Indiana decriminalizing small amount...

Indiana decriminalizing small amounts of marijuana

Posted in the Indianapolis Forum

First Prev
of 3
Next Last

Since: Dec 06

Indianapolis

#1 Sep 21, 2012
State Sen. Brent Steele, Republican Indianapolis, says he will introduce a bill next year to make it an infraction to possess ten grams or less of marijuana, WTHR (Channel 13), The Star's newsgathering partner reported. Violators would be issued a ticket and face a fine, rather than jail time.

Steele said arrests for small amounts of marijuana are an unnecessary drain on law enforcement resources.

"We just spend thousands of dollars on this and I think it's a waste of money," Steele told WTHR.

Since: Dec 06

Indianapolis

#2 Sep 21, 2012
About time they did this. But I say legalize it and tax it and pay down the national debt. Come down hard on other hard drugs.
JOE

Noblesville, IN

#3 Sep 21, 2012
DavidM wrote:
About time they did this. But I say legalize it and tax it and pay down the national debt. Come down hard on other hard drugs.
AGREED!!
k smith

Indianapolis, IN

#4 Sep 21, 2012
I would bet that the people judging the comments are the same ones that go home and crack open a nice cold beer, perhaps a glass of wine to wash down the sleeping pill your dr prescribed you. I want that same opportunity. I'm not hurting anyone. The war on drugs is a waste of taxpayer money and a complete failure. When you're a nation that builds more prisons/jails than schools then you have your priorities backwards. We fought to end prohibition once, we can do it again!

Since: Dec 06

Indianapolis

#5 Sep 22, 2012
I do not misuse pot. It helps me sleep at night. So a couple of bowls in the evening does the trick. I believe that marijuana is a lot safer then alcohol. But on the other hand I know people who get up in the morning and smoke a joint. Smoke all day long. No motivation to do anything else. It is depending on your upbringing and personality. One person that comes down and stays with me, you have to hide the pot because in a week that ounces that you had will be gone.
k smith wrote:
I would bet that the people judging the comments are the same ones that go home and crack open a nice cold beer, perhaps a glass of wine to wash down the sleeping pill your dr prescribed you. I want that same opportunity. I'm not hurting anyone. The war on drugs is a waste of taxpayer money and a complete failure. When you're a nation that builds more prisons/jails than schools then you have your priorities backwards. We fought to end prohibition once, we can do it again!

Since: Aug 12

Indianapolis, IN

#6 Sep 22, 2012
Indiana is not about to decriminalize small amounts of marijuana. A senator said that next year he will introduce a bill which would have that effect but there is virtually no chance that the bill will become law. Relaxing drug laws is hard enough in liberal states like California. Even when the laws get passed there is a conflict with the federal government which still considers marijuana to be illegal.

I personally think that using the prison cells which are currently housing those who have been convicted of marijuana related offenses to extend the terms of violent felons would be a great idea.
wayne

Carmel, IN

#8 Sep 23, 2012


listen up. It never was nor will it ever be a crime to grow, possess or use cannabis. Remember, the people created government and government created the citizen/subject. So stop being subject.
Driver 1

Goshen, IN

#9 Sep 23, 2012
DavidM wrote:
I do not misuse pot. It helps me sleep at night. So a couple of bowls in the evening does the trick. I believe that marijuana is a lot safer then alcohol. But on the other hand I know people who get up in the morning and smoke a joint. Smoke all day long. No motivation to do anything else. It is depending on your upbringing and personality. One person that comes down and stays with me, you have to hide the pot because in a week that ounces that you had will be gone.
<quoted text>
You provide one reason (amongst many others) to not legalize this drug. Some will do nothing else in their lives but stay high.....lord knows we have too many of these yoyo's already. Between booze and drugs that require all of their own meager resources they fall back on taxpayers for food, medical, and other necessities. It will not help anything to tax it (at whatever rate) as this will merely get additional zombie users who will also require taxpayer aid. Also will not create less crime as they will require more ill gotten funds which will drive them too harder crimes! What is needed is stricter punishment the first time and if this effects their later years too bad.

Question.....why would you, a person known statewide, admit on a national forum to committing illegal acts? Your candor is refreshing but probably ill-advised. Have a good day! By the way we do agree on a lot ot things just not this one.

Since: Aug 12

Indianapolis, IN

#10 Sep 23, 2012
Driver 1 wrote:
What is needed is stricter punishment the first time and if this effects their later years too bad.
So you're against legalizing marijuana because those who abuse the drug will end up on welfare. At the same time you suggest that punishment should be stricter for those who use the drug illegally and if it effects their later years then so be it.

Strict punishment for first time possession of hard drugs results in many thousands of people ending up in prison every year. When those people are released they have criminal records which makes them virtually unemployable. That leaves welfare or criminal activity as their only way to survive.

