Collembola Springtails VS Delusory Parasitosis - Winner: THE BUGS

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buggie

Albuquerque, NM

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#1
Feb 8, 2010
 

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http://www.headlice.org/report/research/index...

COLLEMBOLA (SPRINGTAILS)(ARTHROPODA: HEXAPODA:
ENTOGNATHA) FOUND IN SCRAPINGS FROM INDIVIDUALS
DIAGNOSED WITH DELUSORY PARASITOSIS

Twenty individuals diagnosed with delusory parasitosis participated in a single site clinical study under the auspices of the National Pediculosis Association (NPA) and the Oklahoma State Department of Health. The objective of this study was to determine if there were any common factors in skin scrapings collected from this population. These individuals, whose symptoms were originally attributed to lice or scabies, were part of a larger group reporting symptoms of stinging/biting and/or crawling to the NPA. Multiple skin scrapings from each person were microscopically examined. Any and all fields of view that appeared incongruous to normal human skin were digitally photographed. When the photographic images were initially evaluated, no common factor was identified. However, more extensive scrutiny using imaging software revealed evidence of Collembola in 18 of the 20 participants...

...Identification of Collembola in scrapings from symptomatic study participants required intensive scrutiny of the photographs and was initially very difficult. Most Collembola were enmeshed in accumulations of exuviae. Eggs ranged from 20 to 100 microns in diameter. The size of most Collembola noted was 50–300 microns in length, suggesting a predominance of nymphs as opposed to adults. To ensure reliability of results, researchers verified at least two sightings before a subject was considered to have positive Collembola findings. However, scrapings from 10 of the subjects showed an abundance of Collembola. Evidence of Collembola was found in images of scrapings from 18 of the 20 individuals that had been diagnosed as delusional. Of the two participants without lesions or dermatitis at the time of the trial, one had images positive for Collembola...
buggie

Albuquerque, NM

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#2
Feb 8, 2010
 

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http://www.headlice.org/report/research/jnyes...

...The findings of Collembola in images of scrapings from 18 of the 20 symptomatic study participants supports their contention that they actually have something crawling on or under their skin and are not delusional. The images were reviewed by entomologists and the presence of Collembola verified and identified as representative of the families Isotomidae and Entomobryidae...

...The directive to photograph all images associated with abnormal skin was critical to identifying Collembola in the skin scrapings. The fields contained fungal mycelium, or what appeared at first glance to be cellular clumps or debris. The Collembola were extremely well hidden in the exuviae and therefore easy to miss. It was only after intense scrutiny that they were recognized. In addition, because the Collembola were not always intact or completely in focus, they were difficult to discern. Given these challenges, it is easy to appreciate why there have been only a few previous reports of Collembola in human skin...

(buggie's note: regarding a larger less controlled study):
...The population studied in this trial was a subset of over 1,500 individuals registered with the NPA as experiencing crawling and/or biting/stinging sensations in the absence of lice or scabies. This general population shares many of the characteristics of those who participated in the study. Although the questionnaire utilized was self-administered and had its limitations, it is reasonable to postulate that a percentage of this more general population may very well have similar findings to the 20 symptomatic individuals who participated in this study...

Since: Aug 09

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#3
Feb 8, 2010
 
....but the difficulty is ,is how the above study becomes standard and routine practice. I've seen something which I thought could be a Collembola but it's very hard to positively identify without a professional medical microscope and even then that's not so easy. I know Photoshop a bit but it would probably take a skilled technician who's also knowledgeable about Collembola species ,of which there are many, a lot of man-hours to come up with a positive analysis and that all equates to a lot of money.
I expect some image recognition software would help -feed in all the various types and life-stages and get the software to do the work....one day maybe...hopefully .
buggie

