Four Indianapolis men accused of heroin trafficking

Apr 10, 2014 Full story: The Indianapolis Star 20

Four Indianapolis men are facing federal drug charges following an investigation into an alleged heroin drug trafficking operation in the Brightwood neighborhood on the Eastside.

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The Ultimate Kaptoz

Indianapolis, IN

#1 Apr 11, 2014
They are all Hispanics pumping heroin on to our streets getting young teens hooked on heroin, These are the illegals Liberals support and give everything, That is who blacks should be angry at Is the illegal Hispanics,, They are so lame hey don't care as long as they get what they get from the Govt and tax payers. Guess what those illegal Hispanics will soon be legalized . The freebies many black got before, They won't get as many anymore when Hispanics are in charge as they run for offices and have power over those blacks now.Go ahead and separate yourself in society from white people you envy and hate under Obama your Messiah. In the end you lose more that your older black leaders fought to maintain . Whine all you want about the white man keeping you down. How much you think the Hispanics in power will give you?
Herb

Indianapolis, IN

#2 Apr 12, 2014
The people who allow the drug problem to continue unchecked, go all the way to the top of the chain. And a little clue, they're not Hispanics.
man kind

Phoenix, AZ

#3 Apr 12, 2014
heroin is not a crime,some people try to make it a crime.if it comes from earth than how is it a crime,mite be there earth is a crime to them.
Herb

Indianapolis, IN

#4 Apr 13, 2014
Its a crime according to law for the protection of citizens, just not enforced. Too many users in the court and legislative areas.

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#5 Apr 13, 2014
Herb wrote:
Its a crime according to law for the protection of citizens, just not enforced. Too many users in the court and legislative areas.
Citizens wouldn't need protecting if it wasn't against the law. Criminalization causes a lot of the crime associated with heroin, actually almost all when you take it back to the roots
Herb

Indianapolis, IN

#6 Apr 14, 2014
Velvet MJK wrote:
<quoted text>
Citizens wouldn't need protecting if it wasn't against the law. Criminalization causes a lot of the crime associated with heroin, actually almost all when you take it back to the roots
The idea is to prevent death, which is inevitable. If the person(s) is not a productive member of society then it probably doesn't make a difference in the long term. If we change our thought process to accept death, then yes, it would make no sense in criminalizing the drug. That thought process is not accepted as the norm.

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#7 Apr 14, 2014
Herb wrote:
<quoted text> The idea is to prevent death, which is inevitable. If the person(s) is not a productive member of society then it probably doesn't make a difference in the long term. If we change our thought process to accept death, then yes, it would make no sense in criminalizing the drug. That thought process is not accepted as the norm.
Criminalising does not prevent deaths it increasing them. Those who indulge are going to do so legal or not, just as those who don't aren't going to just because it's legal.
Keeping heroin, or any drug, illegal increasing overdoses, both intentional and unintentional
Herb

Indianapolis, IN

#8 Apr 15, 2014
Fact: Most heroin users are not "productive" members of society.

That said, it stands to reason that most will commit crimes in order to purchase more heroin. Those arrested for those crimes, will have a short period in jail which temporarily cuts crime until their release. A small minority will successfully attend treatment programs and not repeat their offenses. Bottom line is, even if you legalize it, they still have to pay for it.

The same argument does not hold true for marijuana, which is a recreational drug without the addictive downfalls and eventually it will be legal in all US states as legislators become educated.

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#9 Apr 15, 2014
Herb wrote:
Fact: Most heroin users are not "productive" members of society.
That said, it stands to reason that most will commit crimes in order to purchase more heroin. Those arrested for those crimes, will have a short period in jail which temporarily cuts crime until their release. A small minority will successfully attend treatment programs and not repeat their offenses. Bottom line is, even if you legalize it, they still have to pay for it.
The same argument does not hold true for marijuana, which is a recreational drug without the addictive downfalls and eventually it will be legal in all US states as legislators become educated.
The reason people can't afford H is because it's illegal. It's not that expensive to produce and if it were legal it could be cheaper and people would not have to commit so many other crimes to buy it
Herb

Indianapolis, IN

#10 Apr 16, 2014
You seem to forget that not all heroin users have rich families. After abuse begins the work, if there was any, stops..

