you want.
Yeah

Mililani, HI

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5294
Feb 15, 2013
 
Anonymous of Indy wrote:
<quoted text>your exactly right you wont find a moderen Conservative that believes in no government and in favor of a Plutocracy but still favor some form of Socialism Vs Capitalism which rejects our form of Constitutional Government here in the US.
This is why the only way to get closer to true conservatism is to interpret the Constitution in ways that swing the door that direction.

Then again, that's what everyone is trying to do.
Yeah

Mililani, HI

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5295
Feb 15, 2013
 
xxxrayted wrote:
<quoted text>
The facts are that everybody knew those loans were bad. How? Because government created the parameters for such loans, that's how. All those loans that went to the secondary market all had paperwork for anybody to see. After they were bundled, investors depended on the rating those loans had. They didn't see the paperwork because it would take months to years to sort through all of it, so they depended on the credit rating like they always have. They got screwed. It was pass-the-buck.
You are correct that not all banks went along for the ride. Here in Cleveland, there was a small banking outfit called Fifth-third. They resisted all the temptation of those money making paperwork deals. Instead, they continued to make mortgages as usual. They told ACORN and Piglosi to go screw themselves. They came out like a rose in the end.
You keep insisting that government did something when they actually didn't do anything... in fact, they reduced regulations.

You keep injecting your opinion in deference to the facts only because it makes your political point.

Banks like FITB are those like Merrill, BoA and Citi wanted to buy badly because their books were clean, they had good cash flow and they had a strong capital ratio that offset those institutions that decided to get greedy and couldn't raise enough money to cover the outstanding loans.

Government didn't make them greedy, capitalism did. So please, blame the right people for the crime.
Yeah

Mililani, HI

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5296
Feb 15, 2013
 
Armed Veteran wrote:
<quoted text>
And that is mainly because these people that are asking for sky high rents are the ones that bought there houses at the peak just before the bubble burst. They are now upside down on their loans and they can't sell there houses, and they can't afford to stay in them. Just like my neighbor across the street. He lost his job here, and found a new one in New Orleans (notice I live in VA). His house is only a few hundred square feet bigger than mine but his mortgage is almost double what mine is because he decided to pull the equity out for whatever reason. For the first year he was gone, he rented the house for a little over half of what his mortgage is taking over a $900 loss every month. That family moved out after a year, and now that house has been vacant since the end of August because they are now trying to sell it instead of renting it out again.
The housing bubble was mainly caused by people's GREED and impatience. Keeping up with the Jones's and buying as much house as they could qualify for without any regard for what would they could really afford. just like the morons who go out and buy a car they think they can afford if they just give up this or that without ever thinking about what happens if it breaks down or needs maintenance, tires, etc. Financial irresponsibility.
Yep. Realtors and mortgage brokers were irresponsible.
Yeah

Mililani, HI

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5297
Feb 15, 2013
 
Armed Veteran wrote:
<quoted text>
The only thing stupid here is your post above. I can see that personal responsibility is completely foreign to you also. If the buyer gets taken advantage of because of their own naivety or ignorance, who is ultimately responsible?? Just like a girl who ends up pregnant (not raped). Who is ultimately responsible for what happens to her body??? Get it yet, moron?
That's what you pay your realtor for.

Since: Aug 11

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5298
Feb 15, 2013
 
Yeah wrote:
<quoted text>This is why the only way to get closer to true conservatism is to interpret the Constitution in ways that swing the door that direction.
Then again, that's what everyone is trying to do.
True.

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

Showing posts 4,921 - 4,940 of7,571
|
Go to last page| Jump to page:
Type in your comments below
Name
(appears on your post)
Comments
Characters left: 4000
Type the numbers you see in the image on the right:

Please note by clicking on "Post Comment" you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

•••
•••
Enter and win $5000
•••
•••