Albuquerque, NM

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#4
Feb 8, 2010
 
Study Locale. The clinical portion of this study was conducted at the Oklahoma State Department of Health, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma between June 28 and July 20, 2000. Study Participants. Twenty symptomatic participants were selected from the hundreds of individuals who had previously contacted the NPA regarding an unknown condition possibly associated with lice and/or scabies but for which these parasites had been ruled out. Their physicians subsequently diagnosed them as suffering from delusory parasitosis. These volunteers were accepted on the basis of their willingness to travel to Oklahoma City at their own expense, complete questionnaires regarding their symptoms and medical history, and submit to multiple skin scrapings. Ten controls, randomly selected from employees of the Oklahoma State Health Department, were also enrolled. All participants signed a waiver of liability and understood that this was an initial research effort.
Intake Evaluations. Intake consisted of having symptomatic participants complete a self- administered questionnaire that was similar in content to the ‘‘not-lice’’ survey posted on the NPA website ( www.headlice.org ). Body diagrams of ventral and dorsal surfaces were marked to identify common areas of lesions. Two participants had symptoms without lesions or dermatitis at the time of the trial.
Specimen Preparation. Trained personnel prepared all skin scrapings. Prior and subsequent to scraping the skin with a disposable scalpel, symptomatic areas and areas at or around lesions were cleansed with gauze and alcohol. Immediately after being obtained, the scraped material was transferred to a fresh microscope slide with a drop of sterile water, coverslipped and isolated. Between 15 and 35 slides were prepared and examined for each subject. Scrapings were obtained from non-symptomatic controls from regions of the body where most lesions were noted on symptomatic participants.
Specimen Photography and Data Tracking. All slides were viewed using an Olympus BX60 Dual Viewing Microscope. The images that appeared incongruent with normal healthy skin were photographed using a SPOT RGB digital camera and SPOT software version 3.0. Each image was assigned a unique identifier and the magnification of the image was recorded. Images were sized by comparison with images of a B&L micrometer with marks for 0.1 mm and 0.01 mm that were taken at 1003, 2003 and 4003 magnification with the same camera and software used in the clinical study. Initial microscopy was non-blinded; i.e., the clinicians examining and photographing the slides knew that they were from either the study participant or control group.
2004 SPRINGTAILS AND DELUSORY PARASITOSIS (COLLEMBOLA) 89
RESULTS
Over 300 microscopic fields from study participants who complained of stinging/biting and/ or crawling sensations in their skin appeared incongruent with normal skin and therefore were photographed for later scrutiny.
Pollen, conidia or spores, hyphae, mycelium or fibers, or what appeared to be clumped skin or cellular debris were identified during the first six months of image analysis. One or two-cell algae, nematodes, or what appeared to be insect eggs, larvae or embryos were also identified. Although everyone in the group had at least one of the above findings, none of the findings were a common factor in every subject, making it necessary to continue looking for a common denominator. Because Collembola had been reported from individuals experiencing these symptoms (Dasgupta and Dasgupta, 1995; Frye, 1997; Scott et al., 1962), they became the focus of subsequent image analysis.
buggie

Albuquerque, NM

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#5
Feb 8, 2010
 
benG1 wrote:
....but the difficulty is ,is how the above study becomes standard and routine practice. I've seen something which I thought could be a Collembola but it's very hard to positively identify without a professional medical microscope and even then that's not so easy. I know Photoshop a bit but it would probably take a skilled technician who's also knowledgeable about Collembola species ,of which there are many, a lot of man-hours to come up with a positive analysis and that all equates to a lot of money.
I expect some image recognition software would help -feed in all the various types and life-stages and get the software to do the work....one day maybe...hopefully .
Even if you went to all that trouble and collected your own samples, you would not be believed. They would say your samples were contaminated. Samples only count if the scientist took them. The paper mentions one sample taken by a patient was disregarded because it had dust mites on it. They assumed the dust mites did not come from the patient's skin. In my own little theory, dust mites are probably present on the skin and in the environment in addition to many other buggies - the same way that fleas like to bring their friends to the party hitchhiking on the flea's body. I also believe that buggie pheramones call other bugs like an open invitation long distance. They have way more sophisticated and effective communication than humans do.
itchygirl

Youngstown, OH

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#6
Feb 8, 2010
 

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BenG, have you tried any antifungal meds in conjunction with your other treatments? I keep reading that columbella infestations have a possible fungal component, and the above article even mentions them hiding in fungal mycillium. A few months into my problem I developed a fungal infection that had no symptoms other than a crawly feeling similar to what the mites produce. But at the time I was spraying the crap out of my house and bathing my animals weekly, and I wasn't getting bitten. I tried an antifungal spray on my crawlier bits and got considerable relief. I used miconazole nitrate spray for athlete's foot. I think that often these things carry a fungus with them, or choose people with low grade fungal infections, which of course become worse with all of the stuff we have to do to fight them. I have noticed that all of the things that work best on my skin have an antifungal component: Benzoyl benzoate, arm and hammer (contains sodium carbonate) and boric acid. But my problem isn't only fungal or the iver and insecticides wouldn't work. My sister also developed a fungal infection from this stuff, and there was one poster on here that didn't realize that she was cured of bugs because she had a crawly fungal infection. Just a thought.

BTW everyone, sorry I am posting so much. I have been snowed in with my husband (he went to work today thank god) 4 kids and 6 critters for the last three days. If we have another snow day tomorrow I will hang myself.
buggie

Albuquerque, NM

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#7
Feb 8, 2010
 
Itchygirl, Yeah it's very cold here too. I didn't want to go outside all day. I was wondering how a busy mom could find time to post!! ha ha.
buggie

El Monte, CA

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#8
Feb 22, 2010
 
Here's the thread and link izoconfused.
Lucci

New York, NY

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#9
Mar 3, 2010
 
Here is something that also speaks of fungus:
http://morgellonspgpr.wordpress.com/2010/03/0...
My personal feeling that whatever is biting us (there are those that think once we get infected we become a bug "attractor"), has infected us with a bacteria, virus, fungus, or possibly all three.
I don't know about any of you, but I'm taking the advice to get my body into an alkaline state because there may be a link to them liking an acid environment and most people are highly acidic.
buggie

Albuquerque, NM

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#10
Mar 4, 2010
 
This is well worth the read whether you buy the product or not. Long article but good.

http://www.cedarcidestore.com/COLLEMBOLA_TREA...

