Pilot of Plane That Dropped A-Bomb Dies

Pilot of Plane That Dropped A-Bomb Dies

There are 21 comments on the The Spokesman-Review story from Nov 1, 2007, titled Pilot of Plane That Dropped A-Bomb Dies. In it, The Spokesman-Review reports that:

“I knew when I got the assignment it was going to be an emotional thing”

Paul Tibbets, the pilot and commander of the B-29 that dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima, Japan, died Thursday. via The Spokesman-Review

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Spokesman-Review.

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marko

Bedford, TX

#1 Nov 1, 2007
IF I WAS THIS MAN..I WOULD BE PRAYING DAY AND NIGHT TO ALMIGHTY GOD FOR THE BLOOD GUILT HE CARRIES ON HIS SHOULDERS FOR DROPPING THAT BOMB..ALL THE INNOCENT LIVES DESTROYED,CITIZENS..

Since: Sep 07

Olathe

#2 Nov 1, 2007
marko wrote:
IF I WAS THIS MAN..I WOULD BE PRAYING DAY AND NIGHT TO ALMIGHTY GOD FOR THE BLOOD GUILT HE CARRIES ON HIS SHOULDERS FOR DROPPING THAT BOMB..ALL THE INNOCENT LIVES DESTROYED,CITIZENS..
Oh please. You need to refamiliarize yourself with history if you think what he did was bad..
xpdog

Middlefield, CT

#4 Nov 1, 2007
marko wrote:
IF I WAS THIS MAN..I WOULD BE PRAYING DAY AND NIGHT TO ALMIGHTY GOD FOR THE BLOOD GUILT HE CARRIES ON HIS SHOULDERS FOR DROPPING THAT BOMB..ALL THE INNOCENT LIVES DESTROYED,CITIZENS..
Hey Marko ever hear of the Bataan death march, or how about Pearl Harbor--not to mention the vivisection's of captured U.S. airmen! Are you smarter than a 5th grader? NOT!
frankie

AOL

#5 Nov 1, 2007
Murder is murder is muder.
Lots of burn't up people, waiting for along time, to say hello.
Danniboy

Melbourne, Australia

#6 Nov 1, 2007
Radars Wife wrote:
<quoted text>
Oh please. You need to refamiliarize yourself with history if you think what he did was bad..
Well it does pay to revisit history - to really understand why it was dropped and to assess whether it was necessary.

In those few months before the bombs were dropped, it was widely acknowledged that Japan had no capacity to continue the war - Iwo Jima had fallen, the invasion of Okinawa was an assured success, Tokyo was in ruins, Japan had been cut off from it's mainland supply lines and the plans for the invasion of Kyushu and the destruction of Japan's last major industrial zone in Honshu were solid.

Moreso, it was well known that Japan was looking for a way to end the war without the shame of unconditional surrender - which they feared would mean the extinction of their very culture (and history shows it did to some degree).

Even the US intelligence experts suggested the Japanese would listen to terms, and radio transmission intercepted by the Soviets gave evidence they would.

But terms and timing of an offer couldn't be agreed upon within the US administration. And some thought the Japanese would hold out unreasonably, attempt to blackmail if you will (regardless of what the intelligence said). Still others supported dropping the bomb to demonstrate US might and to 'end' all war for all time by using the most powerful weapon imaginable and infer the threat that it would be used to annihilate warring parties in future.

The leadership of the US considered that military elements were still in control of Japan and decided a decisive military strike, without warning, would be necessary to change their mind. 2/3 of the people on the wepon project supported a warning first - dropping a bomb on an uninhabited location or isolated military target. But there were great fears that a bomb dropped from a plane wouldn't work - it had never been tried before - and what use is that as a warning (one again might question what the point of dropping it on a city is if it might not work).

In the last days the US called on the Japanese to surrender. They did not indicate what would happen if the call was not heeded. The Japanese did not reply. The US took this to mean they would not - unfortunately they were unaware the Japanese were waiting for Stalin to return from the Potsdam conference on 6 August and respond to preliminary negotiations. As the Japanese foreign minister said on 2 August 1945, the day the Potsdam conference concluded, we cannot afford a single day if 'we are to end the war before the assault on our mainland'. He was right.

