Human rights observers arrive in Hond...

Human rights observers arrive in Honduras

There are 24 comments on the english.people.com.cn story from Aug 17, 2009, titled Human rights observers arrive in Honduras. In it, english.people.com.cn reports that:

A delegation of the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights will arrive here on Monday to learn about the human rights situation in Honduras after the June 28 coup. Editor note...I can only hope that they look at both sides and violations and not presumptions. They need to look at the violations of rights of children to an education, violations by IHSS workers to provide health care- Violations by Zelaya by refusing treatment for disease if the person didn´t sign his damned peitition..and finally his call to blockade elections with violence and the violence against business and private citizens who do not agree with the resistence crap.

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Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#1 Aug 17, 2009
The funny thing about this group...they are led by Venezuela...yeah that is right the country of violations of human rights...that is like letting Iran come preach to the US about religious freedom.
JRobert

United States

#2 Aug 18, 2009
Venezuela? Gee, I wonder what their findings will be?

How much you want to bet that Zelaya's abuses are "outside the parameter of their investigations?"

And, China's "Peoples Daily" reporting on human rights abuses? Doubly ironic.

Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#3 Aug 18, 2009
Yeah...I hear ya...the parents of children being denied education by these striking teachers are having trouble getting an appointment to report the human rights abuses to this commission it seems they aren´t interested in abuses against children by teachers or threats. We shall see what report they come up with but illegitimate is coming to mind from the moment they sent a group headed by Venezuela the deck is stacked on purpose.
John Roberts

United States

#4 Aug 18, 2009
Summermoondancer wrote:
Yeah...I hear ya...the parents of children being denied education by these striking teachers are having trouble getting an appointment to report the human rights abuses to this commission it seems they aren´t interested in abuses against children by teachers or threats. We shall see what report they come up with but illegitimate is coming to mind from the moment they sent a group headed by Venezuela the deck is stacked on purpose.
Kinda like the referendum/poll that never happened, the results on human rights are already tallied and ready to report, even though they just arrived!

Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#5 Aug 18, 2009
Yep!:( I would think that honest human rights commissions would want to see all aspects of the issue and to discover fairly whether there is violations and whose rights have been violated...now maybe I am wrong but I have all of my life been under the impression that children are the most vunerable of all citizens and should have their rights protected above all others.
Roberto Zorro

Houston, TX

#6 Aug 18, 2009
Summermoondancer wrote:
The funny thing about this group...they are led by Venezuela...yeah that is right the country of violations of human rights...that is like letting Iran come preach to the US about religious freedom.
Do you really think a team from Venezuela is the best critic in investigating violations of human rights. All the latest news about shutting down the free press and even education that opposes Chavez's marxist ideas. Hugo,listen to the Words of Jesus:

Matthew 7:5 (King James Version)
5 Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother's eye.

Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#7 Aug 18, 2009
I know they are not the best critic in fact they are the worst
John Roberts

United States

#8 Aug 19, 2009
Roberto Zorro wrote:
<quoted text>
Do you really think a team from Venezuela is the best critic in investigating violations of human rights. All the latest news about shutting down the free press and even education that opposes Chavez's marxist ideas. Hugo,listen to the Words of Jesus:
Matthew 7:5 (King James Version)
5 Thou hypocrite, first cast out the beam out of thine own eye; and then shalt thou see clearly to cast out the mote out of thy brother's eye.
Now, Amnesty International is alleging that they found protesters being detained for hours who had bruises, and scrapes, and that they had been dealt with too harshly by police.

Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#9 Aug 19, 2009
Well legally they can be detained if they are breaking the law. According to the Honduran constitution they can be held for 24 hours. In the US you can be held for up to 72 hours without ever being charged with a crime so being detained in and of itself is not a human rights violation.

Bruises and scrapes? Well we have burned buildings, torched cars, people that were injured with pro Zelaya´s throwing rocks and swinging bats..and they want to complain about bruises and scrapes I am quite frankly surprised that there haven´t been more fatalities...I have to only ponder what AI said about the LA riots in Los Angeles where 53 people perished.
tquinnmikelson

Bayfield, CO

#10 Aug 19, 2009
You go girl,it has fanily piss you off too.stay safe
JohnnyBoy

Roscoe, IL

#11 Aug 19, 2009
I suspect that Honduras lacks the resources to jail and try large numbers of people. And so if you start getting large and unruly mobs, the only solution is to turn the country over to the mobs, or punish the protesters on the spot for reasons of economy. I'm told that during the Korean war, if some GI's got in a fight, the local cops would move in and beat every fighter into submission. Not all that long ago here in the United States, if a man got unruly at a social gathering and ended up getting beat up, unless he was seriously injured that was just his tough luck.