How is filling prisons up with non violent offenders preferable to dealing with the small percentage of users who become addicted on an outpatient basis?
Driver 1

Goshen, IN

#11 Sep 24, 2012
Pontificating wrote:
<quoted text>
So you're against legalizing marijuana because those who abuse the drug will end up on welfare. At the same time you suggest that punishment should be stricter for those who use the drug illegally and if it effects their later years then so be it.
Strict punishment for first time possession of hard drugs results in many thousands of people ending up in prison every year. When those people are released they have criminal records which makes them virtually unemployable. That leaves welfare or criminal activity as their only way to survive.
How is filling prisons up with non violent offenders preferable to dealing with the small percentage of users who become addicted on an outpatient basis?
When as a child your momma told you not to play with electrical outlets you of course continued to do so? The smartest and most likely to succeed attempt to follow basic rules.

Since: Aug 12

Indianapolis, IN

#12 Sep 24, 2012
Driver 1 wrote:
The smartest and most likely to succeed attempt to follow basic rules.
It is mom's role to set basic rules to encourage success, not the government.

Your idea of strict punishment for first time marijuana use is reckless. There are so many people in the system doing hard time for drug possession that all felons have their prison terms automatically cut in half to ease the load. That means that murderers and rapists are walking the streets right now to make space for recreational drug users.

If the penalties for marijuana were to be increased then we'd have to build a bunch of new jails and let inmates out even earlier. Rather than a 20 year term becoming 10 with credit for time served then 8 for educational credit they would have to cut 20 years straight to 5.
referee

Chicago, IL

#13 Sep 24, 2012
Driver 1 wrote:
<quoted text>You provide one reason (amongst many others) to not legalize this drug. Some will do nothing else in their lives but stay high.....lord knows we have too many of these yoyo's already. Between booze and drugs that require all of their own meager resources they fall back on taxpayers for food, medical, and other necessities. It will not help anything to tax it (at whatever rate) as this will merely get additional zombie users who will also require taxpayer aid. Also will not create less crime as they will require more ill gotten funds which will drive them too harder crimes! What is needed is stricter punishment the first time and if this effects their later years too bad.

Question.....why would you, a person known statewide, admit on a national forum to committing illegal acts? Your candor is refreshing but probably ill-advised. Have a good day! By the way we do agree on a lot ot things just not this one.
So you're saying that the 22yr old guy that left the bar and bought an ounce of marijuana on the corner should spend just as much time in prison as the guy that caused a serious accident because he was driving his car intoxicated. Both are class d felonies! While the drunk nearly killed someone's mother/daughter/sister in that accident, the pot smoker did nothing but possess what they feel is a drug. By the way, that pot smoker was a veteran that was injured in Iraq and can't afford surgery or pain meds and marijuana is the only safe substance that can make him tolerate the pain each day.

“Reality is better than truth.”

Since: Nov 09

Indianapolis

#14 Sep 24, 2012
You think people like the ones you describe will become productive workers and citizens if pot or booze is denied them? The chemicals are an excuse, not a cause. If sober, they would just play videogames all day or find some other pastime. In the meantime, those who use it responsibly should not be penalized at all. Legalization would decrease the use of public resources, from police hours to courts to public defenders to jails, saving millions of dollars annually.
Driver 1 wrote:
<quoted text>You provide one reason (amongst many others) to not legalize this drug. Some will do nothing else in their lives but stay high.....lord knows we have too many of these yoyo's already. Between booze and drugs that require all of their own meager resources they fall back on taxpayers for food, medical, and other necessities. It will not help anything to tax it (at whatever rate) as this will merely get additional zombie users who will also require taxpayer aid. Also will not create less crime as they will require more ill gotten funds which will drive them too harder crimes! What is needed is stricter punishment the first time and if this effects their later years too bad.
Question.....why would you, a person known statewide, admit on a national forum to committing illegal acts? Your candor is refreshing but probably ill-advised. Have a good day! By the way we do agree on a lot ot things just not this one.
Driver 1

Goshen, IN

#15 Sep 24, 2012
cpeter1313 wrote:
You think people like the ones you describe will become productive workers and citizens if pot or booze is denied them? The chemicals are an excuse, not a cause. If sober, they would just play videogames all day or find some other pastime. In the meantime, those who use it responsibly should not be penalized at all. Legalization would decrease the use of public resources, from police hours to courts to public defenders to jails, saving millions of dollars annually.
<quoted text>
Quote if you can these savings that have occurred from the States that have legalized medical grass. Where are the savings after Prohibition was lifted? Thought so! Tain't none.....actually more costs.
Driver 1

Goshen, IN

#16 Sep 24, 2012
referee wrote:
<quoted text>
So you're saying that the 22yr old guy that left the bar and bought an ounce of marijuana on the corner should spend just as much time in prison as the guy that caused a serious accident because he was driving his car intoxicated. Both are class d felonies! While the drunk nearly killed someone's mother/daughter/sister in that accident, the pot smoker did nothing but possess what they feel is a drug. By the way, that pot smoker was a veteran that was injured in Iraq and can't afford surgery or pain meds and marijuana is the only safe substance that can make him tolerate the pain each day.
Not familiar with your 22 year old guy. My reply was to a guy that claims to be financally solvent. If his medical problems are indeed war related he would be elgible for goverment assistance-----more likely it is a flimsy excuse too get high. Agreed?

