U.N.: Iran Enriching More, Closing Doors

U.N.: Iran Enriching More, Closing Doors

There are 16 comments on the KTVT Fort Worth story from May 24, 2007, titled U.N.: Iran Enriching More, Closing Doors. In it, KTVT Fort Worth reports that:

“The agency ... remains unable to make further progress in its efforts to verify certain aspects relevant to the scope of nature of Iran's nuclear program.”

PERSIAN GULF Iran continues to defy U.N. Security Council demands to scrap its uranium enrichment program and has instead expanded its activities, the International Atomic Energy Agency said Wednesday, in a ... via KTVT Fort Worth

Join the discussion below, or Read more at KTVT Fort Worth.

THE MENACE

Courtland, CA

#1 May 24, 2007
WHEN IRAN HAS ITS CHERNOBLE, IT WILL BLAME THE U.S. FOR NOT STOPING THEM IN THERE QUEST FOR STARDUMB.
Beavermeister

United States

#2 May 24, 2007
Ok- from what I have read on these posts there are a lot of people who think we should lay off Iran with the Military exercises.

Iran is a bully in the area of Iraq and we need to make sure they know we will kick their ass if they take their nuclear program too far.

We already have the CIA and NSA and State Dept working against them to make sure they know they do not want to engage us in low level warfare.

Iran has a pretty modern military and they have diesel submarines that are a threat to our carrier groups. Be assured we have "several" attack submarines that are tailing Iranian subs 24-7. Our military probably feels that the Subs are the greatest threat from Iran and be assured they are on it. I am sure we have NSA sub microphones covertly placed in Iranian harbors. The average person has no idea how deep we are in preparing to attack Iran.

The task force dog and pony shows this week are just a way to show them how bad we can hammer Tehran if we decide to. Remember, the navy has little to do in Iraq and we seem to be saving them in case we need to hit Iran. Again be assured if we have to hit Iraq the Navy will do most of the heavy lifting.

Should we attack Iran? A good question, it reminds me if we should attack Laos during the Vietnam War which we eventually did in the early 1970's. The similarities of this war and Vietnam are becoming more common every day this war continues.

If we end up hitting Iran you will get no tears here. We need to keep them in check somehow and the big navy cock show seems to be designed to do that.

“Loud Pipes For All!”

Since: Mar 07

Voorhees, NJ

#3 May 25, 2007
Maybe Iran will be dumb enough to accidentally nuke themselves, and/or Iraq. or experience a Mideast Tjernobyl. That would solve everything.
Asamat

Auckland, New Zealand

#4 May 25, 2007
Here we go again,only the yank's and their allie's are allowed "Nuclear program's".
Any country not willing to bow down and bend over must be a rogue nation.It's the same ol propaganda crap the world has been fed about Russsia.The staging of 9/11 to invade other country's for their oil.Absolutely criminal.
Pity the masse's are too scared and brainwashed, believing in the next "terrorist" threat more like false flag's.
Lonewolf

Leesville, SC

#5 May 25, 2007
Iran is building nuclear weapons,so is North Korea,along with several other countries.Truth is,there's not alot we can do about it.It's best we keep our troops home protecting our borders/freedom and keep our foreign aid to ourselves rather than give billions to countries that in a few years will turn on us.

“First take log out of own eye ”

Since: Jan 07

Defender of Islamic Iran

#6 May 25, 2007
Iran has no intentions of wasting their money on a nuclear weapon as they are a smart government and fully understand the MAD doctrine of mutual destruction. The Iranian government has stated clearly their nuclear intentions and a fatwa has been placed against nuclear weapons.
Iran has complied fully with the IAEA and worked well within their international rights under the NPT treaty.

Iran has large indigenous uranium supplies and plans to enter the international fuel market.
Ahmadinejad has promise to reduce the costs of enriched uranium on the world market drastically reducing nuclear power costs for developing counties.