I can relate to this lady's expression:
http://www.cedarcidestore.com/mite_control.ht...
buggie

United States

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#11
Mar 22, 2010
 
Bump. Read from page 1. Good to print out for your doctor.
buggie

El Monte, CA

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#12
Mar 30, 2010
 
Bumping again for newbies. Read from 1st post. 18 out of 20 people who had been written off by their doctors as nutters. The docs were nuts, not them.
FOUND HELP

Ketchikan, AK

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May 3, 2010
 

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I recently had tropical rat mites infest my home. Once I got rid of them I still felt these crawling sensations/bites. COLLEMBOLA have been identified as the cause. GO TO A HOMEOPATH!! All I did was send in my spit and she confirmed I had collembola parasites. THEY WILL HELP YOU, using your body's natural fighters to get rid of these things. No topical treatment will work on your skin, only natural remedies. I had to share this, to prevent all those suffering from losing hope and committing suicide. THERE IS HOPE!!!! After going to 4 doctors who tested me for parasites and found NONE, the homeopath was my last hope. AND THAT is where I found my answers!! Go to a homeopath. These bugs are airborne, they are spreading fast, let's fight it!! Cedarcide.com will help us!!
Joe

Hollywood, FL

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#14
May 3, 2010
 

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FOUND HELP wrote:
I recently had tropical rat mites infest my home. Once I got rid of them I still felt these crawling sensations/bites. COLLEMBOLA have been identified as the cause. GO TO A HOMEOPATH!! All I did was send in my spit and she confirmed I had collembola parasites. THEY WILL HELP YOU, using your body's natural fighters to get rid of these things. No topical treatment will work on your skin, only natural remedies. I had to share this, to prevent all those suffering from losing hope and committing suicide. THERE IS HOPE!!!! After going to 4 doctors who tested me for parasites and found NONE, the homeopath was my last hope. AND THAT is where I found my answers!! Go to a homeopath. These bugs are airborne, they are spreading fast, let's fight it!! Cedarcide.com will help us!!
Cedarcide is a scam. That company will be glad to take your hard-earned money. You will be left floundering with no cure in sight and an empty bank account.

Since: Mar 10

Tucson, AZ

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#15
May 3, 2010
 

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And as long as we are talking about scams, think i'm gonna send some magicpharma Iver and another med off for lab analysis. Results probably 30-60 days. I'll post a new thread with results.

Since: Feb 10

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#16
May 4, 2010
 

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Desert,
I found that magicpharma iver was not nearly as effective as iver horse paste. I also found it rather interesting that every veterinary iver I've taken , as well as my one and only dose of prescribed Stromectol, was somewhat bitter tasting, while the magicpharma 6mg tablets were not. I think that it does contain iver, but the dosages are lower than stated. I would be curious to know the lab results.
Joe

Hollywood, FL

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#17
May 4, 2010
 

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DesertItch wrote:
And as long as we are talking about scams, think i'm gonna send some magicpharma Iver and another med off for lab analysis. Results probably 30-60 days. I'll post a new thread with results.
That's very interesting. Please post the results.
Joe

Hollywood, FL

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#18
May 4, 2010
 

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Joe wrote:
<quoted text>
Cedarcide is a scam. That company will be glad to take your hard-earned money. You will be left floundering with no cure in sight and an empty bank account.
Buggie. You can mark me as nuts if you want, but Cedarcide is a SCAM. They charge way too much money for their product. We all know this. Cedarcide may help, but you will not get cured with this product. With the money they charge for one simple spray, you can buy so many things that help just as well. I'm not nuts. Bite me.
Joe

Hollywood, FL

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#19
May 4, 2010
 

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Buggie. If you want to post here, feel free to post. You don't have to sit on the sidelines judging all the responses. This is your thread, so feel free to post.

Since: Feb 10

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#20
May 4, 2010
 

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Joe wrote:
Buggie. If you want to post here, feel free to post. You don't have to sit on the sidelines judging all the responses. This is your thread, so feel free to post.
It seems to me that the sole purpose of a lot of your more recent posts are to engage some of the other posters in disagreements. From what I have read of Buggie's posts over the last year and a half, she is pretty much on here to help, and usually tries not to respond to antagonism. I won't be surprised if she just ignores your post, nor will I blame her. The only point of an argument is to try to get someone else to at least understand your point of view, and perhaps change their mind. If there's no hope of that, it's pretty much a waste of time and energy. Nothing on this forum is worth getting angry over. Once again, peace.

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