Zelaya followers threaten to boycott ...

Zelaya followers threaten to boycott Honduran poll

There are 99 comments on the The Taipei Times story from Aug 11, 2009, titled Zelaya followers threaten to boycott Honduran poll. In it, The Taipei Times reports that:

Followers of ousted Honduran president Manuel Zelaya stage a rally in Monte Redondo, Honduras, on Monday.

Join the discussion below, or Read more at The Taipei Times.

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Roberto Zorro

United States

#1 Aug 11, 2009
Boycott why? It won't help Mel even if he could finish his term. Why would Mel not wqant the man he selected as VP to win. This guy has gone over the edge. Not only does he look like Saddam , he is acting like him too with that big EGO.

Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#2 Aug 11, 2009
Actually not sure why they call this a poll...it is the ELECTION they want to boycott and that will only hurt them. Of course they want to try to create violence and interupt the election so that people are intimidated..ala KKK, Taliban, and Al Qaeda style...I think that INTERPOL and UN Peacekeepers should be brought in for that one alongside of Honduran soldiers and police...
John Roberts

Spring, TX

#3 Aug 12, 2009
Summermoondancer wrote:
Actually not sure why they call this a poll...it is the ELECTION they want to boycott and that will only hurt them. Of course they want to try to create violence and interupt the election so that people are intimidated..ala KKK, Taliban, and Al Qaeda style...I think that INTERPOL and UN Peacekeepers should be brought in for that one alongside of Honduran soldiers and police...
Hmmm, go ahead and stay home from the election, fools!

A good example of this twisted logic is Iraq, where the shiites dropped out, didn't participate in the first, democratic election that had ever been held, and then cried and cried because they didn't get enough representation in the new government....dumbasses!

Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#4 Aug 12, 2009
dumbasses is exactly the word I was thinking but did not say..
JohnnyBoy

Canton, IL

#5 Aug 13, 2009
If we are going to be real about it, what they want to do is to de-legitimize the election. That works best if a case can be made that the election was rigged. Provided that foreign observers are allowed to monitor the process, I doubt this is a useful tactic.
John Roberts

Spring, TX

#6 Aug 13, 2009
JohnnyBoy wrote:
If we are going to be real about it, what they want to do is to de-legitimize the election. That works best if a case can be made that the election was rigged. Provided that foreign observers are allowed to monitor the process, I doubt this is a useful tactic.
To keep it real then, there should have been more exposure to Zelaya's rigged, results of a poll that never took place.

Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#7 Aug 13, 2009
John there was lots of exposure on it here including the showing of the machines, tabulated results, press releases and so on...for some reason international media decided to ignore that.
JohnnyBoy

Urbana, IL

#8 Aug 13, 2009
Summermoondancer wrote:
John there was lots of exposure on it here including the showing of the machines, tabulated results, press releases and so on...for some reason international media decided to ignore that.
I think I can tell you what is going on. The international media is forcing your situation onto a template of political left verses right, with the press favoring the left.

With regard to how valid this is,

The current leadership is unavoidably the establishment, and therefore the right-wingers. You can call them the former plantation owners, terrorist thugs, the power structure, the hundred families, military rulers, it doesn't matter, they are the establishment.

On the other side of it, Zelaya is truly a piss-poor fit onto the noble, poor helping, left. But do not underestimate the ability of ideologues, whether religious or secular, to force their version of reality onto a situation. The press thinks it is on a moral crusade, and are unlikely to let go of that template.

As for Honduras, maybe it isn't so bad. If you don't get a cut off in trade, maybe the loss in welfare handouts won't be such a big deal. This whole "We are a poor country, help us," routine can be self defeating if it invites inaction. Easy money often corrupts countries because the public isn't as upset when the leaders waste it.

Any way, best of luck with your situation.
John Roberts

Spring, TX

#9 Aug 13, 2009
JohnnyBoy wrote:
<quoted text>
I think I can tell you what is going on. The international media is forcing your situation onto a template of political left verses right, with the press favoring the left.
With regard to how valid this is,
The current leadership is unavoidably the establishment, and therefore the right-wingers. You can call them the former plantation owners, terrorist thugs, the power structure, the hundred families, military rulers, it doesn't matter, they are the establishment.
On the other side of it, Zelaya is truly a piss-poor fit onto the noble, poor helping, left. But do not underestimate the ability of ideologues, whether religious or secular, to force their version of reality onto a situation. The press thinks it is on a moral crusade, and are unlikely to let go of that template.
As for Honduras, maybe it isn't so bad. If you don't get a cut off in trade, maybe the loss in welfare handouts won't be such a big deal. This whole "We are a poor country, help us," routine can be self defeating if it invites inaction. Easy money often corrupts countries because the public isn't as upset when the leaders waste it.
Any way, best of luck with your situation.
That's a great analogy, I agree with you but, now can you give us a solution??
Roberto Zorro

