The big loser in the Honduras political crisis? The economy.

Nov 4, 2009 Full story: Christian Science Monitor 11

Doris Midence, a snack bar employee at La Tigra National Park outside the Honduran capital, Tegucigalpa, has the empty gaze of someone with too much time on her hands.

"Customers are down by half," she says, reorganizing gum and candy bars. "Between curfews and protests, people are not leaving their homes."

The Honduran political crisis - at four months and counting, after ousted President Manuel Zelaya was arrested and deposed by the military June 28 - could finally be coming to an end. Both sides have signed a deal that calls on Congress to decide whether Mr. Zelaya gets to return to office. But even if the curfews are being lifted, the economic ramifications of Latin America's worst crisis for decades could endure much longer.

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Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#1 Nov 5, 2009
The economy was already trashed thanks to the economic crash in the US
John Roberts

Houston, TX

#2 Nov 5, 2009
Summermoondancer wrote:
The economy was already trashed thanks to the economic crash in the US
The big LOSER in this crisis is the RAT who created it!! Is anyone surprised that now Zelaya says that he won't participate in the unity government unless he is restored first....
Alex

Hamilton, Canada

#3 Nov 5, 2009
The big loser is the people of Honduras - all of us! Opportunities have faded away because of Mel and Micheletti. Gaining confidence in ourselves will take some time. But we will survive!
John Roberts

Houston, TX

#4 Nov 5, 2009
Alex wrote:
The big loser is the people of Honduras - all of us! Opportunities have faded away because of Mel and Micheletti. Gaining confidence in ourselves will take some time. But we will survive!
You're right, Alex, I apologize for minimizing the impact of this on the Honduran people.

I, for one, hope to invest in Honduras, and plan to live in Honduras, at least part-time, within a few years.

Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#5 Nov 5, 2009
au contraire...I donīt blame the leaders as much as I think we should blame ourselves for putting up with the corruption as if it were part of normal life...long ago had Hondurans put their foot down and insisted on things being done right we would be much further than we are. Instead we allow teachers and politicians to act like uneducated hood rats. We have to look in the mirror and realize who has the solution to the problem.
Alex

Hamilton, Canada

#6 Nov 5, 2009
Summermoondancer wrote:
au contraire...I donīt blame the leaders as much as I think we should blame ourselves for putting up with the corruption as if it were part of normal life...long ago had Hondurans put their foot down and insisted on things being done right we would be much further than we are. Instead we allow teachers and politicians to act like uneducated hood rats. We have to look in the mirror and realize who has the solution to the problem.
Indeed! Directly, those who have the power to make decisions [or influence on policymaking - eg., some greedy corporate rats, union leaders] that will affect us all are responsible for the mess. Indirectly, WE, like you say, are responsible - because we all failed to elect the best, brightest and honest leaders! You Summer, are quite right, and hence, our BIG responsibility lies in knowing how to elect the leaders who are best for the community and the country, and not only for a handful of businesspeople, or union mobsters.

We need to build a meritocracy: a system that enables the hardest working, honest, brightest, and caring people to climb up the social ladder. Those who work hard, and are honest deserve to be on top.
Alex

Hamilton, Canada

#7 Nov 5, 2009
John Roberts wrote:
<quoted text>
You're right, Alex, I apologize for minimizing the impact of this on the Honduran people.
I, for one, hope to invest in Honduras, and plan to live in Honduras, at least part-time, within a few years.
John, no need to apologise. I really thank you for believing in Honduras and its people, and for taking our issues as serious as any honduran. I personally promise that, at least in my case, I will work hard so that my country can be a good and decent place for you to live in, as well as for all my fellow hondurans, and for anyone who decides to be among us and abides to our laws.

Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#8 Nov 5, 2009
Alex, and we need to be able to jail leaders and that includes diputados, alcaldes, etc..that do not obey the law and steal from the Honduran people. The money that is given to Honduras for development has been stolen right and left and Hondurans turn a blind eye saying that all of the leaders do it...and it is just how it is in Honduras..no sorry that is not just how it is..that is precisely why six years ago they lost immunity so now we need to call them to face the music and be responsible and use that money the way it was intended(not for their pocketbook, not for trips around the world, not for jewelry for their $100,000 horse, not for a Ferrari for their kid or a fleet of 100 rented luxury cars) each and everyone should be brought on charges if they are found pilphering funds. In fact, I hope that we see a prison built for corrupt officials in Honduran government and the penalty should be a minimum of 20 years for stealing from the state.
Why do you not see things like that in the US? Because people like Madoff go to jail for life. It is a strong discouragement to go to jail for life for taking advantage of others.

Since: Apr 08

Dallas, Texas

#9 Nov 5, 2009
Alex, you do not know how good it felt to be in a crowd of angry parents that stood up to the teachers who were striking and vowing to not go back...we didnīt get them back for 5 days, but we got them back for 3 days and they did that angrily...but they did it because parents were spit fire angry...if that happened more the sindicate leaders would lose their death grip on society. The Rafael Algrias, Eugelio Chavezīdo not fight for our rights they fight for THEIR paycheck and their rights alone...in a meeting the other day one of the teachers said that Eugelio Chavez fought for rights. I stood up and told her no he fights for HIS rights and YOUR rights as a teacher, but he doesnīt care about the students rights and neither do you. I continued in telling her that if she cared about the students rights then she would have been in the classroom teaching the children instead of in the streets spray painting historical monuments, buildings, and destroying private property as if she were a gang member. I told her teachers are there to teach students and give them morals and character not to teach them to be delinquents and that they teach by example. I have to wonder how the US would react to a teacher that went out and destroyed and looted private property..I doubt they would be a teacher any longer that is for sure.
Jack Corsaut

Redding, CA

#10 Nov 7, 2009
Summermoondancer wrote:
Alex, and we need to be able to jail leaders and that includes diputados, alcaldes, etc..that do not obey the law and steal from the Honduran people. The money that is given to Honduras for development has been stolen right and left and Hondurans turn a blind eye saying that all of the leaders do it...and it is just how it is in Honduras..no sorry that is not just how it is..that is precisely why six years ago they lost immunity so now we need to call them to face the music and be responsible and use that money the way it was intended(not for their pocketbook, not for trips around the world, not for jewelry for their $100,000 horse, not for a Ferrari for their kid or a fleet of 100 rented luxury cars) each and everyone should be brought on charges if they are found pilphering funds. In fact, I hope that we see a prison built for corrupt officials in Honduran government and the penalty should be a minimum of 20 years for stealing from the state.
Why do you not see things like that in the US? Because people like Madoff go to jail for life. It is a strong discouragement to go to jail for life for taking advantage of others.
And this turn of legal events is a recent happening in America. It was not long ago that such people who had ruined so many lives, got off fairly lightly. They become well paid consultants and speakers - and that income is addition to what they were able to transfer to relatives who can't be legally attached...
JohnnyBoy

Chicago, IL

#11 Nov 8, 2009
The teaching class in the US is a curse. The problem is not abuse of position, it is abuse of doctrine. What Obama is trying to implement right now is consistent with what we have been teaching for about two generations. If the situation holds up it is entirely predictable that the US starts floundering into a terminally unsuccessful country, not as fast as Chavez is taking down Venezuela, but in the same general direction.

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