“First take log out of own eye ”

Since: Jan 07

Defender of Islamic Iran

#7 May 26, 2007
Iran has no intentions of wasting their money on a nuclear weapon as they are a smart government and fully understand the MAD doctrine of mutual destruction. The Iranian government has stated clearly their nuclear intentions and a fatwa has been placed against nuclear weapons.
Iran has complied fully with the IAEA and worked well within their international rights under the NPT treaty.

The IAEA said that Iran would not be able to produce the highly enriched uranium needed for a nuclear bomb as long as it remained under the supervision of IAEA inspectors.

Iran has large indigenous uranium supplies and plans to enter the international fuel market.
Ahmadinejad has promise to reduce the costs of enriched uranium on the world market drastically reducing nuclear power costs for developing counties.
Beavermeister

Boca Raton, FL

#9 May 26, 2007
Quotes from Saddam Hussein before Gulf war 2

"What remains for Bush and his accomplices in crime is to understand that they are personally responsible for their crime. The Iraqi people will pursue them for this crime, even if they leave office and disappear into oblivion. There is no doubt they will understand what we mean if they know what revenge means to the Arabs."
(Saddam Hussein is talking about President Bush, Sr.)

One of the lessons of recent and distant history is that all empires and bearers of the coffin of evil, whenever they mobilized their evil against the Arab nation, or against the Muslim world, they were themselves buried in their own coffin, with their sick dreams and their arrogance and greed, under Arab and Islamic soil; or they returned to die on the land from which they had proceeded to perpetrate aggression. This has been the case with all empires preceeding our present time.
Global Warming is the sun

Labelle, FL

#10 May 27, 2007
B-1B Lancer
The B-1B is a multi-role, long-range bomber, capable of flying intercontinental missions without refueling, then penetrating present and predicted sophisticated enemy defenses. It can perform a variety of missions, including that of a conventional weapons carrier for theater operations. Through 1991, the B-1 was dedicated to the nuclear deterrence role as part of the single integrated operational plan (SIOP)

The B-1B's electronic jamming equipment, infrared countermeasures, radar location and warning systems complement its low-radar cross-section and form an integrated defense system for the aircraft.

The swing-wing design and turbofan engines not only provide greater range and high speed at low levels but they also enhance the bomber's survivability. Wing sweep at the full-forward position allows a short takeoff roll and a fast base-escape profile for airfields under attack. Once airborne, the wings are positioned for maximum cruise distance or high-speed penetration. The B-1B holds several world records for speed, payload and distance. The National Aeronautic Association recognized the B-1B for completing one of the 10 most memorable record flights for 1994.

The B-1B uses radar and inertial navigation equipment enabling aircrews to globally navigate, update mission profiles and target coordinates in-flight, and precision bomb without the need for ground based navigation aids. Included in the B-1B offensive avionics are modular electronics that allow maintenance personnel to precisely identify technical difficulties and replace avionics components in a fast, efficient manner on the ground.

The aircraft's AN/ALQ 161A defensive avionics is a comprehensive electronic counter-measures package that detects and counters enemy radar threats. It also has the capability to detect and counter missiles attacking from the rear. It defends the aircraft by applying the appropriate counter-measures, such as electronic jamming or dispensing expendable chaff and flares. Similar to the offensive avionics, the defensive suite has a re-programmable design that allows in-flight changes to be made to counter new or changing threats.

The B-1B represents a major upgrade in U.S. long-range capabilities over the B-52 -- the previous mainstay of the bomber fleet.
Global Warming is the sun

Labelle, FL

#12 May 27, 2007
B-2 SPIRIT




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• B-2 SPIRIT


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Mission
The B-2 Spirit is a multi-role bomber capable of delivering both conventional and nuclear munitions. A dramatic leap forward in technology, the bomber represents a major milestone in the U.S. bomber modernization program. The B-2 brings massive firepower to bear, in a short time, anywhere on the globe through previously impenetrable defenses.

