Eco Fair Kicks Off Earth Day Celebrat...

Eco Fair Kicks Off Earth Day Celebrations

There are 15 comments on the NBC29 Charlottesville story from Apr 19, 2013, titled Eco Fair Kicks Off Earth Day Celebrations. In it, NBC29 Charlottesville reports that:

People in Charlottesville were in the Earth Day spirit on Sunday as hundreds attended the Eco Fair inside the Main Street Arena.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at NBC29 Charlottesville.

Steven

Atlanta, GA

#1 Apr 21, 2013
I'm sure everyone who attended drove their Prius downtown. Where these Earth-worshippers at an Eco fair or an Ego fair?
Just Checking

Herndon, VA

#10 Apr 22, 2013
"Attendees also learned how to get rid of pesky Chinese mystery snails.

"With a little bit of ingenuity you can go and harvest them and we can actually eat our way out of a lot of invasive problems," Glendinning said."

Well.....where's the tasty little recipe for Chinese mystery snails?
Dude

Spotsylvania, VA

#11 Apr 22, 2013
At some level we're all environmentalists, putting the climate change debate aside for the moment; we all want clean air to breathe, potable water to drink, and arable land to grow food upon, hopefully without absorbing leathal chemicals.
.
The notion that Life, Liberty, and the pursuit of happiness are rights is considered an inherent one. Without breathable air, potable water, and arable land, life is unsustainable.
.
That does not only make all of us at some level environmentalists, but we also reconize environmentalism an inherent right. There is nothing wrong with ensuring the survival of the species for future generations.
.
The planet is like a ship that is on fire, at this point, we have nowhere else to go, so we better fight the fire.
Dude

Spotsylvania, VA

#12 Apr 22, 2013
*lethal
*recognize
*as an inerent

"We have not inherited this earth from our parents to do with it what we will. We have borrowed it from our children and we must be careful to use it in their interests as well as our own. Anyone who fails to recognise the basic validity of the proposition put in different ways by increasing numbers of writers, from Malthus to The Club of Rome, is either ignorant, a fool, or evil."

~Moses Henry Cass
Dude

Spotsylvania, VA

#13 Apr 22, 2013
*inherent

(I apologize for my lack of proof reading today.)

*bangdesk*
I give up

Ferrum, VA

#14 Apr 22, 2013
I hope no trees were harmed in the form of toilet paper for this event.
Dude

Spotsylvania, VA

#15 Apr 22, 2013
I give up wrote:
I hope no trees were harmed in the form of toilet paper for this event.
Trees are an excellent renewable resource. I know a few pulpwood farmers here. It's a multi-million dollar industry.
WVU

Purcellville, VA

#16 Apr 22, 2013
HERE ARE PREDICTIONS FROM EARTH DAY 1970
Earth Day predictions of 1970. The reason you shouldn’t believe Earth Day predictions of 2009.
by editor on April 22, 2009
Luckily, we haven't run out of oil, but have exhausted our supply of 70s fashion.
Luckily, we haven't run out of oil, but we have exhausted our supply of 70s fashion.
For the next 24 hours, the media will assault us with tales of imminent disaster that always accompany the annual Earth Day Doom & Gloom Extravaganza.
Ignore them. They’ll be wrong. We’re confident in saying that because they’ve always been wrong. And always will be.
Need proof? Here are some of the hilarious, spectacularly wrong predictions made on the occasion of Earth Day 1970.
“We have about five more years at the outside to do something.”
• Kenneth Watt, ecologist
“Civilization will end within 15 or 30 years unless immediate action is taken against problems facing mankind.”
• George Wald, Harvard Biologist
“We are in an environmental crisis which threatens the survival of this nation, and of the world as a suitable place of human habitation.”
• Barry Commoner, Washington University biologist
“Man must stop pollution and conserve his resources, not merely to enhance existence but to save the race from intolerable deterioration and possible extinction.”
• New York Times editorial, the day after the first Earth Day
“Population will inevitably and completely outstrip whatever small increases in food supplies we make. The death rate will increase until at least 100-200 million people per year will be starving to death during the next ten years.”
• Paul Ehrlich, Stanford University biologist
“By…[1975] some experts feel that food shortages will have escalated the present level of world hunger and starvation into famines of unbelievable proportions. Other experts, more optimistic, think the ultimate food-population collision will not occur until the decade of the 1980s.”
• Paul Ehrlich, Stanford University biologist
“It is already too late to avoid mass starvation.”
• Denis Hayes, chief organizer for Earth Day
“Demographers agree almost unanimously on the following grim timetable: by 1975 widespread famines will begin in India; these will spread by 1990 to include all of India, Pakistan, China and the Near East, Africa. By the year 2000, or conceivably sooner, South and Central America will exist under famine conditions….By the year 2000, thirty years from now, the entire world, with the exception of Western Europe, North America, and Australia, will be in famine.”
• Peter Gunter, professor, North Texas State University
“Scientists have solid experimental and theoretical evidence to support…the following predictions: In a decade, urban dwellers will have to wear gas masks to survive air pollution…by 1985 air pollution will have reduced the amount of sunlight reaching earth by one half….”
• Life Magazine, January 1970
“At the present rate of nitrogen buildup, it’s only a matter of time before light will be filtered out of the atmosphere and none of our land will be usable.”
• Kenneth Watt, Ecologist
Stanford's Paul Ehrlich announces that the sky is falling.
Stanford's Paul Ehrlich announces that the sky is falling.
“Air pollution…is certainly going to take hundreds of thousands of lives in the next few years alone.”
• Paul Ehrlich, Stanford University biologist
“We are prospecting for the very last of our resources and using up the nonrenewable things many times faster than we are finding new ones.”
• Martin Litton, Sierra Club director
“By the year 2000, if present trends continue, we will be using up crude oil at such a rate…that there won’t be any more crude oil. You’ll drive up to the pump and say,`Fill ‘er up, buddy,’ and he’ll say,`I am very sorry, there isn’t any.’”
• Kenneth Watt, Ecologist
“Dr. S. Dillon Ripley, secretary of the Smithsonian Institute, believes that in 25 years, somewhere between 75 and 80 percent of all the species of living animals will be extinct.”
WVU