The bombs were dropped on 3 August 1945.
Danniboy

Melbourne, Australia

#7 Nov 1, 2007
What I outline above is not to condemn the dropping of the bombs. My personal opinion is such an action is never necessary - it is far too indiscriminate to be an acceptable tool against ones enemies.

But humanity was dealing with the likely greatest crisis it had ever faced. Japan was at that time an intractible, brutal enemy and it is likely negotiations would have taken time - with no guarantee of success or assurance hostilities would cease in the meantime.

I feel the objective evidence suggests it was not necessary, and that considerations that should not have been taken into account - such as the demonstration of the US as the first nuclear power and the wish by some to be the party to end the war, without Soviet help (as would have been required for the invasion plan and as General Chennault said would end the war even without the bomb)- were a factor in the decision.

But I am not in a position to recreate those moments, so I can't truly judge it. The US made a call, it could go either way. I personally think it went the wrong way but it was a call they made.

Regardless, I think it is an event that should be remembered and mourned by all - completely apart from whether it was necessary. It was a hugely destructive act and such an act should never be celebrated. Even if it is a necessity, causing death on such a scale is a loss of innocence and moral standing for a nation. We should mourn for both the dead and those who felt driven to such a killing and learn the lesson that it MAY not have been necessary and it should never, ever happen again. Not to stop a war and DEFINITELY never for revenge.
Austex

Austin, TX

#8 Nov 1, 2007
There were elements of the Japanese Army that attempted to stop the surrender. A coup was attempted that failed.

Estimates of casualties after an invasion on Japan mainland were in the millions.

Rest In Peace Col. Tibbets. He did his job and followed orders.
leo from shanghai

United States

#9 Nov 2, 2007
AL-JEEZERA reporting suspected syrian nuclear site hit by U.S. plane using tactical nuclear weapons, possibly first nuclear strike since NAGASAKI! THANK YOU COL. TIBBETS
Adheeb

Trenton, NJ

#10 Nov 2, 2007
Marko, Frankie, Danniboy & Leo, you all have a future in politics.
The Liberal way

Boynton Beach, FL

#11 Nov 2, 2007
marko wrote:
IF I WAS THIS MAN..I WOULD BE PRAYING DAY AND NIGHT TO ALMIGHTY GOD FOR THE BLOOD GUILT HE CARRIES ON HIS SHOULDERS FOR DROPPING THAT BOMB..ALL THE INNOCENT LIVES DESTROYED,CITIZENS..
Then, since extreme left regimes murdered over 100,000,000 people over the last 80 years, supporters of leftist ideology should be praying twice as hard. And the leftist casualties don't even include war victims.
traveler

Helsinki, Finland

#12 Nov 2, 2007
it's the government to have been butchers.
about the killings of innocents most people don't care, they are dead inside.

“BILLARY 2016 ”

Since: Aug 07

Location hidden

#13 Nov 2, 2007
He was following orders. Just like my dad who guarded the bomb, prior to it's detonation. My father also passed away earlier this year. He and the other soldiers didn't have a clue as to what this bomb could do. They were kept in the dark by the leadership, and for good reason. If they knew what was in their hands, following orders would have been far more difficult.

Whether we saved more lives by dropping it than not dropping it, no one will ever know. What is known is that we apologized for it after we realized what horrors we brought to the people of Japan. The Japanese people weren't responsible for Pearl Harbor but they paid the ultimate price for a horrible decision made by their greedy, moronic leaders.

Sound familiar??????????

