Thank Global Warming For Softening The Blow Of Hurricane Sandy

Nov 2, 2013 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: The Heartland Institute

One year ago [Tuesday], Hurricane Sandy made landfall in New Jersey, killing more than 100 people and causing more than $50 billion in damage.

Comments

Showing posts 1 - 10 of10
LessHypeMoreFact

Toronto, Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#1
Nov 2, 2013
 

Judged:

6

5

4

More silliness from the Heartland Mental Institution. Those inmates are hysterical.

Now, fact..

http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/global-warming-and-h...
Cut n Paste

Minneapolis, MN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2
Nov 2, 2013
 

Judged:

5

5

5

It is premature to conclude that human activities--and particularly greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming--have already had a detectable impact on Atlantic hurricane activity. That said, human activities may have already caused changes that are not yet detectable due to the small magnitude of the changes or observational limitations, or are not yet properly modeled (e.g., aerosol effects).
Now here are the opinions:

Anthropogenic warming by the end of the 21st century will likely cause hurricanes globally to be more intense on average (by 2 to 11% according to model projections for an IPCC A1B scenario). This change would imply an even larger percentage increase in the destructive potential per storm, assuming no reduction in storm size.
There are better than even odds that anthropogenic warming over the next century will lead to an increase in the numbers of very intense hurricanes in some basins—an increase that would be substantially larger in percentage terms than the 2-11% increase in the average storm intensity. This increase in intense storm numbers is projected despite a likely decrease (or little change) in the global numbers of all tropical storms.
Anthropogenic warming by the end of the 21st century will likely cause hurricanes to have substantially higher rainfall rates than present-day hurricanes, with a model-projected increase of about 20% for rainfall rates averaged within about 100 km of the storm center.

http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/global-warming-and-h...
Cut n Paste

Minneapolis, MN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#3
Nov 2, 2013
 

Judged:

5

5

5

Being able to tell the difference between "fact" and opinion lends credibility to one's augments.

Since: Apr 08

"the green troll"

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#4
Nov 2, 2013
 

Judged:

4

3

3

Cut n Paste wrote:
Being able to tell the difference between "fact" and opinion lends credibility to one's augments.
Increased damage from storms due to:

*sea level rise
*increased energy of storm due to warmer ocean temperatures
*increased precipitation during storms due to increased evaporation and air temperature

are all facts.
LessHypeMoreFact

Toronto, Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5
Nov 2, 2013
 

Judged:

6

5

4

Fair Game wrote:
<quoted text>
Increased damage from storms due to:
*increased energy of storm due to warmer ocean temperatures
There is evidence from a robot ocean probe (RU16) during Hurricane Irene, that shows the water column and how dramatically and deeply the heat is extracted to fuel the hurricane.

http://maracoos.org/irene/

Also in an article "The Ocean Robot Network" in the Nov-Dec issue of American Scientist.
dont drink the koolaid

Minneapolis, MN

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#6
Nov 5, 2013
 

Judged:

2

2

2

Fair Game wrote:
<quoted text>
Increased damage from storms due to:
*sea level rise
*increased energy of storm due to warmer ocean temperatures
*increased precipitation during storms due to increased evaporation and air temperature
are all facts.
Yes! As recently as 500 years ago there was not a single record of a city sustaining damage from a hurricane striking the East Coast... facts are beyond question.
LessHypeMoreFact

Toronto, Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#7
Nov 5, 2013
 

Judged:

6

5

4

dont drink the koolaid wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes! As recently as 500 years ago there was not a single record of a city sustaining damage from a hurricane striking the East Coast... facts are beyond question.
Guess what?

http://tinyurl.com/nlo8emk

And the ITCZ is moving north from AGW. The east coast will get hit now (and the Gulf will get a breather) more often. AGW has done in a few decades what would NORMALLY take millennial scale shifts.

Since: Apr 08

"the green troll"

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#8
Nov 6, 2013
 

Judged:

2

2

2

dont drink the koolaid wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes! As recently as 500 years ago there was not a single record of a city sustaining damage from a hurricane striking the East Coast... facts are beyond question.
Fair Game wrote:
<quoted text>
Increased damage from storms due to:
*sea level rise
*increased energy of storm due to warmer ocean temperatures
*increased precipitation during storms due to increased evaporation and air temperature
are all facts.
You ignore these facts and focus on the non-issue of storms happening in the past: a straw man argument.

In anybody with an intellect, it would be a sign of dishonesty; in you I think it's just more evidence of utter stupidity.
LessHypeMoreFact

Toronto, Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#9
Nov 6, 2013
 

Judged:

6

5

4

dont drink the koolaid wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes! As recently as 500 years ago there was not a single record of a city sustaining damage from a hurricane striking the East Coast... facts are beyond question.
By the way, what do you consider the 'east coast'. Isn't Florida on the East Coast..

Or do you have some special definition that avoids Miami and any other city that got hit?

Not that this changes that he ITCZ is moving north and this is likely to mean more hurricanes in the vulnerable (and unprepared) East Coast cities.
SpaceBlues

Houston, TX

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#10
Nov 6, 2013
 

Judged:

6

5

4

dont drink the koolaid wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes! As recently as 500 years ago there was not a single record of a city sustaining damage from a hurricane striking the East Coast... facts are beyond question.
LOL. Facts beget questions like what are you drinking?

Five hundred years ago, what cities were there in the US atlantic coastline?

P.S. Colonial History[wikipedia]

Twelve of the original Thirteen Colonies of the United Kingdom in North America that later become the original states of the United States, each founded between 1607 (Virginia) and 1733 (Georgia), lay along the East Coast.[a] Two additional U.S. states on the East Coast were not among the original Thirteen Colonies: Maine (settled by the French, but later became part of British colony of Massachusetts in 1677)[1] and Florida (which traded hands between the British and Spanish until 1821).[2] The Middle Colonies (New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York and Delaware) had been owned by the Dutch as New Netherland until they were captured by the British in the mid-to-late 17th century.

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

Showing posts 1 - 10 of10
Type in your comments below
Name
(appears on your post)
Comments
Characters left: 4000
Type the numbers you see in the image on the right:

Please note by clicking on "Post Comment" you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

•••
•••