Purcellville, VA

#17 Apr 22, 2013
This article has the predictions made at the 1970 Earth Day.
http://www.ihatethemedia.com/earth-day-predic...
Dude

Spotsylvania, VA

#18 Apr 22, 2013
WVU wrote:
HERE ARE PREDICTIONS FROM EARTH DAY 1970
Earth Day predictions of 1970. The reason you shouldn’t believe Earth Day predictions of 2009.
by editor on April 22, 2009
Luckily, we haven't run out of oil, but have exhausted our supply of 70s fashion.
Luckily, we haven't run out of oil, but we have exhausted our supply of 70s fashion.
For the next 24 hours, the media will assault us with tales of imminent disaster that always accompany the annual Earth Day Doom & Gloom Extravaganza.
Ignore them. They’ll be wrong. We’re confident in saying that because they’ve always been wrong. And always will be.
Need proof? Here are some of the hilarious, spectacularly wrong predictions made on the occasion of Earth Day 1970.
“Man must stop pollution and conserve his resources, not merely to enhance existence but to save the race from intolerable deterioration and possible extinction.”
• New York Times editorial, the day after the first Earth Day
“Population will inevitably and completely outstrip whatever small increases in food supplies we make. The death rate will increase until at least 100-200 million people per year will be starving to death during the next ten years.”
• Paul Ehrlich, Stanford University biologist
“By…[1975] some experts feel that food shortages will have escalated the present level of world hunger and starvation into famines of unbelievable proportions. Other experts, more optimistic, think the ultimate food-population collision will not occur until the decade of the 1980s.”
• Paul Ehrlich, Stanford University biologist
“It is already too late to avoid mass starvation.”
• Denis Hayes, chief organizer for Earth Day
“Demographers agree almost unanimously on the following grim timetable: by 1975 widespread famines will begin in India; these will spread by 1990 to include all of India, Pakistan, China and the Near East, Africa. By the year 2000, or conceivably sooner, South and Central America will exist under famine conditions….By the year 2000, thirty years from now, the entire world, with the exception of Western Europe, North America, and Australia, will be in famine.”
• Peter Gunter, professor, North Texas State University
“Scientists have solid experimental and theoretical evidence to support…the following predictions: In a decade, urban dwellers will have to wear gas masks to survive air pollution…by 1985 air pollution will have reduced the amount of sunlight reaching earth by one half….”
• Life Magazine, January 1970
“At the present rate of nitrogen buildup, it’s only a matter of time before light will be filtered out of the atmosphere and none of our land will be usable.”
• Kenneth Watt, Ecologist
Stanford's Paul Ehrlich announces that the sky is falling.
Stanford's Paul Ehrlich announces that the sky is falling.
“Air pollution…is certainly going to take hundreds of thousands of lives in the next few years alone.”
• Paul Ehrlich, Stanford University biologist
“We are prospecting for the very last of our resources and using up the nonrenewable things many times faster than we are finding new ones.”
• Martin Litton, Sierra Club director
“By the year 2000, if present trends continue, we will be using up crude oil at such a rate…that there won’t be any more crude oil. You’ll drive up to the pump and say,`Fill ‘er up, buddy,’ and he’ll say,`I am very sorry, there isn’t any.’”
• Kenneth Watt, Ecologist
“Dr. S. Dillon Ripley, secretary of the Smithsonian Institute, believes that in 25 years, somewhere between 75 and 80 percent of all the species of living animals will be extinct.”
To be fair, we didn't stay the course that we were in in 1970. With the advent of the cuyahoga river fire, so came the EPA. Fish that were inedible or poisonous, in the Great Lakes are now edible.
Dude