Features
Along with the B-52 and B-1B, the B-2 provides the penetrating flexibility and effectiveness inherent in manned bombers. Its low-observable, or "stealth," characteristics give it the unique ability to penetrate an enemy's most sophisticated defenses and threaten its most valued, and heavily defended, targets. Its capability to penetrate air defenses and threaten effective retaliation provides a strong, effective deterrent and combat force well into the 21st century.

The revolutionary blending of low-observable technologies with high aerodynamic efficiency and large payload gives the B-2 important advantages over existing bombers. Its low-observability provides it greater freedom of action at high altitudes, thus increasing its range and a better field of view for the aircraft's sensors. Its unrefueled range is approximately 6,000 nautical miles (9,600 kilometers).

The B-2's low observability is derived from a combination of reduced infrared, acoustic, electromagnetic, visual and radar signatures. These signatures make it difficult for the sophisticated defensive systems to detect, track and engage the B-2. Many aspects of the low-observability process remain classified; however, the B-2's composite materials, special coatings and flying-wing design all contribute to its "stealthiness."

The B-2 has a crew of two pilots, a pilot in the left seat and mission commander in the right, compared to the B-1B's crew of four and the B-52's crew of five.
Global Warming is the sun

Labelle, FL

#13 May 27, 2007
Background
The first B-2 was publicly displayed on Nov. 22, 1988, when it was rolled out of its hangar at Air Force Plant 42, Palmdale, Calif. Its first flight was July 17, 1989. The B-2 Combined Test Force, Air Force Flight Test Center, Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., is responsible for flight testing the engineering, manufacturing and development aircraft on the B-2.

Whiteman AFB, Mo., is the only operational base for the B-2. The first aircraft, Spirit of Missouri, was delivered Dec. 17, 1993. Depot maintenance responsibility for the B-2 is performed by Air Force contractor support and is managed at the Oklahoma City Air Logistics Center at Tinker AFB, Okla.

The combat effectiveness of the B-2 was proved in Operation Allied Force, where it was responsible for destroying 33 percent of all Serbian targets in the first eight weeks, by flying nonstop to Kosovo from its home base in Missouri and back. In support of Operation Enduring Freedom, the B-2 flew one of its longest missions to date from Whiteman to Afghanistan and back. The B-2 completed its first-ever combat deployment in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom, flying 22 sorties from a forward operating location as well as 27 sorties from Whiteman AFB and releasing more than 1.5 million pounds of munitions. The B-2’s proven combat performance led to declaration of full operational capability in December 2003.
Global Warming is the sun

Labelle, FL

#14 May 27, 2007
Keep it coming, love! Keep it coming, love!
Don't stop it now, don't stop it, no, don't stop it now, don't stop!
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Don't let your well run dry, don't stop it now.
Don't give me no reasons why, don't stop it now!
Keep it coming, love! Keep it coming, love!
Don't stop it now, don't stop it, no, don't stop it now, don't stop!
Keep it coming, love! Keep it coming, love!
Don't stop it now, don't stop it, no, don't stop it now, don't stop it!
Don't build me up just to let me drop, don't stop it now!
Don't turn me on just to turn me off, don't stop it now!
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Don't stop it now, don't stop it, no, don't stop it now, don't stop!
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Don't turn me down and just close your door, don't stop it now!
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Don't stop it now, don't stop it, no, don't stop it now, don't stop!
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Don't stop it now, don't stop it, no, don't stop it now, don't stop it!

Keep It Coming Love Song Lyrics
Global Warming is the sun

Labelle, FL

#15 May 27, 2007
The B-52 Bomber

On the ground, the Boeing B-52 has all the elegance of a Mack truck. As it lumbers toward the runway, its long wings struggling with the weight of eight engines, fuel, and often a deadly cargo of bombs or missiles, observers might feel safe placing bets that the plane will never leave the ground. But, accompanied by the roar of its massive engines, the plane gathers speed and pushes off the ground. And airborne, it acquires the elegance of a bird, soaring freely overhead.



