Spanish Colonial Embroidery: An endan...

Spanish Colonial Embroidery: An endangered art form

There are 15 comments on the The Santa Fe New Mexican story from Jan 11, 2009, titled Spanish Colonial Embroidery: An endangered art form. In it, The Santa Fe New Mexican reports that:

Photo: From left, Ella Rappaport, 10, Hana Snyder, 11, and Chloe Plymale, 10, learn the Spanish Colonial art of colcha embroidery from artist Julia Gomez on Wednesday at Acequia Madre Elementary School.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Santa Fe New Mexican.

whatever

Albuquerque, NM

#1 Jan 11, 2009
The experiment is nearly complete and it won't be long now until the fiesta king and queen are "Smith and Jones." Marilyn Bane and katherine heldemeyer have anglified the town in the name of "preservation."
churro

Espanola, NM

#2 Jan 12, 2009
Will you knit, be polit, and define; "... colonial roots in the Territorial culture ..."
churro

Espanola, NM

#3 Jan 12, 2009
ps:
"Asked if she thinks women will be doing colcha for generations to come, she answered ..." Please take the blinders off.
Maria

AOL

#4 Jan 12, 2009
Good story, but THIS is your headline? NO wonder the New Mexican is going under. ANY I read in the New Mexican, I read in the Journal at least 3 days earlier. Come on folks.
Maria

AOL

#5 Jan 12, 2009
* any news....
Mildred Martinez

Albuquerque, NM

#6 Jan 12, 2009
Yes, it is so true - many of the generation now have not really taken interest on learning embroidery. I was raised by my grandparents and I myself learned embroidery from watching my grandmother. I have always been interested on our tradition and culture. In my family I am the only one who learned embroidery like my grandmother. I am hoping that maybe the young generation would like to learn - but no interest from them - so it seems. I am trying to teach my daughter - but her interest isn't like the way mine was. This is such a beautiful art - - -

“Get Drunk; Find a Gun.”

Since: Oct 08

Pripyat, Ukraine

#7 Jan 12, 2009
Good Riddance. "Heritage" and "Culture" is just a nice way of saying Racism.

"Culture" (noun): The predominating attitudes and behavior that characterize the functioning of a group or organization.

This definition also fits "Stereotype" and other types of Racism.

Since: Sep 08

Santa Fe, NM

#8 Jan 12, 2009
Just an observation. The first time I went to Spanish Market, about 16 years ago, there was only one woman showing colcha. Last year there were half a dozen (that I recall; may have been more). As long as colcha was something that women created for daily use, it was readily supplanted by blankets and rugs from Sears and Roebuck; now that it's a cherished traditional art form, its chances of survival are a whole lot better.
cliff mills

Santa Fe, NM

#9 Jan 12, 2009
Thanks to Julia Gomez and all the others for keeping this beautiful New Mexican folk art alive.
cliff mills

Santa Fe, NM

#10 Jan 12, 2009
Also, a good positive story.

“Down in the Bayou”

Since: Apr 08

Vancleave Mississippi

#11 Jan 12, 2009
tacky

Since: Sep 08

Santa Fe, NM

#12 Jan 12, 2009
Maria wrote:
Good story, but THIS is your headline? NO wonder the New Mexican is going under. ANY I read in the New Mexican, I read in the Journal at least 3 days earlier. Come on folks.
Nope. The Journal had an article about a different exhibit that included colcha and other traditional art forms -- not this exhibit.
Patricia Cummings

Concord, NH

#13 Jan 12, 2009
This is a wonderful article. It was fun to realize that the New Deal had a part in reviving this type of embroidery. I notice that the colcha stitch cannot be exactly compared to couching as the tacking stitches are more on a diagonal slant than English couching. I have a file about colcha embroidery on my website. It is a wonderful art form that I hope never dies.
Pat Cummings
http://www.quiltersmuse.com
Cecil Stark Albuquerque

Albuquerque, NM

#15 Jan 12, 2009
I was happy to read the article on Colcha Embroidery. My mother, Tillie Gabaldon Stark was considered to be a master in this art form. She learned the craft while working at the NATIVE MARKET in Santa Fe during the 1930's. She exhibited her work at the annual Spanish Markets and the New Mexico State Fair. She did this in order to keep the craft alive. She also taught the craft. I have also emailed my comments and suggestions to the writer of the article (Julie Ann Grimm).

“Get Drunk; Find a Gun.”

Since: Oct 08

Pripyat, Ukraine

#17 Jan 13, 2009
Die Israel wrote:
Luay Suboh, 10, from Beit Lahiya, lost his eyesight and some skin on his face Saturday when, his mother said, a fiery substance clung to him as he darted home from a shelter where his family was staying to pick up clothes.
The substance smelled like burned trash, said Ms. Jaawanah, the mother who fled her home in Zeitoun, who had experienced it too. She had no affection for Hamas, but her sufferings were changing that.Do you think Im against them firing rockets now? she asked, referring to Hamas.No. I was against it before. Not anymore.
What does this have anything to do with the topic/article at hand? take your rhetoric elsewhere 'peaceful' muslim scum.

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