Since: Jul 07

New York City

#14 Nov 2, 2007
Danniboy wrote:
What I outline above is not to condemn the dropping of the bombs. My personal opinion is such an action is never necessary - it is far too indiscriminate to be an acceptable tool against ones enemies.
But humanity was dealing with the likely greatest crisis it had ever faced. Japan was at that time an intractible, brutal enemy and it is likely negotiations would have taken time - with no guarantee of success or assurance hostilities would cease in the meantime.
I feel the objective evidence suggests it was not necessary, and that considerations that should not have been taken into account - such as the demonstration of the US as the first nuclear power and the wish by some to be the party to end the war, without Soviet help (as would have been required for the invasion plan and as General Chennault said would end the war even without the bomb)- were a factor in the decision.
But I am not in a position to recreate those moments, so I can't truly judge it. The US made a call, it could go either way. I personally think it went the wrong way but it was a call they made.
Regardless, I think it is an event that should be remembered and mourned by all - completely apart from whether it was necessary. It was a hugely destructive act and such an act should never be celebrated. Even if it is a necessity, causing death on such a scale is a loss of innocence and moral standing for a nation. We should mourn for both the dead and those who felt driven to such a killing and learn the lesson that it MAY not have been necessary and it should never, ever happen again. Not to stop a war and DEFINITELY never for revenge.
Unfortunately, your command of the history of WWII is pretty poor. The plans of the Japanese military would have ensured the death of millions of Japanese as well as tens, if not hundreds of thousands of Americans to end the war by invasion. Why don't you find out what you're talking about?

Since: Jul 07

New York City

#15 Nov 2, 2007
One more thing. The Marines lost 5,000 men and the Navy 50,000 stopping the Japanese at Guadalcanal to save Australia's sorry hides from the Japanese. If it wasn't for the US you'd be speaking Japanese and licking their officers' boots, you little twit.

Since: Jun 07

NY born and raised

#16 Nov 3, 2007
This guy was a hero and will always be remembered as one, I just wish he dropped a few more bombs on those f---s.
Danniboy

Melbourne, Australia

#17 Nov 4, 2007
DrRichard wrote:
<quoted text>
Unfortunately, your command of the history of WWII is pretty poor. The plans of the Japanese military would have ensured the death of millions of Japanese as well as tens, if not hundreds of thousands of Americans to end the war by invasion. Why don't you find out what you're talking about?
And, as posted above, elements of the US command, including the Admiral in charge of all US navy forces, were of the opinion the Japanese could have been defeated without land invasion.

As posted above, the Japanese were already sounding out options for ending the conflict.

The land invasion option was exactly that, an option. One of several.

The point of the post above (and the greater part of the existing analysis) is that dropping the bombs MAY not have been necessary, that we should learn this lesson, and that regardless of the neccessity of it, we should mourn the atomic destruction of two cities, not celebrate it. Nor, in my opinion, should we lionise those who did it. We should not condemn them for doing a job that was incredibly harsh, was considered, by some, to be necessary and MAY even have been necessary, but nor should we ever 'hero-ise' the killing hundreds of thousands of non-combatants.

They were men. They did a job. Let us acknowledge their sacrifice in killing a hundred thousands, acknowledge the deaths of those hundred thousands make sure no one is ever ordered, or chooses, to do such a job again.

Since: Jul 07

New York City

#18 Nov 5, 2007
Danniboy wrote:
<quoted text>
And, as posted above, elements of the US command, including the Admiral in charge of all US navy forces, were of the opinion the Japanese could have been defeated without land invasion.
As posted above, the Japanese were already sounding out options for ending the conflict.
The land invasion option was exactly that, an option. One of several.
The point of the post above (and the greater part of the existing analysis) is that dropping the bombs MAY not have been necessary, that we should learn this lesson, and that regardless of the neccessity of it, we should mourn the atomic destruction of two cities, not celebrate it. Nor, in my opinion, should we lionise those who did it. We should not condemn them for doing a job that was incredibly harsh, was considered, by some, to be necessary and MAY even have been necessary, but nor should we ever 'hero-ise' the killing hundreds of thousands of non-combatants.
They were men. They did a job. Let us acknowledge their sacrifice in killing a hundred thousands, acknowledge the deaths of those hundred thousands make sure no one is ever ordered, or chooses, to do such a job again.
You have a selective sense of history - probably by reading a bunch of historical revisionists. The Japanese Army, not the Emperor, was in control of Japan. A few diplomats and Naval officers, with essentially no power wanted to talk peace. The Emperor would not even back them up until the bombs fell. It wasn't until that happened that he felt he had enough power to oppose the war without himself being killed. The Japanese Army plan for the mainland was the same as for Okanawa - Defend to the last and die in battle and let no civilians surrender. Only the commander of US Submarine Force Pacific felt he could choke off Japan and he did not have any thing to say about strategic planning - he was just an administrative officer. In fact, the submarine and air blockade had already cut off all supply, even in the Sea of Japan, and Japan still had no intention of surrendering. Therefore, his strategy was demonstratably worng and no one with any authority bought into it. It was certianly not the intention of the United States to wait out Japan. Men and material were already being assembled for that invasion. Troops in Europe were being shipped to the Pacific. The invasion would have gone forward in had the bombs failed. The plans had already been drawn for a series of phased invasions.
The problem is that an ungrateful imbicle like yourself can make up any story they want. Go puke in your beer and mind Australia's own business.
Danniboy