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#11 Apr 17, 2014
Herb wrote:
You seem to forget that not all heroin users have rich families. After abuse begins the work, if there was any, stops..
I don't forget. I know that .....wasn't talking rich families was talking legal prices would be not any higher than alcolhol or cigarettes ....which most, even on social benefits, can afford. And, some people fit their work and use together ok ....not the majority, but some
Herb

Indianapolis, IN

#12 Apr 19, 2014
You're referring to a very small minority of users. Most of them can't afford a decent place to live, let alone get enough food from snap benefits. Many shoplift retailers for quick cash, clothing, food items, alcohol. Others burglarize, rob, etc.. Fact is, most users couldn't work if they wanted to, depending on the strength of their addiction and workplace drug testing. Don't forget the medical issues and I'm not talking overdoses. I honestly think marijuana should be legalized but heroin, no way. Seen too many friends lose family to the drug and its not worth it. The key is any drug that has a strong propensity to affect the lives of the non-users in a negative manner should not be allowed.

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#13 Apr 21, 2014
Herb wrote:
You're referring to a very small minority of users. Most of them can't afford a decent place to live, let alone get enough food from snap benefits. Many shoplift retailers for quick cash, clothing, food items, alcohol. Others burglarize, rob, etc.. Fact is, most users couldn't work if they wanted to, depending on the strength of their addiction and workplace drug testing. Don't forget the medical issues and I'm not talking overdoses. I honestly think marijuana should be legalized but heroin, no way. Seen too many friends lose family to the drug and its not worth it. The key is any drug that has a strong propensity to affect the lives of the non-users in a negative manner should not be allowed.
Yes I hear what you're saying and I've lost people to heroin too.
Thing is people are going to take drugs legal or not. Least legal they can be cleaner [not cut with krap or of a russian roulette strength] and more affordable [on a par with any over the counter medicine]
Herb

Indianapolis, IN

#14 Apr 24, 2014
Once again, it depends on the drug. I've said for years that the government could allow many other drugs for recreational use that have little "collateral" affect for innocent people, but in our lawsuit controlled society, the liability issue is the driving force. The other issue that continues to torment lawmakers is the economic side. Can any drug that we legalize be used for recreational purposes by the user, yet still allow the user to be a contributing member of society? Can they keep gainful employment and be independent is the real question? There are many drugs that don't have the dependency issues but the costs are huge. Legalization can bring down costs, no doubt, but we are VERY slow to act.
Lookat

Fishers, IN

#15 Jun 5, 2014
Look at portugal. They decriminalized all drugs. Its still illegal. But you can have a few grams of heroin on you and not get into trouble. Same for everything else. And they have been seeing great results.

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#16 Jun 7, 2014
Herb wrote:
Once again, it depends on the drug. I've said for years that the government could allow many other drugs for recreational use that have little "collateral" affect for innocent people, but in our lawsuit controlled society, the liability issue is the driving force. The other issue that continues to torment lawmakers is the economic side. Can any drug that we legalize be used for recreational purposes by the user, yet still allow the user to be a contributing member of society? Can they keep gainful employment and be independent is the real question? There are many drugs that don't have the dependency issues but the costs are huge. Legalization can bring down costs, no doubt, but we are VERY slow to act.
you might be surprised how many people in high flying jobs are doing just that recreationally. For a period of time, yes many can and do hold employment, for as long as they might have otherwise. And as for the others [majority probably] well they wouldn't be permanetly employed anyways, so the difference being they would be doing the same but without the criminal record, without as much risks to themselves from unregulated pharmaceuticals and with less crime needed to feed
But Seriously Folks

Indianapolis, IN

#17 Jun 30, 2014
Are you seriously trying to use the same arguments for heroin that apply for pot? You need to put down the needle, pal.

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#18 Jul 5, 2014
But Seriously Folks wrote:
Are you seriously trying to use the same arguments for heroin that apply for pot? You need to put down the needle, pal.
why not ?

people [adults] should be able to make their own choices of what they do with their bodies, whether it is bad for them or not. why criminalise something which is a choice and if allowed [legal] has minimal to no impact directly on others
velogeezer

Indianapolis, IN

#19 Jul 5, 2014
Too bad ;there are too many of them to give them all a Darwin Award for voluntarily de contaminating the gene pool.
It's a crowded world. If those numb nuts want to get ;hooked on heroin and off themselves, more power to them.

Since: Jan 13

Location hidden

#20 Jul 15, 2014
velogeezer wrote:
Too bad ;there are too many of them to give them all a Darwin Award for voluntarily de contaminating the gene pool.
It's a crowded world. If those numb nuts want to get ;hooked on heroin and off themselves, more power to them.
cept it doesn't make anyone infertile
just as no drugs doesn't make You any more intelligent

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