United States

#10 Aug 13, 2009
John Roberts wrote:
<quoted text>
That's a great analogy, I agree with you but, now can you give us a solution??
It seems some of the things given for the poor under Mel ended up going bad in a warehouse. I think that it is good to have missions help out the poor and the needy but it is better to put some unemployed able bodies to work. The old say "idleness is the devils workshop" is true too. Honduras has been known for corruption long before Mel but I think tough times like these can pull the country together. There are certainly plenty of resources in beautiful Honduras and plenty of Churches. I think less dependency on other countries is a good thing but of course the elderly and the poor need some help(hello Church). After Mitch we knew a Church that started an orphanage and the govt would send children there from the courts. Reaching out and helping someone in need is a good thing.
JohnnyBoy

Bogart, GA

#11 Aug 13, 2009
John Roberts wrote:
<quoted text>
That's a great analogy, I agree with you but, now can you give us a solution??
Perhaps we use language differently, but I intended no analogy. I believe the press is forcing their perception of your situation as a struggle between left and right, and that explains the coverage more than anything else.

As far as what to do, don't be overly concerned with being condemned by this or that politician as long as no actions follow. Most of that is just politicians grand standing for the crowds at home.

I do think you have a problem with presenting proper political propaganda. A couple of examples of things you might be doing,

When I see pictures of your government I see way too many white people. I regard it as reverse racism to get a brown guy in the picture only because he is brown, but you gotta do what you gotta do. Get some people with a little color in their skin that can pass as Indian and have them in positions that give them press air time. Otherwise your government looks exactly as some describe it, like a bunch of white European ex plantation owners.

Quit talking about that 4th urn thing. It is way to technical to appeal to most people. The story line is that Zelaya was booted from office because he was a conceited scumbag. In other words, put reasons up that run him down personally. Something like some starving Indian kids followed by footage of food rotting in a warehouse.

My overall impression is that your government could use some kind of political spin guy. Way to often it seems like a bunch of white upper class guys saying things of concern to other white upper class guys.

As for the current press coverage, I doubt it can be changed. Honduras is a little place that has already had its fifteen minutes of fame. It seems unlikely to me that you can generate enough attention to overcome current perceptions, at least in the short run.
Roberto Zorro

United States

#12 Aug 13, 2009
JohnnyBoy wrote:
<quoted text>
Perhaps we use language differently, but I intended no analogy. I believe the press is forcing their perception of your situation as a struggle between left and right, and that explains the coverage more than anything else.
As far as what to do, don't be overly concerned with being condemned by this or that politician as long as no actions follow. Most of that is just politicians grand standing for the crowds at home.
I do think you have a problem with presenting proper political propaganda. A couple of examples of things you might be doing,
When I see pictures of your government I see way too many white people. I regard it as reverse racism to get a brown guy in the picture only because he is brown, but you gotta do what you gotta do. Get some people with a little color in their skin that can pass as Indian and have them in positions that give them press air time. Otherwise your government looks exactly as some describe it, like a bunch of white European ex plantation owners.
Quit talking about that 4th urn thing. It is way to technical to appeal to most people. The story line is that Zelaya was booted from office because he was a conceited scumbag. In other words, put reasons up that run him down personally. Something like some starving Indian kids followed by footage of food rotting in a warehouse.
My overall impression is that your government could use some kind of political spin guy. Way to often it seems like a bunch of white upper class guys saying things of concern to other white upper class guys.
As for the current press coverage, I doubt it can be changed. Honduras is a little place that has already had its fifteen minutes of fame. It seems unlikely to me that you can generate enough attention to overcome current perceptions, at least in the short run.
I don't think the race card works because Castro and Hugo aren't real dark. The whole problem is misconception by the naive outsiders persuaded by the media which is heavily funded with Petro dollars from Chavez and others. Honduras will fix their own problems .

Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#13 Aug 13, 2009
Johnny the race card doesn´t work real well in Honduras because our celebrities political and in normal life cross many color schemes..this is really one of the most non racial countries you will find in fact it is more likely that darker skin colors discriminate against lighter ones..Mexico and Honduras are different countries..here color is just that color. Look at who our favorites on our soccer team are(remember sports in Honduras isn´t the same as the US so don´t look at it with those eyes) Carlos Pavon and Carlos Costly stole the show last night and they are both Garifuna(black), Rambo is a dark shade himself but not black..he is truly a favorite here.
The national dance is the ´punta´the Punta is a Garifuna dance that is really very complicated to do. We have left more than a few Mexicans standing with their mouths gaping open when Hondurans show up and put on Banda Blanca and go at it dancing Punta...here is a video for you to look at.
Punta means new life and sometimes is called banguity. Believe it or not this dance started being done by Garifuna in funerals..yeah we dance at funerals..go figure..you guys act sad...we say our prayers say good bye to our loved ones and dance and eat and party. The idea is if the person was a very happy type you want to give him a happy exit from this life by celebrating his passing over so that he will pass happy and with ease. We also believe that while one has died that another thousand will be born so it is a circle of life type of dance.
The rythmn is very complex one of the tambor drums is played at a 2/4 or 4/4 beat double time and the feet move to this beat, the second drum plays 6/8 double as well and songs are sang at the 4/4 beat. The dance is also the origin of the jazz funerals in New Orleans....bet you didn´t know that did you?
Anyhow here is a video to give everyone an idea of the traditional dance that everyone dances whether white or black..want to see everyone happy play this music and it doesn´t have to be a funeral..parties do quite well..or even just street gatherings where all are talking..my neighbor who is garifuna and I have many times danced punta in the middle of the street..we have a great time and usually about half the neighborhood will join in..imagine that about 150 people dancing for the heck of it....just because music started..makes for interesting coversation..I can imagine the reaction in the states...they would think we all lost our cookies..


This one I had to include because it was a cute little kid showing us all up...he can dance
http://www.youtube.com/watch...

These are professional punta dancers
http://www.youtube.com/watch...
Roberto Zorro

United States

#14 Aug 13, 2009
Rambo was a crowd favorite even though he came off the bench. Was he a phenom on Olympia. We knew a black named Smiley in New Orleans who actually played for Olympia. He was from Ceiba area. I am still working on my wife to move to Honduras later on. My latest compromise is move to Miami area during the cold winters and tornado season(she has a lot of Honduran friends there). Then we can fly to Honduras real cheap any time we want to. Then during the Tropical storm season back to Oklahoma. I just like the Latin American feel.
John Roberts

Spring, TX

#15 Aug 13, 2009
Roberto Zorro wrote:
Rambo was a crowd favorite even though he came off the bench. Was he a phenom on Olympia. We knew a black named Smiley in New Orleans who actually played for Olympia. He was from Ceiba area. I am still working on my wife to move to Honduras later on. My latest compromise is move to Miami area during the cold winters and tornado season(she has a lot of Honduran friends there). Then we can fly to Honduras real cheap any time we want to. Then during the Tropical storm season back to Oklahoma. I just like the Latin American feel.
Please excuse a gringo's ignorance about futbol but, where does Honduras' win over Costa Rica put them in standing for the World Cup?
Roberto Zorro

United States

#16 Aug 13, 2009
John Roberts wrote:
<quoted text>
Please excuse a gringo's ignorance about futbol but, where does Honduras' win over Costa Rica put them in standing for the World Cup?
Here's the scoop:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2010_FIFA_World_...

Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#17 Aug 15, 2009
So as you can see we are doing very well concidering number one got their tails kicked..
JRobert

United States

#18 Aug 16, 2009
The Taipei Times is a leftist operation that has received accolades from the New York Times.

Obviously, this is another pro-Marxism media story, cast in a sympathetic way toward the attempt to take over Central America.

The Times repeats without question the Zelaya supporters' claim that “if the coup leaders don’t accept (their demand for the return of Zelaya), there won’t be any elections" and follow it up with the scare-mongering editorial comment that "the move was likely to further prolong the crisis that has gripped the impoverished Central American country."

Then they throw in the usual Marxist boogyman, with a quote from Cuban dictator Raul Castro that the expelling of Zelaya had to come with the blessing of the U.S.

Of course that's ridiculous, since Obama was an early backer of the return of Zelaya and has also called Chavez his "amigo."

Continue the fight to hold onto your democracy, Hondurans. Keep Zelaya, the Chavez/Castro front-man for Marxism, out of your country.
tquinnmikelson

Durango, CO

#19 Aug 16, 2009
Good one,maybe just stupid.
Summermoondancer wrote:
dumbasses is exactly the word I was thinking but did not say..
Noem

United States

#20 Aug 16, 2009
Hey can anyone help me?? About 2-3 weeks ago, I saw a picture of President Zelaya on tv (I do not remember what channel. Anyway, in the picture, the xpresident is between 18 or 20 years old. The funny thing, is that mel was holding on his body like 3-4 guns (he looks like a terrorist). And it is ironic that his instints for communism has been with him since young age.. Well, my problem is that I have looked for this picture in the web and I cannot find him. Did anyone else saw this picture?

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