Melbourne, Australia

#19 Nov 7, 2007
Alleged Doctor.

First, you'll note I have not once condemned the viewpoint you obviously have such passionate devotion to nor have I once felt it necessary to wade into insults.

Secondly, as I have repeatedly posted, the bulk of analysis on the dropping of bombs raises the question of whether it was necessary. I have never said the analysis said it WASN'T necessary, merely that it raises a question. So do not attempt to reject my words as either made up or personal opinion.

But then the question was raised DURING THE WAR whether it was necessary to drop the bomb. Do you claim the man in charge of ALL US naval forces is an ungrateful imbecile? The man trusted to run the entire US navy – I hope to cheeses that you do not denigrate this person merely because he holds an opinion different to your own. Your country considered him worthy of commanding the greatest naval fleet on earth, I think his opinions on military matters should be accorded significant weight.

Was it necessary? Well, the Japanese had showed they wouldn’t give unconditional surrender. But you know, there are things you can demand that fall short of unconditional surrender. But the Japanese evidenced that they were preparing defences to hold out until they could demand a better deal – which would cause even more deaths if invasion was delayed. Well, they had also approached other parties to the war – the ones not demanding unconditional surrender it may be noted – exactly to discuss cessation of hostilities. The Japanese would never surrender without an execution of horrendous proportions to shock them into capitulation. Well, 2/3 of the people involved in the project recommended a demonstration, or at least a warning that atomic bombs were about to be launched. How about obliterating Tokyo harbour – as was suggested. No, you might say, the sheer power of a bomb would not impress the intractable Japanese, only the deaths of over 100,000 of their civilians. Well, over 100,000 civilians were killed in the firebombing of Tokyo with no political effect – so there’s no logical basis for thinking that it was the deaths the bombs caused that

As you can see, there were arguments for and against and there still are. My posts pass no judgement on which take the day, it happened 60 years ago and my only thought is mourn for the people dead and those who did the killing. Do not glorify the killing of 20,000 Japanese soldiers at the cost of 100,000 civilians.

And please do accuse me of ingratitude simply for encouraging people to truly consider the necessity of nuclear exchange. For the US assistance that prevented the Japanese establishing a hold on the North Eastern ¼ of my continent my country I and those in my country who remember it are grateful – but that assistance had been provided and the Japanese turned back from our shores long before the US made the unilateral decision to drop nuclear weapons on Hiroshima and Nagasaki.
Danniboy

Melbourne, Australia

#20 Nov 7, 2007
I should clarify, my posts pass judgement in the form of my personal belief that nuclear exchange is never necessary, although I took care to say this is only my personal view on atomics and not a judgement on those who dropped the bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As I have said previously, we are not in a position to make that call because we simply do not have the information or the sense of urgency of those who made the call.
HILLBIIIY ROBHIM SMITH

United States

#21 Nov 26, 2007
Danniboy wrote:
I should clarify, my posts pass judgement in the form of my personal belief that nuclear exchange is never necessary, although I took care to say this is only my personal view on atomics and not a judgement on those who dropped the bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As I have said previously, we are not in a position to make that call because we simply do not have the information or the sense of urgency of those who made the call.
Dropping this one bomb saved 2 million Japanese lives. And it left a suttle message to the Chinese and Russians.

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