Spotsylvania, VA

#19 Apr 22, 2013
WVU wrote:
HERE ARE PREDICTIONS FROM EARTH DAY 1970
Earth Day predictions of 1970. The reason you shouldn’t believe Earth Day predictions of 2009.
by editor on April 22, 2009
Luckily, we haven't run out of oil, but have exhausted our supply of 70s fashion.
Luckily, we haven't run out of oil, but we have exhausted our supply of 70s fashion.
For the next 24 hours, the media will assault us with tales of imminent disaster that always accompany the annual Earth Day Doom & Gloom Extravaganza.
Ignore them. They’ll be wrong. We’re confident in saying that because they’ve always been wrong. And always will be.
Need proof? Here are some of the hilarious, spectacularly wrong predictions made on the occasion of Earth Day 1970.
“We have about five more years at the outside to do something.”
• Kenneth Watt, ecologist
“Civilization will end within 15 or 30 years unless immediate action is taken against problems facing mankind.”
• George Wald, Harvard Biologist
“We are in an environmental crisis which threatens the survival of this nation, and of the world as a suitable place of human habitation.”
• Barry Commoner, Washington University biologist
“Man must stop pollution and conserve his resources, not merely to enhance existence but to save the race from intolerable deterioration and possible extinction.”
• New York Times editorial, the day after the first Earth Day
“Population will inevitably and completely outstrip whatever small increases in food supplies we make. The death rate will increase until at least 100-200 million people per year will be starving to death during the next ten years.”
• Paul Ehrlich, Stanford University biologist
“By…[1975] some experts feel that food shortages will have escalated the present level of world hunger and starvation into famines of unbelievable proportions. Other experts, more optimistic, think the ultimate food-population collision will not occur until the decade of the 1980s.”
• Paul Ehrlich, Stanford University biologist
“Dr. S. Dillon Ripley, secretary of the Smithsonian Institute, believes that in 25 years, somewhere between 75 and 80 percent of all the species of living animals will be extinct.”
To be fair, we haven't stayed the course from where we were on in 1970. Along with the Cyahoga River fire(s), so did the EPA. Fish that were once inedible to eat, and poisonous are now edible.

You may think it's okay to poision your environment, and that's fine, but it's not when you infringe on the rights of others.
WVU

Purcellville, VA

#20 Apr 22, 2013
Dude wrote:
<quoted text>To be fair, we haven't stayed the course from where we were on in 1970. Along with the Cyahoga River fire(s), so did the EPA. Fish that were once inedible to eat, and poisonous are now edible.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v =TM8eAZ5CF8kXX
You may think it's okay to poision your environment, and that's fine, but it's not when you infringe on the rights of others.
So I post an article and you assume I think it is okay to poison the environment. Glad to see you have no problem stereotyping a person you do not know.
BTW... Cuyahoga is not spelled Cyahoga and poison is not spelled poision
Dude

Spotsylvania, VA

#21 Apr 22, 2013
WVU wrote:
<quoted text>
So I post an article and you assume I think it is okay to poison the environment. Glad to see you have no problem stereotyping a person you do not know.
BTW... Cuyahoga is not spelled Cyahoga and poison is not spelled poision
Yeah, I've been having a problem with that today. I'm alright with that, and if it bothers you, even better. Regardless, yes; it appears you think that poisoning the environment and trouncing on other's civil liberties and personal property rights is okay. Otherwise you wouldn't have posted you anti-environmental agenda post without recognizing the steps the country, or for that matter, the established industrial world has taken to remediate the problems.
Traffic Alert

Washington, DC

#22 Apr 22, 2013
You can lead a person to an Eco-Fair, but you CAN'T make them think!"

So I'm walking out the door of the Eco-Fair and I see a nice Charlottesville city employee browsing the outdoor trash display tent while 20 feet away, his city pickup truck is idling, with NO ONE IN IT!

Maybe he was just running the A/C so his bag lunch would stay cold?!?
Stupid Liberal

Charlottesville, VA

#23 Apr 22, 2013
All the old growth trees in the area are too big to hug so I chopped them down so the whole village could share in hugging them!

Tell me when this thread is updated:

Subscribe Now Add to my Tracker

Add your comments below

Characters left: 4000

Please note by submitting this form you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Home Gardening Discussions

Title Updated Last By Comments
News Mannington District Fair returns with excitement (Aug '08) 2 hr Potential 29
News Significance of 'Victory Homes' not lost on Her... (Jun '09) 10 hr Why Your Grey Mat... 4
News Veganism - doing the right thing (Jul '11) Thu Boo 965
News United Way's Tea at the Manor offers more than ... (Jul '10) Jun 29 pretty closed club 22
News Sam Sherratt School students cultivate outdoor ... Jun 29 Mini-Excavator 1
News Two green thumbs up in celebration of 90 yearsH... Jun 22 lotsa words on st... 1
News Wal-Mart opening slated for late summer Jun 20 kiel duh cumspunj 19
More from around the web