And it is an old bird. A half century after first entering service, the Boeing B-52 Stratofortress, nicknamed BUFF (Big Ugly Fat Fellow) by aircrews, is being flown by a new generation of pilots, young enough to be the grandchildren of the original pilots and often younger than the planes they are flying. Originally expected to serve for merely a decade, the B-52 remains the backbone strategic bombing plane for the U.S. Air Force (USAF) and is often still the first weapon sent against a combatant nation. This is a rather impressive record for a plane whose development program was canceled four times.



The program that resulted in the B-52 began in 1946. The Boeing B-29 that had dropped the atomic bombs on Japan in 1945 had already been replaced by the Boeing B-50. In 1947, the next generation of intercontinental strategic weapons delivery aircraft was ushered in with the deliveries of the Convair B-36, the biggest bomber ever to serve with the USAF, and the jet-engined Boeing B-47. But air force planners already knew that technological developments would make these bombers obsolete quickly. In January 1946, they sent out requirements for a new bomber that could fly at a top speed of 450 miles per hour (724 kilometers per hour), with a service ceiling of at least 40,000 feet (12,192 meters) and a range of more than 5,000 miles (8,047 kilometers) carrying 10,000 pounds (4,536 kilograms) of bombs. Proposals were received by military planebuilders Boeing, Consolidated Vultee, and Martin. The Boeing entry, a design named Model 462, which was powered by six turboprop engines, came out ahead and was given further funding with instructions to make it a faster plane.

Global Warming is the sun

Labelle, FL

#16 May 27, 2007
Using advances in technology, the Boeing engineers swept the wings back at a 20-degree angle. Based on the success of the B-47’s jet engines, they replaced the turboprops with similar jet engines. In-flight refueling capabilities, one of the first, were added. On a Friday afternoon in October 1948, a group of engineers presented the plan to an officer at Wright Field in Ohio. He viewed it and ordered them to "give it more speed." The engineers returned to their hotel and spent the weekend improving the model. On Monday they emerged with Model 464-28, now nicknamed the Stratofortress. The wings were given a 35-degree sweep, and two more engines were added. The air force authorized Boeing to build two prototypes, the XB-52 and the YB-52.
The YB-52 was completed in November 1951. But rather than the normal festivities that accompany such events, the air force demanded top secrecy. When the plane was wheeled out of the plant, they demanded it be covered with muslin (although it is hard to imagine what it could be mistaken for), test flights had to be done at night, and all negatives of photos taken had to be developed at a secure location in Washington, D.C. Although these measures now seem extreme and almost paranoid, they reflected the times, when Cold War enemy Russia would have given anything for some of the B-52’s technology. Finally, more reasonable heads prevailed and restrictions on the B-52 were lifted after several days.
The plane took its first flight on April 15, 1952. The huge plane had a 48-foot (five-story)(15-meter) dorsal fin and its wings had an area of 4,000 square feet (372 square meters). As test pilot Tex Johnson fired up the engines that, according to a reporter, sounded like a "piercing cry," the watching crowd was worried that the test would fail. But for nearly three hours, the plane performed admirably, and its first test was a success, as were subsequent tests. The air force ordered more B-52s.
The first B-52As were delivered to the Strategic Air Command in 1954 where they became the primary airplane of the command. And while crews were training on the plane to protect the country at a moment’s notice, Boeing engineers remained busy improving the plane. In subsequent models, engines were changed, radar and electronic systems updated, and in the mid-1960s, the silver planes began to be painted in camouflage patterns. On the G-model, the dorsal fin was shortened and the gunner, originally positioned in a separate compartment in the rear, was moved to the front cabin with the rest of the crew. Advanced Capability Terrain
Global Warming is the sun