“Reality is better than truth.”

Since: Nov 09

Indianapolis

#17 Sep 24, 2012
Stats with medical marijuana ALSO still have laws against non-medical use, so the same resources are being used. Legalizing it altogether is how you save money.

It's not JUST money; there simply is no reason to imprison or arrest people for grass any more than if they had chamomile tea or any other herbal substance. I could grow an entire garden of poisonous plants and wipe out the neighborhood, but if I were to grow a single pot plant I could go to jail. It makes no sense at all.
Driver 1 wrote:
<quoted text>Quote if you can these savings that have occurred from the States that have legalized medical grass. Where are the savings after Prohibition was lifted? Thought so! Tain't none.....actually more costs.

Since: Aug 12

Indianapolis, IN

#18 Sep 24, 2012
Driver 1 wrote:
Quote if you can these savings that have occurred from the States that have legalized medical grass. Where are the savings after Prohibition was lifted? Thought so! Tain't none.....actually more costs.
According to federal law marijuana is still illegal in all 50 states. There can be no savings because there are still plenty of people being locked up in those states for marijuana related crimes.

Are you trying to suggest that prohibition was a good thing? Alcohol is so easy to brew that inmates make it in their prison cells with left over scraps of food. Regulating the product and selling it legally is certainly safer than letting criminals profit by selling it on the black market.

Since: Dec 06

Indianapolis

#19 Sep 24, 2012
With pot at $120 an ounce, they should put a $30 tax on it and we would have the national debt almost paid off in 10 years. IF that is where they directed the money to. That would be the problem.
Driver 1

Goshen, IN

#21 Sep 24, 2012
DavidM wrote:
With pot at $120 an ounce, they should put a $30 tax on it and we would have the national debt almost paid off in 10 years. IF that is where they directed the money to. That would be the problem.
The theory of taxing weed and paying off the national or any other debt is beyond stupity. Firstly would you have legal growing fields and every other home gardener subject to the same penalties as today? How would that change anything? How are you gonna tax stamp the grow your own craft weed to prove you have paid taxes? Natch.....it would be color coded! The IRS has trouble collected payroll taxes now why would'nt there be those evading these taxes? Why would the price remain at $120 a ounce when every Tom, Dick, and Harry can have his own crop with merely paying a growing tax?

This whole issue is a total waste of time as druggers will be druggies and will always invent some weak scenerio of what if's (read 'em here)!!! The cure is first conviction at whatever age a mandatory prison sentence (no outs) for all. Probably three years hard time for your buddy would make others wonder if drugs are really worth the effort and expense.

Since: Dec 06

Indianapolis

#22 Sep 25, 2012
What is you plan to pay off the debt? Or will you just let it grow and grow like it has for yes? How do they tax tobacco? It could work just like tobacco. How do they control alcohol tax or any other product tax?
Driver 1 wrote:
<quoted text>The theory of taxing weed and paying off the national or any other debt is beyond stupity. Firstly would you have legal growing fields and every other home gardener subject to the same penalties as today? How would that change anything? How are you gonna tax stamp the grow your own craft weed to prove you have paid taxes? Natch.....it would be color coded! The IRS has trouble collected payroll taxes now why would'nt there be those evading these taxes? Why would the price remain at $120 a ounce when every Tom, Dick, and Harry can have his own crop with merely paying a growing tax?
This whole issue is a total waste of time as druggers will be druggies and will always invent some weak scenerio of what if's (read 'em here)!!! The cure is first conviction at whatever age a mandatory prison sentence (no outs) for all. Probably three years hard time for your buddy would make others wonder if drugs are really worth the effort and expense.

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker
First Prev
of 3
Next Last

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Indianapolis Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
Spiro Agnew (Nov '14) Sat OPERATION GLADIO 11
Carriage House East Apts (Jun '13) Aug 25 The REAL Moon God... 16
Custody attorney Aug 25 Ealj1818 3
Closing of the Marion County Children's Guardia... (Apr '09) Aug 24 Iansane90 35
Bruce Springsteen sucks anyways Aug 24 Ivyawe 7
does pepsi drug test? which type? (Jul '14) Aug 24 Amanda 20
News Local restaurant included in statewide money la... Aug 24 ok 3

Indianapolis Jobs

More from around the web

Personal Finance

Indianapolis Mortgages