Not the best system of course, because it invites abuse, but it is something that can be implemented with limited resources. Our current ideas about restraining interpersonal violence sometimes produce it by rewarding it. I wonder if there isn't some of that going on in Honduras right now
John Roberts

United States

#12 Aug 20, 2009
JohnnyBoy wrote:
I suspect that Honduras lacks the resources to jail and try large numbers of people. And so if you start getting large and unruly mobs, the only solution is to turn the country over to the mobs, or punish the protesters on the spot for reasons of economy. I'm told that during the Korean war, if some GI's got in a fight, the local cops would move in and beat every fighter into submission. Not all that long ago here in the United States, if a man got unruly at a social gathering and ended up getting beat up, unless he was seriously injured that was just his tough luck.
Not the best system of course, because it invites abuse, but it is something that can be implemented with limited resources. Our current ideas about restraining interpersonal violence sometimes produce it by rewarding it. I wonder if there isn't some of that going on in Honduras right now
I like your description of the word "mobs".

Whether it is or not, being able to peacefully demonstrate should be a basic, human right but, mobs should be dealt with as such, no matter where they occur!

Turn your peaceful demonstration into a "mob" without regard for law, people's safety, or property, and get your head busted!!

Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#13 Aug 20, 2009
I couldn´t agree more.
Roberto Zorro

Houston, TX

#14 Aug 20, 2009
JohnnyBoy wrote:
I suspect that Honduras lacks the resources to jail and try large numbers of people. And so if you start getting large and unruly mobs, the only solution is to turn the country over to the mobs, or punish the protesters on the spot for reasons of economy. I'm told that during the Korean war, if some GI's got in a fight, the local cops would move in and beat every fighter into submission. Not all that long ago here in the United States, if a man got unruly at a social gathering and ended up getting beat up, unless he was seriously injured that was just his tough luck.
Not the best system of course, because it invites abuse, but it is something that can be implemented with limited resources. Our current ideas about restraining interpersonal violence sometimes produce it by rewarding it. I wonder if there isn't some of that going on in Honduras right now
As a visitor to Honduras I was always taught to respect their authorities and obey their laws or else you would have to pay the consequences and that could include being put into an overcrowded jail with hardened criminals. That has motivated me to be on my best behavior. When you are a visitor to any country you have to realize you are no londer in your own country.
Roberto Zorro

Houston, TX

#15 Aug 20, 2009
They ought to just be thankful they did not get put in jail for 20 years hard labor for simply crossing the border of Iran or North Korea.
John Roberts

United States

#16 Aug 20, 2009
Roberto Zorro wrote:
They ought to just be thankful they did not get put in jail for 20 years hard labor for simply crossing the border of Iran or North Korea.
Speaking of which, do you really believe that those three tourists, taking a hike, accidentally hiked over the border with Iran, or that the two women, journalists weren't crossing the border to get the scoop on North Korea?

Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#17 Aug 20, 2009
John, not for a minute..I don´t believe them...but I still think that 20 years is excessive but those are their laws...in Thailand you get the death penalty for drugs.
Roberto Zorro

United States

#18 Aug 20, 2009
Summermoondancer wrote:
John, not for a minute..I don´t believe them...but I still think that 20 years is excessive but those are their laws...in Thailand you get the death penalty for drugs.
In Saudi Arabia you could go to jail for carrying a Bible to their country. Atleast it used to be that way according to a man I knew that went over their from Shell for some work.
Roberto Zorro

United States

#19 Aug 20, 2009
And guess what most visitors obey their laws out of respect and fear of the consequences.
John Roberts

United States

#20 Aug 20, 2009
Summermoondancer wrote:
John, not for a minute..I don´t believe them...but I still think that 20 years is excessive but those are their laws...in Thailand you get the death penalty for drugs.
You can see the conflicts in my life:

On the one hand, I try to be as charitable as I can logically be but, on the other hand, on humanitarian grounds Scotland just released the man responsible for killing 270 people on Pan American flight #103.

Unfortunately, he'll be received in Libya as a hero but, I say let that bastard rot/die in jail, it's the punishment that he got for his crimes!

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