Labelle, FL

#17 May 27, 2007
Avoidance Radar (ACR) was added to allow the plane to fly close to the ground at 300 feet (91 meters), avoiding surface-to-air (SAM) missiles. Changes in the wing structure strengthened it. Each wing could now support a GAM-77 Hound Dog, the first Air Launched Cruise Missile (ALCM), which often held a nuclear warhead and weighed about 10,000 pounds (4,536 kilograms) each. Varying changes to the bomb bays and wings increased the plane’s carrying ability from either 27 conventional bombs or one 43,000-pound (19,504-kilogram) nuclear weapon to all types of bombs and missiles such as gravity bombs, cluster bombs, precision guided missiles, Short-Range Attack Missiles (SRAM), advanced cruise missiles, and many more. These changes allowed the BUFF’s life to extend far beyond the predicted decade.



In addition to delivering conventional and nuclear weapons, the B-52 has found other roles. It is used for ocean surveillance: two B-52s can monitor a 140,000-square-mile (364,000-square-kilometer) section of ocean in two hours, helping the navy in anti-ship and mine-laying operations. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration owns a B-52 that has served as an airborne launch vehicle for test flight for projects such as the X-15, lifting bodies, rocket boosters, the X-38 crew return vehicle and other elements of the agency’s aeronautics and space programs.



After a decade of preparing for strategic bombing campaigns with nuclear weapons, the B-52 finally first went to war in 1965 in Vietnam, as part of Operation Arc Light. This campaign carried out tactical carpet bombing of South Vietnam, an assignment for which the plane was not equipped and the crews were not trained; consequently, the results were not good. Finally, in December 1972, the strategic skills of the B-52 were unleashed over North Vietnam for eleven days in a successful attempt to force North Vietnam to negotiate peace terms. Although the mission was a success, 15 B-52s were lost to SAMs. They could not be replaced since production of the B-52 had ended when the last one, an H-model, had rolled off the assembly line in 1962.



The Cold War ended in 1991, but the B-52 remained in service. The Strategic Air Command was disestablished in 1992 and its B-52s transferred to the Air Combat Command (ACC). The B-52 was used during the Gulf War in 1991, delivering 40 percent of all weapons dropped on Iraq by the United States and its allies. It flew over Iraq again in 1996 during Operation Desert Strike and in 2001 over Afghanistan during the war against terrorism.



An engineering study in the year 2001 predicted that the B-52 would be flying for the air force into the year 2045, almost a century after its development began. It has outlived not only its predecessors but also many of its successors such as the Convair B-58, Rockwell B-70 and B-1A, and perhaps even the B-1B. A USAF general called it a plane that is "not getting older, just getting better." Of the 744 B-52s built, fewer than 100 remain in service, all H-models. The Boeing engineers had built a plane that was strong enough to last and basic enough to be adaptable to the changing technology of air war.



--Pamela Feltus



References and Further Reading:

“First take log out of own eye ”

Since: Jan 07

Defender of Islamic Iran

#19 May 27, 2007
All nations have the right under the NPT to develop nuclear facilities.
Australia has been deeply engaged in enrichment, despite a lack of public awareness of our role. Silex Systems, a private Australian company operating out of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) facility at Lucas Heights, has developed a new method of enrichment using laser technology. On 22 June 2006, Silex Systems announced US government approval for an agreement giving exclusive commercialisation rights to General Electric Company. The Silex-GE agreement will result in commercial deployment of laser enrichment in the US.

There is one very major problem with laser enrichment: the far greater potential for weapons proliferation.

All nations have the right under the NPT to develop nuclear facilities. Australia has been deeply engaged in enrichment, despite a lack of public awareness of our role. Silex Systems, a private Australian company operating out of the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) facility at Lucas Heights, has developed a new method of enrichment using laser technology. On 22 June 2006, Silex Systems announced US government approval for an agreement giving exclusive commercialisation rights to General Electric Company. The Silex-GE agreement will result in commercial deployment of laser enrichment in the US.

There is one very major problem with laser enrichment: the far greater potential for weapons proliferation.

Why is Iran not aloud to enrich uranium?
Is it because the West is xenophobic?

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